May 18, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy) 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy)

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Theology (THEO)

  
  •  

    THEO 211 Clare of Assisi: A Leader Among Women

    3 Credits

    By studying the early sources by and about Clare, students come to understand her relation to Francis of Assisi and the Order of Friars Minor as well as the tensions present in religious life for women of the time. Clare emerges not only as the “little plant” of Francis, as she styled herself, but also as a “new leader of women” - a woman who continues to challenge us in this century.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 60 earned credits. 

  
  •  

    THEO 212 The Old Testament

    3 Credits

    Students engage in a detailed and in-depth investigation of Old Testament writings from literary, historical, and contemporary Christian faith perspectives. As part of this study of God’s self- communication in history, this course provides a critical understanding of and appreciation for the major figures and events of the Old Testament through a reading of selected passages from the Pentateuch, historical and prophetic books, and Wisdom Literature.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 60 earned credits. 

  
  •  

    THEO 213 The New Testament

    3 Credits

    The student is introduced to the New Testament through a literary and historical study of its writings from a contemporary Christian faith perspective. Included in this study are topics such as the origin of the writings, their formation and development, and the various types of interpretation. Students also analyze the distinctive theological and ethical views of New Testament authors who write about Jesus, his life, teachings, death, and resurrection.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

  
  •  

    THEO 214 Themes in Christian Scripture

    3 Credits

    This historical, literary, and contemporary survey of fundamental themes in Christian scripture is designed to foster a greater understanding of the relationship between the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament as they both influence contemporary Christian theology and living. Students come to understand the richness of scriptural wisdom through the study of such themes as creation, covenant, law, salvation, discipleship, the cross, resurrection, and love.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

  
  •  

    THEO 215 World Religions: Religion and Human Experience

    3 Credits

    In this study of religion as a universal human experience, the rich and diverse traditions of the world’s religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, are explored by using an interdisciplinary approach and representative readings.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

    Diversity-certified Course

  
  •  

    THEO 216 Contemporary Christianity: Roots and Routes

    3 Credits

    In this exploration of the reasons for the diversity and richness of today’s Christianity, topics include modern interpretations of the New Testament in relationship to the meaning of Jesus in early Christianity and today. How different Christian churches interpret the world; authority; religious truth; the roles of men and women; and worship are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 217 Contemporary Catholicism

    3 Credits

    Students critically examine and evaluate Catholic Christian identity in the modern world. Topics include such issues as faith development, christology, ecclesiology, soteriology, the lives of the saints in light of Vatican II, and the contributions of Noted Catholic authors.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 220 Sport and Spirituality

    3 Credits

    In this course, students explore the myriad of ways that sport can help all individuals become whole persons who are linked more closely with God. Topics of study include sportsmanship, selflessness, discipline, play, coaching, gender differences, competition, and community. By reflecting, reading, and discussing these content areas, students discover the connections among mind, body, and spirit that are inherent components of all sport.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 226 Special Topics in Theology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theology [THEO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an in-depth study of a particular theme, subject area, or individual of importance in the field of theology. Possible topics could include Christian thinkers in perspective or the development of the Gospels. Special Topics courses in Theology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified Prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Theology course at the 200-level or above, THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 301 Religion in America

    3 Credits

    By focusing on sociology, history, and theology, this course examines the religious teachings and practices in American life of such groups as Catholics, Protestants, Jews, American Indians, Mormons, Christian Scientists, and Shakers. Students are then assisted in linking American religious practice with their own career interests, e.g., health care, counseling, or business.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 310 Franciscan Impact in Contemporary Theology

    3 Credits

    This course has two objectives: (1) to describe and explain the general characteristics of Franciscan spirituality and (2) to interpret and evaluate current Christian faith and practice in relationship to the Franciscan tradition. Issues for discussion include feminist perspectives on Clare of Assisi, liberation theology, partnership in ministry, ongoing conversion, and being sister or brother to the earth.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 311 Christ: The Center of Franciscan Spirituality

    3 Credits

    The image, meaning, contemplation, and following of Christ in the principal writings of Francis, Clare, and later Franciscan theologians are examined in this course. This study of Christ is conducted in the context of the contemporary theology of Jesus, the Christ.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
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    THEO 312 Franciscan Dimensions of Peace and Justice

    3 Credits

    This interdisciplinary course explores the issues of peacemaking and reconciliation, advocacy for the poor, and concern for creation. Guided by the Franciscan philosophy and belief which embraces a reverent approach to all creation, consideration is given to the effects of violence as well as to ethical and political approaches to reducing violence in the world. Using examples of those who work in nonviolent ways, the course examines strategies for distributive justice.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.   

  
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    THEO 313 Second-generation Shapers of the Franciscan Movement

    3 Credits

    The development and history of the Franciscan tradition in the first centuries following Francis’ death are traced in this course. Through the writings of the men and women who shaped this history, students come in contact with such issues as poverty, clericalism, academics, mysticism, and the apocalyptic sense of mission. Anthony of Padua, Bonaventure of Bagnoregio, Angela of Foligno, Bernardine of Siena, and Colette of Corbie are some of the Franciscans whom students meet in their studies.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 315 Studies in the Franciscan School of Philosophy

    3 Credits

    The ideas and philosophers who made significant contributions to the origin and development of Franciscan philosophy are examined within the context of medieval thought. Such figures as Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, and Roger Bacon are studied. Themes to be treated include the nature of divine being, the relation of the soul to God, reason and faith, and the problem of universals. These themes are explored within the Franciscan tradition and are compared to the Thomistic tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.   

  
  •  

    THEO 320 Francis and the Environment

    3 Credits

    The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student to the theological, philosophical, and historical perspectives inherent in St. Francis’ perspective of the environment. Meeting this objective entails studying the four characteristics manifested in his character: his emulation of Christ, his devotion to poverty, his attempt to reform the rigidity of the feudal system, and his proclivity for living outdoors. These four aspects of his relationship with nature constitute the core of both the logical and affective element found in Franciscan consciousness. By examining the wisdom of St. Francis, students have the opportunity to examine contemporary issues of spirituality, ecofeminism, and deep ecology.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 326 Special Topics in Theology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theology [THEO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an in-depth study of a particular theme, subject area, or individual of importance in the field of theology. Possible topics could include Christian thinkers in perspective or the development of the Gospels. Special Topics courses in Theology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified Prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Theology course at the 200-level or above, THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 394-396 Cooperative Education

    Credit Varies

    Students are provided with a specific assignment within a diocese, parish, or affiliated agency involving progressive learning in a setting which fosters the application and integration of theological principles in both theory and practice. Progress and summary reports and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor are required. The student is evaluated by the faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must obtain sponsorship by a member of the Theology faculty. Course number varies with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of this catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop, THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.    

  
  •  

    THEO 426 Special Topics in Theology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theology [THEO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an in-depth study of a particular theme, subject area, or individual of importance in the field of theology. Possible topics could include Christian thinkers in perspective or the development of the Gospels. Special Topics courses in Theology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified Prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Theology course at the 200-level or above, THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of theology that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102 ,Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy and a minimum of 55 earned credits.


Public Safety Administration: Communication (PACOM)

  
  •  

    PACOM 100 Research and Writing for the Profession

    3 Credits

    This course enables students to practice and develop their writing, critical thinking, research and information literacy skills for a variety of academic and professional disciplines. Students are presented with strategies and skills for formal writing that are the foundation for communication and collaboration in public safety environments.

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Management (PAMGT)

  
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    PAMGT 200 Foundations of Public Safety Administration

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on values in public safety administration and the institutional foundations of public safety in political, bureaucratic, community settings. Major topics include dimensions of the public safety sector, characteristics of institutional settings, environmental context, and functions, roles, behaviors, and structures.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    PAMGT 300 Homeland Security and Emergency Management

    3 Credits

    This course provides the student with an introduction to the broad administrative perspective of homeland security and emergency management in the post-9/11 world. Topics include prevention, preparedness and planning, as well as readiness, response and recovery.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    PAMGT 310 Public Information Officers in Public Safety

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to the role of Public Information Officer (PIO). Topics include how to serve effectively as an organizational spokesperson, according to current practices in the profession of public relations with examples from the fire service, EMS and law enforcement environments. Particular emphasis will be placed on case studies in crisis communications and the role of the PIO in the incident command system. Students will learn about working with the media, writing press releases and speaking to the media in groups and interviews.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    PAMGT 320 Strategic Planning in Public Safety Administration

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to concepts of strategic planning and implementation in public safety environments. Students will engage in focused learning to distinguish strategic planning from other management skills, and provide them with techniques they can use in developing and implementing emergency preparedness programs.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    PAMGT 400 Leadership in Public Safety Administration

    3 Credits

    This course will explore the qualities and skills necessary of the public safety administration leader. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical foundations of leadership, the practical skills needed for leading while navigating and interacting in public safety organizations. Attention may also be given to developing comprehensive knowledge of the historical, social, political, global, and economic contexts within which public safety leaders’ work.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Theology (PATHE)

  
  •  

    PATHE 200 Ethics and Religious Diversity in Public Safety

    3 Credits

    Ethical dilemmas and religious diversity are constants in public safety administration. This course will introduce ethical theories and traditions of the five major world religions and begin the conversation regarding how they may impact the public safety administration environment.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Psychology (PAPSY)

  
  •  

    PAPSY 200 Group Dynamics in Public Safety

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the concepts and theories related to group dynamics and organizational psychology. Leadership styles and techniques will be introduced and discussed. Specifically, students will engage with material on organizational culture and structure, power and influence, motivation, groups and teams, conflict management, and dealing with change.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Politics (PAPOL)

  
  •  

    PAPOL 300 The Politics of Public Safety Administration

    3 Credits

    The field of public safety administration often involves a tension between political values and social values. This course will introduce various sources of historical and political issues and provides the context for further discussion and reflection as to how these elements impact public safety administration today.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Mathematics (PAMAT)

  
  •  

    PAMAT 400 Finance and Economics Issues in Public Safety

    3 Credits

    Finance and economic issues are examined from all three levels of government (national, state, and local). The complexity of public safety budgeting is explored and begins with an overview of the fundamental principles of public finance, including an examination of revenue sources including grants, and tax structures. Additionally, an overview is provided of paying for preparedness planning, training and response and budget preparation.

    Prerequisite(s): PACOM 100  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Public Safety Administration: Criminal Justice Leadership (PACJL)

  
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    PACJL 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice Leadership

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 200 Advanced Criminal Justice Leadership

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 220 Personnel Management for Criminal Justice I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 221 Personnel Management for Criminal Justice II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 240 Political and Legal Environment of Criminal Justice I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 241 Political and Legal Environment of Criminal Justice II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 260 Disaster Planning, Control and Recovery I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 261 Disaster Planning, Control and Recovery II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 300 Criminal Justice Capstone I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PACJL 301 Criminal Justice Capstone II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.  


Public Safety Administration: Fire/EMS Leadership (PAFEL)

  
  •  

    PAFEL 100 Introduction to Fire/EMS Leadership

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 200 Advanced Fire/EMS Leadership

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 220 Personnel Management for Fire and Emergency Management I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 221 Personnel Management for Fire and Emergency Management II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 240 Political and Legal Environment of Fire/EMS I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 241 Political and Legal Environment of Fire/EMS II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 260 Disaster Planning, Control and Recovery I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 261 Disaster Planning, Control and Recovery II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 300 Fire/EMS Capstone I

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    PAFEL 301 Fire/EMS Capstone II

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

 

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