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2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog
Neumann University
   
 
  Nov 18, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The Division Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies] designation are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degree/certificate program options offered by the Division of Continuing Adult and Professional Studies (CAPS).

 

Arts and Sciences (A&S)

  
  •  

    A&S 495 Arts and Sciences Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has completed the Internship Workshop and paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Senior-standing and admission to a major program of study in Arts and Sciences, or consent of the instructor.

    Formal application must be made to the Career and Personal Development Office well in advance of the midpoint of the
    semester to remain in good standing in the course.

  
  •  

    A&S 496 Arts and Sciences Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has completed the Internship Workshop and paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Intersnhip Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course. Students are provided with a specific assignment in a local, regional, state, or federal agency or organization that offers practical experience related to a major program of study in Arts and Sciences. Regular meetings with the instructor and other internship participants are required. A field supervisor will provide regular progress reports to the faculty instructor as well as a summary evaluation. Formal application must be made to the Office of Career and Personal Services well in advance of the midpoint of the semester to remain in good standing in the course. Pre-Requisite: Senior-standing and admission to a major program of study in Arts and Sciences, or consent of the instructor.

     

    Formal application must be made to the Office of Career and Personal Services well in advance of the midpoint of the
    semester to remain in good standing in the course.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Senior-standing and admission to a major program of study in Arts and Sciences, or consent of the instructor.

    Formal application must be made to the Career and Personal Devlopment Office well in advance of the midpoint of the
    semester to remain in good standing in the course.


Accounting (ACT)

  
  •  

    ACT 103 Principles of Accounting I

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the study of financial accounting as a system of recording, classifying, and summarizing economic transactions of business entities. In addition, a comprehensive study of accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity are covered. Accounts and financial statements for the proprietorship, partnership, and corporation are examined.

    Students enrolled in ENG 094  and/or MATH 092  may not register for this course.
  
  •  

    ACT 104 Principles of Accounting II

    3 Credits

    Areas of study include depreciation methods, inventory valuation, financial statement analysis, ratio analysis, and working capital. The fundamental measurement and control of costs within the corporate entity are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 103  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 126 Special Topics in Accounting

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Accounting [ACT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Accounting that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    ACT 210 Intermediate Accounting I

    3 Credits

    This course offers an in-depth examination of accounting theory as it relates to income measurement and asset valuation. Special emphasis is placed upon measurement, asset valuation, and promulgating generally accepted accounting principles. The impact of those principles on external reporting requirements is also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 104  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 211 Intermediate Accounting II

    3 Credits

    This continuation of Intermediate Accounting I focuses on the concepts related to liabilities, stockholders’ equity, investments, and further consideration of income determination and financial reporting, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. The time value of money related to asset valuation and pension planning are also analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 210  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 226 Special Topics in Accounting

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Accounting [ACT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Accounting that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    ACT 315 Advanced Accounting

    3 Credits

    Business combinations and consolidations, fund accounting, accounting for partnerships, and other specialized areas of accounting are studied in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 211  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 320 Cost Accounting

    3 Credits

    Topics include: (1) the study of cost accounting principles, systems, and models; (2) the development and application of job order costs, process costs, and cost burdens; (3) the comparison of projected and actual cost data and analysis of variances; and (4) the understanding of cost data for managerial planning and control of operations.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 104  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 321 International Accounting and Financial Statement Analyses

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on policy issues of foreign currency transactions, global inflation, transnational reporting and disclosure, international accounting (and auditing) standards, and financial statement analysis of multinational and foreign firms. Additional topics include the harmonization of accounting standards, exchange risk analysis, comparative practices, accounting for inflation, hedging, and managerial accounting appropriate for international operations.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 104  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 326 Special Topics in Accounting

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Accounting [ACT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Accounting that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    ACT 394-496 Cooperative Education

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with a specific assignment with a business, government agency, or other institution involving progressive learning in a specified area of accounting. Progress and summary reports and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor and field supervisor are required. The student is evaluated by a faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must also obtain sponsorship by a member of the Accounting faculty. Course numbers vary with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of this catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop and junior or senior status in the major.

  
  •  

    ACT 405 Principles of Auditing

    3 Credits

    The concepts, fundamentals, and techniques for the independent examination of financial statements and internal controls are examined. American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) audit standards and procedures are considered in the development of the audit program, working papers, and records leading to the audit opinion.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 103  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 406 Federal Taxation

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to income tax theory and policies as well as the structure and basis for present tax law and computations. An analysis of the preparation of tax returns for individuals, partnerships, and corporations is also included as is an emphasis on tax problems and cases.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 103  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ACT 410 Fraud Examination in Society

    3 credits

    This course examines the various legislative, administrative, and other societal remedies that have emerged in response to white-collar crime and investigates public and private sources that provide information on current issues in forensic accounting and fraud examiniation.  Cases in securities fraud, pension fraud, environmental crimes, anti-trust violations, bribery, money laundering, and corporate governance will be discussed.

  
  •  

    ACT 426 Special Topics in Accounting

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Accounting [ACT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Accounting that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    ACT 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of accounting that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


American Sign Language (ASL)

  
  •  

    ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I

    3 Credits

    This is an introductory course in American Sign Language (ASL) which is used by the majority of deaf people in the United States and Canada. Learning is structured through an approach which encourages natural conversational interaction, basic grammatical constructs, and Sign vocabulary. The importance of expressive and receptive practice is emphasized. Students are also introduced to deaf culture and social/community services which assist the deaf.

  
  
  •  

    ASL 126 Special Topics in American Sign Language

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in American Sign Language [ASL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in American Sign Language that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  for any Special Topics course in American Sign Language at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    ASL 226 Special Topics in American Sign Language

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in American Sign Language [ASL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in American Sign Language that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  for any Special Topics course in American Sign Language at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    ASL 326 Special Topics in American Sign Language

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in American Sign Language [ASL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in American Sign Language that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  for any Special Topics course in American Sign Language at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    ASL 426 Special Topics in American Sign Language

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in American Sign Language [ASL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in American Sign Language that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  for any Special Topics course in American Sign Language at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    ASL 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of American Sign Language that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay/project that demonstrates extensive learning and competence in American Sign Language. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Anthropology (ANTHR)

  
  •  

    ANTHR 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    3 Credits

    This course offers a comparison of social structures and worldviews as well as political and economic patterns in various societies throughout the world.

    Social Science Core Course

  
  •  

    ANTHR 102 Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    3 Credits

    Students examine a cross-cultural comparison of ethnicity, social stratification, beliefs and symbols, the arts, and expressive aspects of culture. Consideration is also given to the processes of cultural change.

    Social Science Core Course

  
  •  

    ANTHR 126 Special Topics in Anthropology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Anthropology [ANTHR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Anthropology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ANTHR 226 Special Topics in Anthropology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Anthropology [ANTHR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Anthropology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ANTHR 326 Special Topics in Anthropology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Anthropology [ANTHR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Anthropology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ANTHR 426 Special Topics in Anthropology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Anthropology [ANTHR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Anthropology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ANTHR 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Anthropology that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Art (ART)

  
  •  

    ART 101 Our Visual Heritage

    3 Credits

    ART 101 is an overview of Western art from the Prehistoric period to the Early Modern period. Students are introduced to basic visual vocabulary and media before the major styles are discussed. Significant works of art are presented to students through the screening of slides and videos.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 102 Art of Themodern Age

    3 Credits

    In this course, students survey developments in the visual arts from the Early Modern period to the present day. They are also introduced to basic visual vocabulary and media before the major movements are discussed. Significant works of art are presented to students through the screening of slides and videos.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 103 Studio Art Explored by Theme

    3 Credits

    ART 103 takes the student on a thematic journey through the history of art. Students are introduced to the concepts and materials of the studio artist and, under instructor supervision, create works of art based upon the surveyed themes.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 126 Special Topics in Art

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Art [ART] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated study of a particular artist, period, art form, or theme, such as women in art; religion and the plastic arts; art and cinema; the impact of the Franciscan movement on art; or various other topics. Special Topics courses in Art that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ART 220 Introduction to Computer Graphics

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to digital graphics using the computer, this course is designed for application to a variety of majors and covers the fundamentals of visual design as well as the capabilities of the computer as a design tool.

  
  •  

    ART 226 Special Topics in Art

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Art [ART] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated study of a particular artist, period, art form, or theme, such as women in art; religion and the plastic arts; art and cinema; the impact of the Franciscan movement on art; or various other topics. Special Topics courses in Art that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ART 230 Introduction to Oil Painting

    3 Credits

    ART 230 is an introduction to the art and history of oil painting. The techniques of canvas preparation, paint mixing, as well as the principles of color and composition are emphasized in this studio course. The student acquires skills primarily through supervised projects.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 240 Introduction to Drawing

    3 Credits

    ART 240 is an introductory studio course in drawing which is designed to help the student develop the ability to observe the visual world and translate those observations onto a two-dimensional surface. Various media are explored, and the history of each medium is surveyed.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 250 Introduction to Calligraphy

    3 Credits

    This studio course is designed to develop an appreciation for the history and traditions of calligraphy. A variety of letter forms are studied. Design and craftsmanship are emphasized, and skills are developed through a series of supervised projects.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 260 Introduction to Printmaking

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the techniques of Relief and Intaglio printmaking. Skills are developed through a series of supervised studio projects, and the history of the medium is explored.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 270 Introduction to Silkscreen Printing

    3 Credits

    ART 270 is a studio course focusing on silkscreen preparation and printing. Various stenciling methods, the production of multicolored images, and the history of the medium are also studied. The student acquires skill in this medium through a series of supervised projects.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 280 Two-dimensional Design

    3 Credits

    The individual elements and principles of art and their interaction within a two-dimensional composition are examined in this course. Historic examples of design are presented, and visual problem-solving skills are developed through a series of supervised studio projects, thus providing students with a deeper appreciation for the visual in our culture.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 295 Digital Imaging

    3 Credits

    ART 295 introduces students to the creative process of digital imaging through a series of imaging projects. Masterworks are surveyed through the screening of PowerPoint slides. Basic concepts covered include composition, using a digital camera and scanner, printing on a color inkjet printer, and software image editing. Communication skills are developed through both image making and class critiques. Students taking this course must have the use of a 6 megapixel (or higher) digital camera approved by the instructor.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    ART 326 Special Topics in Art

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Art [ART] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated study of a particular artist, period, art form, or theme, such as women in art; religion and the plastic arts; art and cinema; the impact of the Franciscan movement on art; or various other topics. Special Topics courses in Art that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ART 330 Intermediate Oil Painting

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 340 Intermediate Drawing

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 350 Intermediate Calligraphy

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 360 Intermediate Printmaking

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 370 Intermediate Silkscreen Printing

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 395 Intermediate Digital Imaging

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 295  or permission of instructor.

  
  •  

    ART 426 Special Topics in Art

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Art [ART] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated study of a particular artist, period, art form, or theme, such as women in art; religion and the plastic arts; art and cinema; the impact of the Franciscan movement on art; or various other topics. Special Topics courses in Art that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ART 430 Advanced Oil Painting

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 440 Advanced Drawing

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
  •  

    ART 450 Advanced Calligraphy

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
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    ART 460 Advanced Printmaking

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
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    ART 470 Advanced Silkscreen Printing

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

  
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    ART 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of art that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified studio assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
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    ART 494-496 Cooperative Education

    Credit Varies

    Students are given a specific assignment with an agency or other institution involving progressive learning in a specified area of art. Progress and summary reports and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor are required. The student is evaluated by the faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must obtain sponsorship by a member of the Art faculty. Course number varies with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of the catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop.

  
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    ART 495 Advanced Digital Imaging

    3 Credits

    Intermediate (300-level) and advanced (400-level) studio art courses may be taken by students who have either completed the introductory course (200-level) or have received permission of the instructor. Both intermediate- and advanced-level credits may only be earned when the introductory course is offered. Students meet individually with the instructor to develop course objectives and projects. Periodic meetings with the instructor and participation in group critiques are required. Studio Art courses taken at the intermediate and/or advanced level do not satisfy the Fine Arts Core Requirement.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 295  or permission of instructor


Arts Production and Performance (ARTPP)

  
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    ARTPP 126 Special Topics in Arts Production and Performance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance [ARTPP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    ARTPP 180 Introduction to Arts Production and Performance

    3 Credits

    Students are presented with an overview of the principles of contemporary arts production and the practices of arts management and administration. Career opportunities are explored, and presentations by guest production artists and arts managers enhance the students’ understanding of the interrelated challenges of production and management.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
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    ARTPP 226 Special Topics in Arts Production and Performance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance [ARTPP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ARTPP 326 Special Topics in Arts Production and Performance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance [ARTPP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    ARTPP 394-396 Cooperative Education

    Credit Varies

    Students are provided with a specific assignment with an arts organization involving progressive learning in a specified area of production and/or performance. Progress and summary reports and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor are required. The student is evaluated by the faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must also obtain sponsorship by a member of the Arts faculty. Course number varies with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of this catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop and junior or senior status in the major.

  
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    ARTPP 426 Special Topics in Arts Production and Performance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance [ARTPP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Arts Production and Performance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    ARTPP 460 Seminar in Arts Production and Performance

    3 Credits

    In this capstone course of the Arts Production and Performance major, students apply what they have learned in the program by forming a production company which plans, organizes, administers, and produces a complex multimedia event. Course work involves a systematic critique of the process and the product.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTPP 180  and ARTPP Cooperative Education Major Requirement.

  
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    ARTPP 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of arts production and performance that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
  •  

    ARTPP 494-496 Cooperative Education

    Credit Varies

    Students are provided with a specific assignment with an arts organization involving progressive learning in a specified area of production and/or performance. Progress and summary reports and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor are required. The student is evaluated by the faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must also obtain sponsorship by a member of the Arts faculty. Course number varies with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of this catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop and junior or senior status in the major.


Athletic Training (ATR)

  
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    ATR 100 Introduction to Athletic Training

    2 Credits

    This course introduces the student to the profession of Athletic Training and examines the role of the athletic trainer as part of a sports medicine team. A history of the profession and how the profession is expected to evolve is also presented. A clinical portion of the class orientates the student to the basic skills that are required to become an athletic trainer.

  
  •  

    ATR 126 Special Topics in Athletic Training

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Athletic Training [ATR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Athletic Training that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students who have previously taken and successfully completed ATR 100 , Introduction to Athletic Training. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to ATR 100 , are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ATR 189 Level I Practicum

    1 Credit

    This first clinical course provides the student with hands-on work experience in a laboratory setting in the areas of taping, wrapping, bandaging, and bracing techniques for athletic injury care and prevention. During the semester in which the course is taken, the student is required to attend weekly class meetings with designated faculty as well as commit time outside of class to practice the techniques taught in class. Additionally, students must complete a 10-hour clinical rotation to observe an athletic trainer of their choosing. Through the clinical practicum experience, the student both acquires and demonstrates selected skills which are identified in NATA Clinical Proficiencies and taught in ATR 100 .

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 100 .

  
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    ATR 200 Integrated Functional Anatomy for Athletic Training I

    1 Credit

    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the musculoskeletal system as it relates to the lower extremity and lumbar spine. The anatomy is then related to athletic injury and illness. The student will be expected to perform palpations of all bony structures and soft tissue to begin to understand how anatomy and injury are related.

  
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    ATR 205 Integrated Functional Anatomy for Athletic Training

    3 Credits

    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the musculoskeletal system as it relates to the upper extremity, lower extremity, neck and trunk. The anatomy is then related to athletic injury and illness. The student is expected to identify and perform palpations of all bony and soft tissue structures. This course provides a basic understanding how anatomy, movement, function and injury are related.

  
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    ATR 210 Integrated Functional Anatomy for Athletic Training II

    1 Credit

    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the musculoskeletal system as it relates to the upper extremity and spine. The anatomy is then related to athletic injury and illness. The student will be expected to perform palpations of all bony structures and soft tissue to begin to understand how anatomy and injury are related.

  
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    ATR 220 Emergency Response: First Aid and CPR

    3 Credits

     

    This course emphasizes the principles of first aid and professional life support. The course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to act as a first responder in an emergency situation until more advanced medical help arrives. The course will consist of lectures and labs that will mimic actual emergency situations.

  
  •  

    ATR 226 Special Topics in Athletic Training

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Athletic Training [ATR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Athletic Training that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students who have previously taken and successfully completed ATR 100 , Introduction to Athletic Training. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to ATR 100 , are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ATR 240 Strength and Conditioning

    2 Credits

    This course introduces to the student a comprehensive overview strength and conditioning principles. Topics include core concepts, training variables, and training cycles. The student will be able to design specific conditioning program for athletes and be able to demonstrate proper techniques for training.

  
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    ATR 245 Resistance Training and Conditioning

    2 Credits

    In this laboratory course, the student is introduced to a variety of training exercises, including the use of all equipment types, Olympic lifts, powerlifting, and general body exercises. Through these activities, the student learns to demonstrate the proper techniques for training and lifting.

  
  •  

    ATR 250 Prevention/Assessment of the Lower Extremity

    3 Credits

    In this demanding course, the student gains a working knowledge of the techniques that are involved in preparing athletes for competition and evaluating athletes with medical conditions. The goals of this course are to provide the student with a thorough understanding of orthopedic evaluation as well as common athletic injuries related to the lower extremity. Other topics of study include, but not limited to, specific conditions related to the lower extremity, systematic evaluation procedures, differential diagnosis, documentation procedures, and tissue response to injury, environmental considerations, and the psychology of athletes. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 189  , ATR 220  (with a minimum grade of “C”).
    Concurrent with: ATR 255  ,BIO 130  /BIO 135  or BIO 205 /BIO 215 .

  
  •  

    ATR 255 Prevention/Assessment of the Lower Extremity Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 250 , Prevention and Assessment of the Lower Extremity, provides the student with practical techniques that are involved in preparing athletes for competition and evaluating athletes with medical conditions. The goals of the class are to provide the student with up-to-date understanding of the proper evaluation of injuries related to the regions of the lower extremity. At the conclusion of this laboratory course, the student is able to perform all assessment techniques for the lower extremity. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments. Other topics of study include, but are not limited to, specific conditions related to the lower extremity, environmental considerations, and psychology of athletes.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 189  , ATR 220  (with a minimum grade of “C”).
    Concurrent with: ATR 250  , BIO 130  /BIO 135  or BIO 205 /BIO 215 .


  
  •  

    ATR 260 Exercise Technique and Prescription

    2 Credits

    This course introduces to the student comprehensive overview strength and conditioning testing and evaluation. Topics also include anaerobic and aerobic exercise prescriptions. The student will have a better understanding of exercise prescription, specifically anaerobic technique and prescription.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

  
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    ATR 270 Program Design in Strength and Conditioning

    2 Credits

    This course introduces to the student comprehensive overview strength and conditioning testing and evaluation. Topics also include anaerobic and aerobic exercise prescriptions. The student gains a better understanding of exercise prescription, specifically anaerobic technique and prescription.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 260  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

  
  •  

    ATR 288 Level II Practicum 1

    1 Credit

      A clinical course whereby students participate in hands on learning experiences at various athletic training facilities. The student will be required to complete a minimum of 75 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and weekly completion of a goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience the student will make time to practice, demonstrate and become proficient in selected skills, identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the ATR 189 , Level I Practicum, and ATR 220 , Integrated Functional Anatomy for Athletic Training I. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students will utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 100 , ATR 189 , ATR 220 , and formal acceptance into the Athletic Training Major.


  
  •  

    ATR 289 Level II Practicum 2

    1 Credit

    In this clinical course, students participate in hands on learning experiences at various athletic training facilities. The student is required to complete a minimum of 75 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience the student make time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in selected skills, identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in ATR 240  , Strength and Conditioning, ATR 250 /ATR 255  , Prevention/Assessment of the Lower Extremity/Lab, and ATR 310  , Personal Health and Disease Prevention. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240 , ATR 250 /ATR 255 , ATR 288 , ATR 310  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

  
  •  

    ATR 310 Personal Health and Disease Prevention

    3 Credits

    The student is introduced to non-orthopedic related pathologies. Signs and symptoms of diseases and illness related to all of the body’s organs and systems will be discussed, along with treatment and appropriate referral. Covered topics will also include assessment procedures for general medical conditions and disease prevention.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 220  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

  
  •  

    ATR 320 Prevention/Assessment of the Upper Extremity

    3 Credits

    The goals of this course are to provide the student with a thorough understanding of orthopedic evaluation as well as common athletic injuries that are related to the upper extremity. Other topics of study include, but not limited to, specific conditions related to the upper extremity, systematic evaluation procedures, differential diagnosis, and documentation procedures. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments.

     

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255  , BIO 130 /BIO 135  or BIO 205 /BIO 215  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 325  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 206 /BIO 216 .

  
  •  

    ATR 325 Prevention/Assessment of the Upper Extremity Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 320  , Prevention and Assessment of the Upper Extremity, provides the student with practical techniques that are involved in preparing athletes for competition and evaluating athletes with medical conditions. The goals of the class are to provide the student with up-to-date understanding of the proper evaluation of injuries related to the regions of the Upper Extremity. At the conclusion of this laboratory course, the student is able to perform all assessment techniques for the Upper Extremity. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 250  ATR 255  , BIO 130  /BIO 135  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 320  , BIO 131  /BIO 136  or BIO 206  /BIO 216 .

  
  •  

    ATR 326 Special Topics in Athletic Training

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Athletic Training [ATR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Athletic Training that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students who have previously taken and successfully completed ATR 100 , Introduction to Athletic Training. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to ATR 100 , are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ATR 330 Therapeuticmodalities

    3 Credits

    Critical study of the physical and physiological techniques and problems associated with the safe and effective clinical use of therapeutic physical agents (including massage, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, and electricity). Critical thinking is emphasized by development of clinical rationales and problem solving.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 310  and BIO 130 /BIO 135  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

     


    Concurrent with: BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 206  /BIO 216  and ATR 335 

  
  •  

    ATR 335 Therapeuticmodalities Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 330 , Therapeutic Modalities, offers a critical study of the physical and physiological techniques and problems which are associated with the safe and effective clinical use of therapeutic physical agents (including massage, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, and electricity). Emphasis will be placed upon practical application of techniques, critical thinking, and problem solving.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 310  andBIO 130 /BIO 135  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

     

     

      Concurrent withBIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 206  /BIO 216  and ATR 330 .

  
  •  

    ATR 340 Therapeutic Exercise

    3 Credits

    In this course, students engage in a critical study of the physical and physiological techniques and problems that are associated with the safe and effective clinical use of therapeutic physical agents (including massage, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, and electricity), manual therapy techniques, and exercise in the rehabilitation of common injuries related to the physically active. The development of clinical rationales and problem solving skills are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255  , ATR 320 /ATR 325  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 345 .

  
  •  

    ATR 341 Therapeutic Exercise I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students engage in a critical study of the physical and physiological techniques and problems that are associated with the safe and effective clinical use of therapeutic physical agents (including massage, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, and electricity), manual therapy techniques, and exercise in the rehabilitation of common injuries related to the physically active. The development of clinical rationales and problem solving skills are emphasized.


    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 240  , ATR 250 /ATR 255  , ATR 330 /ATR 335  , BIO 130 /BIO 135  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 360 /ATR 365  .

  
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    ATR 342 Therapeutic Exerice II

    3 Credits

    In this course, a continuation of ATR 341, students engage in a critical study of the physical and physiological techniques and problems that are associated with the safe and effective clinical use of therapeutic physical agents for the development of therapeutic rehabilitation of sport related injuries to the upper extremity, hip and spine (including massage, heat, cold, hydrotherapy, and electricity), manual therapy techniques, and exercise in the rehabilitation of common injuries related to the physically active. The development of clinical rationales and problem solving skills are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 341  and ATR 360 /ATR 365  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 320 /ATR 325 .

  
  •  

    ATR 345 Therapeutic Exercise Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 340, Therapeutic Exercise, focuses on the application of techniques that are used in therapy and rehabilitation . The development of program design for exercise is also emphasized in this course. Topics of study include ROM, flexibility training, manual therapy techniques, and resistance training prescriptions, plyometric, PNF, aerobic conditioning, and balance training. The course also provides specific therapeutic protocols for all parts of the human body.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255  and ATR 320 /ATR 325  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with ATR 340 .

  
  •  

    ATR 350 Pharmacology for Athletic Trainers

    3 Credits

    An overview of patho-physiological concepts of injury, healing, and immunity followed by a critical look at pharmacology and its relationship to sports and exercise. Emphasis is placed upon integrating pharmacologic concepts into clinical practice. An examination of commonly used drugs and supplements that affect exercise performance and practical guidelines for the athletic trainer. Drug testing and prescription guidelines are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 310  , CHEM 101 /CHEM 111  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

  
  •  

    ATR 360 Prevention and Assessment of the Head, Thorax and Spine

    3 Credits

    In this demanding course, the student gains a working knowledge of the techniques that are involved in preparing athletes for competition and evaluating athletes with medical conditions. The goals of the class are to provide the student with up-to-date understanding of the proper evaluation of injuries related to the regions of the head, thorax, and spine. Other topics of study include, but not limited to, specific conditions related to the head, thorax, and spine, systematic evaluation procedures, differential diagnosis, and documentation procedures. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255  , BIO 130 /BIO 135  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 206  /BIO 216  (with a minimum grade of “C). Concurrent with: ATR 365.

  
  •  

    ATR 365 Prevention and Assessment of the Head, Thorax and Spine Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 360, Prevention and Assessment of the Head, Thorax, and Spine, provides the student with practical techniques that are involved in preparing athletes for competition and evaluating athletes with medical conditions. The goals of the class are to provide the student with up-to-date understanding of the proper evaluation of injuries related to the regions of the head, thorax, and spine. At the conclusion of this laboratory course, the student is able to perform all assessment techniques for the head, thorax and spine. As a measurable outcome of this course, the student must demonstrate success outcomes (70% or higher) on all exams and written assignments.

    Prerequisite(s):  ATR 250 /ATR 255 , BIO 130 /BIO 135  andBIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 206  /BIO 216  (with a minimum grade of “C) Concurrent with: ATR 360 .

  
  •  

    ATR 388 Level III Practicum 1

    1 Credit

    A clinical course whereby students participate in hands-on learning experiences at various athletic training facilities. The student is required to complete a minimum of 75 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as the daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience, the student makes time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in selected skills that are identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the ATR 250 /ATR 255 , Prevention/Assessment of the Lower Extremity/Lab, and ATR 330 /ATR 335 , Therapeutic Modalities/Lab. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students will utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255 , ATR 289 , and ATR 330 /ATR 335 .

 

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