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2013-2014 Graduate Catalog
Neumann University
   
 
  Nov 18, 2017
 
 
    
2013-2014 Graduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACT 510 Fraud and Society

    3 Credits

    This course examines the various legislative, administrative, and other societal remedies that have emerged in response to white-collar crime and investigates public and private sources that provide information on current issues in forensic accounting and fraud examination. Cases in securities fraud, pension fraud, environmental crimes, anti-trust violations, bribery, money laundering, and corporate governance will be discussed.

  
  •  

    ACT 520 Fraud Prevention and Forensic

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to fraud detection and deterrence and provides the tools necessary to combat fraud by focusing on basic fraud schemes, information and evidence gathering, criminal and civil prosecution and criminology and ethics



  
  •  

    ACT 530 White Collar Crime

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to financially motivated nonviolent crimes and examines the various types of white collar crimes that exist in society and how law enforcement identifies and investigates these crimes committed for illegal monetary gain.

  
  •  

    ACT 560 Ethics of Forensic Accounting

    3 Credits

    This course emphasis how allegations of fraud should be investigated to meet requirements of civil and/or criminal court procedures. A complete survey of the appropriate laws and the enforcement and regulatory agencies targeted toward this specialized crime problem will be made.

  
  •  

    ACT 580 Financial Statement Analysis and Fraud

    3 Credits

    This course emphasis how to determine financial statement frauds by examining how corporations engage in certain practices designed to hide or maneuver the accounts of a corporation. Compliance issues mandated by the Sarbanes Oxley Act (SOX) will be studied.

  
  •  

    ACT 640 Interview Techniques & The Legal Aspects of Fraud

    3 Credits

    This course emphasis how to strategically plan and execute effective interviews that are both skillful and ethical and examines recent legal issues related to interviewing in a fraud environment. Students will improve their ability to ask the right questions and detect deception in interviews.

  
  •  

    ACT 660 Research Design and Methods

    3 Credits

    This course familiarizes the student with methods of research and the design of research projects. Students critique research that has been completed in the field and discuss areas where research is needed. Selecting a topic and implementing the design of the project are required of each student.

  
  •  

    ACT 680 Capstone Seminar and Master’s Project

    3 Credits

    This course allows students to integrate prior course work and demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of forensic accounting and fraud detection. The master thesis is a Strategic Business Analysis and requires students to assess an organization’s ability to detect and deter fraudulent practices and examines the organization’s code of conduct with an ethical emphasis

  
  •  

    CIM 511 Information Assurance & Security

    3 Credits

    This course provides the student with an overview of the field of Information Security and Assurance. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of Security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Focuses on homeland security, information assurance, integrity, control, and privacy. Covers CNSS-4011 and NIST-800-16 standards.

  
  •  

    CIM 540 Computer Forensics

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and issues of computer forensics; aspects of computer and cybercrime; methods to uncover, protect, exploit, and document digital evidence; tools, techniques, and procedure to perform computer and cybercrime investigation. This course will introduce the topics of computer crime and computer forensics.


Doctor of Education

  
  •  

    EDU 700 Leadership in Education

    3 Credits

    Students examine the school administrator’s perspective on personnel administration. Students are taught the purposes, processes, planning procedures, and policies that are utilized in administering a school’s personnel program. Knowledge and skills are applied to performance- based evaluation procedures and the implementation of staff orientation processes. Effective communication skills with personnel, parents, and community members are also stressed. In addition, this course covers personnel matters which are governed by statutes under the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

  
  •  

    EDU 705 Ethical Issues in Educational Leadership: A Franciscan Perspective

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the Franciscan worldview in the Catholic tradition and the relationship of that worldview to educational leadership issues. The values and principles which guide ethical decision-making are studied, with the objective of teaching students how to develop principles and a process for examining those ethical issues that frequently confront educational leaders. Through personal reflection and an analysis of case studies, students acquire the ability to analyze, respond, and assess their responses to ethical dilemmas, such as making policy decisions; maintaining communication with community members and district administrators; as well as dealing with staff and student relations. This reflection on themes and ethical concerns serves as a foundation for other topics that will be raised and discussed throughout the program.

  
  •  

    EDU 725 Instructional Supervision

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the theoretical framework for effective instructional leadership. Techniques are studied for differentiated supervision of teaching and the evaluation of program quality. Strategies for developing and implementing staff development are also considered and analyzed. The historical development of instructional supervision as well as current trends in the field are examined in-depth, as are new state legislative and educational requirements and standards for curriculum and instruction. Students gain skills that support teachers in maintaining and increasing the effectiveness of their instructional practices with students from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

  
  •  

    EDU 726 Special Topics in Graduate Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Education [EDU] that reflect specific areas of study that are not part of the Doctor of Education program curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by three-digit numeric designation [EDU _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
  •  

    EDU 730 Contemporary Issues in Education and Educational Leadership

    3 Credits

    Students analyze instructional leadership in the context of historic and current influences on education and teaching practices. As part of their studies, students examine leading educational theories, the development of the United States’ public school systems, as well as cultural and political trends as a means of enhancing their understanding of contemporary educational issues and how those issues can be most effectively addressed.

  
  •  

    EDU 735 Development Of Curriculum and Instruction

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the principles of curriculum development, implementation protocols, and methods of evaluation that are utilized to analyze and improve educational practice. Students learn to design and implement curricular projects, to interpret curriculum-related data, and to generate solutions to curricular problems. Students also learn to incorporate inclusive practices within the context of the curriculum improvement process.

  
  •  

    EDU 740 Organizational Development and Change Theory

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the foundational knowledge of organizational development and educational planning as it relates to the effective management of change, team building, as well as community and media relations.

  
  •  

    EDU 745 Fiscal Management in the Educational Environment

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with an overview of the economic processes and variables which impact school finance. The role of federal, state, county, district, and other school funding sources are emphasized. Issues of equity as well as the relationship between taxpayer funding and student achievement are also examined. Through their studies, students gain experience in budget planning and resource allocation at both the district and school levels.

  
  •  

    EDU 750 School Code and School Board Policies

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the legal principles and standards governing public and private education, with a focus on those related to legally defensible administrative policies and practices as set forth by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its Department of Education. Students analyze federal and state laws and regulations, the development of and mandates of state school codes, and the school administrator’s role in the development and implementation of local school board policies.

  
  •  

    EDU 755 School Business Management

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the theoretical concepts and practical skills that are necessary for successful district-wide business administration are examined in this course. Emphasis is placed upon planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating budgets so that state, local, and federal funds can be allocated appropriately. State and local systems of financing schools and their budget cycles are also studied. In addition, students prepare and analyze financial reports for the purpose of strategic planning for school improvement.

  
  •  

    EDU 760 Leading and Managing in the School Environment

    3 Credits

    Students identify administrative responsibilities and goals and are taught how these responsibilities are executed and how these goals are achieved. Students gain insight into the school environment and develop plans, as needed, for staff induction, support, and professional development.

  
  •  

    EDU 765 Strategic Planning for the Diverse Learning and Teaching Environment

    3 Credits

    Students apply current frameworks to critical analyses of multicultural education and strategies for educating students with special needs in the context of managing educational organizations. Students examine major federal legislation and related case law pertaining to educating students with special needs, including NCLB, IDEA, ADA, and Section 504 of RA. Students also examine and evaluate federal, state, district, and site-based funding allocations required to address the needs of students with special needs and exceptionalities. This knowledge enables students to better understand the role and responsibilities of school administrators in light of legislative mandates and case law affecting special education programs.

  
  •  

    EDU 770 Qualitative Research

    3 Credits

    Students receive an overview of ethnographic, case study, and action research methods in order to prepare themselves for conducting qualitative research for both this course and for their dissertation. Data collection and analysis procedures are also introduced. Students create a qualitative research proposal, plan and execute data collection methods, and conduct data analysis for a semester-long action research project that culminates in a final paper and the presentation of findings.

  
  •  

    EDU 775 Catholic School Leadership and Education

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with the knowledge and skills needed to administer Catholic schools and to advance Catholic education in this country, as well as to understnad the mission and history of Catholic education, with a focus on Catholic schooling in the United States, is critically examined. Based upon the Catholic vision of education, students investigate, from an ethical perspective, the anthropological, cultural, and sociological factors which affect both Catholic and non-Catholic schools.

  
  •  

    EDU 776 The Principal as Instructional Leader

    3 Credits

    Students investigate, analyze, and evaluate instructional leadership strategies and best practices that are appropriate for elementary and secondary school principals in the diverse multicultural environments of 21st-century PK–12 environments. The traits, behaviors, and theories of effective instructional leadership are emphasized. Through the application of research to contemporary instructional leadership issues, students develop a foundation appropriate for their role as instructional leaders.

  
  •  

    EDU 777 The Superintendent as Instructional Leader

    3 Credits

    Students investigate school leadership strategies and practices of organization, supervision, and management which are appropriate to K–12 school districts. Students are provided with an analysis and an overview of the nature, functions, and activities of the public school superintendent, including a study of historical and philosophical foundations, school board relations and functions, professional staff relations and management, public relations and communication, community relations and responsibilities, as well as the functions of planning, direction, and supervision of the entire instructional enterprise as it relates to organizational management.

  
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    EDU 780 Quantitative Research

    3 Credits

    Students examine the fundamental concepts, statistical analyses, and applications of quantitative methods commonly used in educational research are examined in this course. Content areas of study include testing the null hypothesis; random subject sampling; descriptive statistics; calculating statistical and practical significance; multiple regression analysis; and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). In addition, students work with a variety of databases, including those used in intervention and large-scale policy research, as well as in program evaluation. The culminating goal of this course is to have students successfully identify and apply the appropriate data collection procedures and statistical applications to specific research questions that require quantitative methods. The skills that are learned through this data collection and statistical applications process are, then, utilized to prepare students to write a quantitative research proposal.

  
  •  

    EDU 799 Comprehensive Examination

    4.5 Credits

    A student presents an acceptable research topic and creates a dissertation proposal according to the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership program’s Dissertation Guidelines.  This dissertation proposal is presented to a panel of faculty members appointed by the Program Director.  If the dissertation proposal is deemed, by the panel, to be acceptable, the student attains degree candidate status and may progress to EDU 810 .

    Pass/Fail
    This examination is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.
    In order to pass, a student must successfully complete each component of the examination. A student may retake only once any failed examination component.
  
  •  

    EDU 800 Principal Internship

    6 Credits

    This internship consists of a 12-month-long field experience of a minimum of 360-hour “job- embedded” activities supported by the on-site mentoring of an experienced principal and the supervision of a University Internship Supervisor. Of the 360 required hours, 180 hours will be completed while school is in session. Throughout the internship, the student will complete the role expectations and competencies identified in the guidelines of the PA Leadership Standards.

  
  •  

    EDU 801 Superintendent’s Letter of Eligibility Internship

    6 Credits

    This internship consists of a 12-month-long field experience of a minimum of 360-hour “job- embedded” activities supported by the on-site mentoring of a superintendent and the supervision of a University Internship Supervisor. Of the 360 required hours, 180 hours will be completed while school is in session. Throughout the internship, the student will complete the role expectations and competencies identified in the guidelines of the PA Leadership Standards.

  
  •  

    EDU 810 Dissertation Seminar I

    4.5 Credits

    A degree candidate, with the approval of his/her dissertation committee, submits a research proposal, created according to the Guidelines for the Preparation of Research Proposals for IRB Review, to the IRB for review and approval.  After the research proposal has been approved by the IRB, a dissertation proposal is defended before the degree candidate’s dissertation committee and the Program Director.  If the dissertation proposal is deemed by the degree candidate’s dissertation committee and the Program Director to be acceptable, the degree candidate may progress to EDU 820 .

  
  •  

    EDU 820 Dissertation Seminar II

    4.5 Credits

    A degree candidate. under the guidance of his/her dissertation committee, conducts the approved research study.  The degree candidate, on a periodic basis throughout the semester, provides and update of the study’s progress to the dissertation committee chairperson.   

  
  •  

    EDU 826 Special Topics in Graduate Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Education [EDU] that reflect specific areas of study that are not part of the Doctor of Education program curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by three-digit numeric designation [EDU _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
  •  

    EDU 880 Independent Study

    Credit Varies

    Students seeking individualized advanced study in some area of education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Program Director, meeting all conditions of the University’s ISP Policy, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
  •  

    EDU 900 Doctoral Dissertation

    4.5 Credits

    With guidance from their Dissertation Committee Chairperson and committee members, students complete their research and write their dissertation. When a student’s dissertation is completed and has received the Dissertation Committee Chairperson’s approval, it is defended before the committee and other members of the faculty.

  
  •  

    EDU 910 Dissertation Continuation

    3 Credits

    Students who have completed EDU 900  but need more time to complete their dissertation must register for this course and, by doing so, are granted Dissertation Continuation status. Students are permitted to register for Dissertation Continuation status for a maximum of three continuous semesters, after which time, the Program Director, in consultation with the student’s Dissertation Committee Chairperson, determines the student’s standing in the program, which includes the dissolution of the Dissertation Committee or the student’s permanent non-continuation in the Program.

    Pass/Fail
    This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.
  
  •  

    EDU 926 Special Topics in Graduate Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Education [EDU] that reflect specific areas of study that are not part of the Doctor of Education program curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by three-digit numeric designation [EDU _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.


Master of Science in Education

  
  •  

    EDU 500 Philosophical Foundations for Instructional Leadership

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the development of theoretical-pragmatic foundations for reflective teaching and educational leadership in collaborative school environments. Philosophical systems are examined as they relate to the realities of classroom instructional leadership.

  
  •  

    EDU 505 Teaching to Diversity

    3 Credits

    The American classroom is a study in diversity and commonality. This course establishes a congruence between the expectations and styles of teachers and learners based upon diversity issues within the context of human nature.

  
  •  

    EDU 506 School Policy and Law

    3 Credits

    In this course, the philosophical bases and legal structures of educational policymaking are studied. Students, as educators, develop their own philosophies of education and examine the underlying philosophical assumptions of major educational policies and practices. The course also prepares teachers to understand the legal structures that determine educational policies and how issues of equity affect the implementation of those policies. This level of understanding is necessary in order for teachers to be knowledgeable and active decision makers in their own classrooms, schools, and communities.

  
  •  

    EDU 507 The Principalship

    3 Credits

    Since the inception of formal education, the principal’s roles and responsibilities have changed over time. The definitions of a headmaster or principal have traditionally focused on the administrative processes and functions that must be emphasized in order for schools to work well. Effective principals are generally responsible for scheduling, organizing, controlling, and leading their schools. Gradually, however, this list of tasks and roles has given way to a list of competencies and proficiencies as the favored way to map out the territory of the principal. In this course, students investigate and learn the required proficiencies and other related administrative roles of the principal.

  
  •  

    EDU 508 Fiscal and Facility Management

    3 Credits

    The principal is acknowledged as the instructional leader of a school. However, to effectively support the school’s educational program, a principal must also be able to manage the necessary array of available resources. This course explores fiscal and facility management, as well as instructional resources and resource management plans. Students examine contemporary research in site-based management/shared decision-making, research-driven instructional models. Students also learn to develop and select appropriate assessment instruments, as they focus on the role of the principal in the budget process, which includes the development of needs assessments for personnel and the school plant. Maintaining an environment conducive to teaching and learning is an integral component of the knowledge and skills which are presented in this course.

  
  •  

    EDU 509 Administration and Staff Development

    3 Credits

    This course provides students with an understanding of the selection, employment, orientation, supervision, development, and evaluation of both professional and nonprofessional personnel who make up the staff of the school. The principal’s role in collective bargaining and the implementation of a collective bargaining agreement are also topics of study. Special emphasis is placed upon the principal’s role in the ongoing development of the professional staff involvement in community organizations and professional organizations.

  
  •  

    EDU 510 Research Design and Methods

    3 Credits

    Analytical foundations for conducting action research are established in this course. Basic statistics, language of research, and methods of analysis are applied to the study of an actual teaching/learning phenomenon.

  
  •  

    EDU 520 Curriculum Designand Evaluation

    3 Credits

    Students examine the theoretical application of curriculum design within the context of contemporary American classrooms. Relationships among subject matter, teaching, learning, and assessments are viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective.

  
  •  

    EDU 525 Introduction to Exceptionalities

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the current research and practice concerning the range of exceptionalities in children. Through a study of policies, legislation, programs, and methods that impact special education programs, students develop an in-depth understanding of the goals of inclusion with regard to universal design, multiculturalism, and collaboration. They also learn to identify and assess the pertinence of the six principles associated with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This increased knowledge enables them to distinguish among the common characteristics that are associated with a variety of exceptionalities and how these characteristics impact the educational environment.

  
  •  

    EDU 526 Special Topics in Graduate Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study that are not part of the standard University curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by three-digit numeric designation [EDU _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
  •  

    EDU 530 Pedagogy of Cognition: Prenatal to Nine

    3 Credits

    Child Development and Cognition is one of a series of two courses designed to investigate the theory and experience of children in the perceptual, motor, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral domains of development. This course specifically addresses these constructs from prenatal to nine years of age. Additionally, the application of the principles and theories of child development and learning in order to promote responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment in the classroom is studied. Students also examine early screening and assessment tools that are currently utilized in the field; for example, OUNCE, ASQ-3, and Work Sampling. A practicum, which consists of 12 hours per semester of field experience, is a required component of this course. Through this practicum, students learn observation, assessment, and record keeping skills.

  
  •  

    EDU 531 Language Development and the English Language Learner

    3 Credits

    This course examines the theoretical basis of language development by way of constructivism grounded in the work of Piaget, Skinner, and Vygotsky. Students are taught the elements of language acquisition and their impact on content learning in order to meet the needs of English Language Learners in today’s diverse classrooms. The framework for the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) are presented and discussed. Pre-service teachers are also taught the structure of language development and learn to deliver quality lessons that allow English Language Learners to acquire academic knowledge.

  
  •  

    EDU 532 Integrating Curriculum and Instruction with the Arts for the Developing Child

    3 Credits

    The theoretical perspectives of curriculum development in early and elementary classrooms are examined in this course. These perspectives are, then, used to analyze curricula and make informed choices when planning instruction, selecting instructional materials, and assessing individual and group progress. This course also prepares the student to develop the reflective teaching skills that are needed to work with English Language Learners from Pre-K to Grade 4. Students must demonstrate their understanding of learning as a process that integrates all areas of the development of children from birth to age 8 that include emotional, social, language, cognitive, physical, and creative, and utilize a variety of instructional strategies so that all children can become interested and engaged in learning. Students must also be able to demonstrate their understanding of how they combine relationships with children and families, develop effective approaches to teaching and learning, and show knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning. They also develop knowledge of theory and research on creativity and utilize these skills to integrate the meaningful use of arts processes and content to introduce, develop, or bring closure to lessons in all academic areas.

  
  •  

    EDU 533 Reading Methods Through Differentiated Instruction

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the foundations for early literacy learning and the instructional strategies for teaching beginning reading and writing from Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 4. Students investigate all aspects of the literacy curriculum while demonstrating efficient differentiated instructional activities. Students learn about teaching young children before the age of formal instruction. An emphasis is placed upon effective and developmentally appropriate strategies for young children. Issues are examined that impact literacy learning such as diversity, home-school connections, the role of play in learning, creating a print rich environment, and oral language development. Sound instructional strategies for developing beginning readers and writers in Grades 2 through 4 are taught. Methodologies for systematic and direct instruction in reading, developmentally appropriate instruction in the mechanics and process of writing, the assessments of language arts skills, the remediation of struggling readers, and the instruction of ELL learners are integral parts of this course. Students also learn to identify and plan instruction for students with learning differences, as well as develop instructional strategies and appropriate learning environments for students in inclusive settings.

  
  •  

    EDU 534 Mathematical Foundations: Preschool to Grade Four (inclusive Strategies)

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the teaching of mathematics to children of ages Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 4. The course examines methodologies appropriate to the physical and cognitive developmental stages of these children, and provides students with opportunities to gain confidence in teaching math concepts developmentally appropriate at this level. Students gain an understanding of the academic and functional performance needs of young learners with disabilities by identifying and planning instruction for learning differences, and developing instructional strategies that are appropriate learning environments for young learners in inclusive settings, utilizing mathematics as a core content theme.

  
  •  

    EDU 535 Science and Social Studies Methods (pk-4)

    3 Credits

    In the Science Methods component of this course, students explore science theory, practice, and pedagogy based upon children’s cognitive development that is appropriate at the PK-4 levels. Contemporary science education research and practice are examined, as articulated in the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology, Environment and Ecology (STEE), STEE Anchor Assessments Benchmarks for Science Literacy, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and The National Science Education Standards, published by the National Research Council. The Social Studies Methods component of this course is designed to provide students with social science concepts that are taught in the early childhood and elementary classroom settings as well as the various teaching methodologies for the teaching of these concepts. This course helps prepare teacher candidates to become effective social studies educators who are capable of teaching elementary students from PK- Grade 4 the content knowledge, the intellectual skills, and the civic values necessary for fulfilling the responsibilities of citizenship in a participatory democracy. Special attention is given to effective teaching strategies and to addressing the individual and cultural diversity of all learners. Through a thematic approach with science, students review the social studies curriculum as it relates to learning and development, differences in learning styles, critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills, active learning and motivation, inquiry, collaboration and supportive classroom interaction, instructional planning, assessment, reflection and professional growth, and professional leadership (based upon pedagogical standards identified by the National Council for the Social Studies). Strategies for engaging and empowering young learners to become active, democratic citizens are also presented.

  
  •  

    EDU 536 Intensive Reading and Writing in a Least Restrictive Environment

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain an understanding of intensive instructional strategies in reading and writing in a least restrictive environment. Students demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the components of reading and writing and describe how these areas pose challenges for students in a PK-Grade 4 least restrictive environment. They are also taught to clearly articulate and model the use of explicit and systematic instruction in the teaching of literacy for students with disabilities across all reading levels and to identify evidence-based instructional practices that help students with disabilities succeed with reading and writing in a least restrictive class setting.

  
  •  

    EDU 546 Assessment Methods: Summative Formative, Diagnostic and Benchmark

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
  •  

    EDU 547 Foundations of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain understanding of the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of early intervention of autism, characteristics and etiology of autism, and assessment and identification of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This course will include a field experience in classrooms serving students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  
  •  

    EDU 548 Teaching Strategies Seminar I: Subject Matter Applications

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for those who are entering the teaching profession from the business world and do not possess a teaching certificate. The cognitive process of instruction is taught with particular emphasis on developing learning strategies in skill subjects. Learning plans with outcome measures are designed and implemented.

  
  •  

    EDU 549 Instructional Strategies and Curriculum for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain understanding of educational environments, instructional activities, and teaching methods which prove effective for teaching students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This course will include a field experience in classrooms serving students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 547 

  
  •  

    EDU 550 Assessment and Instructional Planning for Students with Autism

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain understanding of assessment approaches and instructional planning for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Techniques include functional behavioral analysis, applied behavior analysis, and accommodations and adaptations to state- and district-wide assessments. This course will include a field experience in classrooms serving students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 547 

  
  •  

    EDU 551 Collaborative Relationships for Students with Autism

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain understanding of a variety of collaborative relationships needed for successful education of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. These collaborative relationships include: families of ASD students, school personnel, interdisciplinary collaboration, and interagency collaboration. Course will include service delivery formats, communication, and transition. This course will include a field experience in collaborative settings and with organizations serving students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 547 

  
  •  

    EDU 552 Assistive Technology for Students with Special Needs

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain understanding of the technology used to help the instructional, language, and social needs of students with disabilities.

     

  
  •  

    EDU 558 Teaching Strategies Seminar II: Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    3 Credits

    This course emphasizes strategies for creating inclusionary classroom climates. Approaches for accommodating differently abled learners in collaborative settings are presented and critiqued. Modifications of these settings are then formulated and applied.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 525 .

  
  •  

    EDU 560 Graduate Seminar

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to be taken as a supplement to EDU 575 , Practicum in Teaching: Early Childhood/Elementary/Secondary Education. Time is allotted for students to share their student teaching experiences in an effort to process issues, problems, successes, and areas which are in need of improvement. Portions of the course are devoted to the presentation and sharing of information regarding the teaching profession in order to adequately prepare students to be viable candidates for employment.

  
  •  

    EDU 568 Classroom Management: Behavioral Disorders and Social/Emotional Disorders

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to current theories, research, and practice concerning behavior management and the pertinence of proactive behavioral management plans in the classroom setting. Students are presented with an overview of the basic precepts of applied behavior analysis. In addition, attention is given to formal behavior assessment, functional behavior assessment, methodology, curriculum-based assessment, as well as positive supports and legal issues. Through this study, students develop a more in-depth understanding of the goals of inclusion as they relate to universal design, multiculturalism, and collaboration.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 525 .

  
  •  

    EDU 570 Constructivist Perspectives in Reading

    3 Credits

    Using the contructivist model of learning, the study and application of linguistics, reading theory, the nature of reading, current practices, and materials of instruction are examined. Skills include grouping plans, work attack strategies, and critical reading.

  
  •  

    EDU 575 Practicum in Teaching: Early Childhood/Elementary/Special Education

    3 Credits

    Students who are seeking teacher certification, experience actual teaching under approved supervision, including necessary observation, participation, and conferencing. Regular seminars on campus help the student to analyze teaching situations and plan for effective teaching.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passing of all Pennsylvania Department of Education required tests.

  
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    EDU 576 Special Education Practicum/Internship

    3 Credits

    This Special Education Practicum/Internship is a 180-hour culminating classroom experience which is designed for certificated teachers who are seeking Special Education Certification. Portions of the course are devoted to the presentation and sharing of information regarding current issues in Special Education, verification of practical experiences with curriculum and instruction, and the provision of documentation for performance activities that contribute both to the satisfaction of standards and to the instructional time requirements for this practicum/internship experience. As part of this course, students are also allotted time to share their teaching experiences in an effort to process issues, problems, successes, and areas that are in need of improvement. Additionally, students are provided with the opportunity to establish a plan to meet the certification requirements and Special Education Standards as set forth by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

  
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    EDU 577 Principal Certification Internship

    6 Credits

    The professional literature and national groups which study the professional development of principals all recommend an intern-type experience. The Pennsylvania Department of Education requires such a culminating experience, since practical hands-on development of a principal is the primary key to success. This course, therefore, involves working with a mentor principal ideally within the student’s own school district. As part of this course, an action plan, which must be approved by the course professor, is developed with the student’s mentor principal. A major component of this action plan includes a research problem that is real and needs resolution within the cooperating school or school district. This internship may not be attempted until the candidate has successfully completed the required courses for certification and has fulfilled all state testing requirements.

  
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    EDU 580 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified graduate students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
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    EDU 590 Teaching for Divergent Thinking: Classroom Management

    3 Credits

    In this classroom management course, the causes of student behavior and misbehavior are examined. Once these causes have been identified and understood, students explore ideas for establishing a good classroom environment which is needed to overcome classroom problems. Various motivational and teaching techniques that stimulate a positive approach to discipline are studied.

  
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    EDU 597 Internet for Teachers

    3 Credits

    Internet for Teachers is designed to provide additional support for students who wish to go beyond the fundamentals of using the Internet to access and share information. The course focuses on the Internet as a professional resource and communication medium, as well as a reference tool for students. In addition, the use of web-based Internet tools for delivering instruction via the Internet and the use of the Internet as a publishing medium are studied. Students are also taught how this technology can be used as an instructional tool in a constructivist learning environment. This course subscribes to two fundamental beliefs: (1) that the learner may choose from a rich and varied menu of learning experiences and possibilities; and, (2) that the learner must take responsibility for planning, acting, and growing.

  
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    EDU 598 Advanced Strategies in Technology and Assessment

    3 Credits

    The applications of technology to classroom assessments and interventions are explored in-depth with practical applications. Readings and projects address the implications of educational software(courseware), Internet access, and state-of-the-art technology in instructional planning and classroom management.

  
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    EDU 599 Collaborative Teaching: Family Collaboration, Communication, and Community Relationships

    3 Credits

    When families, community, and school staff work together to support student learning, the results are powerful! Effective collaboration among these groups can yield results that mutually support each segment of the education community, especially the students. In this course, the complex characteristics of family units and communities are studied. Students, then, utilize that knowledge to create and sustain respectful, reciprocal relationships which support, empower, and involve families at all levels of their children’s development and learning. Students also develop strategies to increase family and community involvement in their schools and learn communicative processes between parents and professionals who work with students with disabilities in all areas of collaborative involvement.

  
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    EDU 626 Special Topics in Graduate Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study that are not part of the standard University curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by three-digit numeric designation [EDU _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

  
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    EDUC 512 Wellness: Research, Practices and Policies for Teachers and Students

    3 Credits

    There is a growing body of research noting correlation between academic success and the emotional, physical health of students. Given the growing importance of attending to the whole child, this course has been developed to increase K-12 educators’ knowledge of health and wellness practices and research. The course will ask participants to assess their own beliefs and practices in health and wellness and will encourage a self-change model. The course is based on two theoretical structures: one being that wellness is composed of physical, emotional, mental, social and spiritual health. The second structure is Erickson’s stages of development and their usage in directing our choices for growth throughout our lives.

     

  
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    EDUC 518 Transformation Education: Effectiveness to Greatness

    3 Credits

    Education continues to face significant change. The challenges and complexity we face in education ranges from high tech to high touch (relationship) responsibilities. We seek to make our classrooms and curriculum relevant and effective. Being effective is no longer optional it is mandatory. The needs to thrive, innovate, excel, and lead call for greatness. We must transform education and tap into new dimensions of human genius and motivation. In this inspiring course you will be given the tools to explore your voice, your creativity, new mindsets, new skills, and new habits. You will find your voice and inspire your students to find theirs.

     

  
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    EDUC 524 Building a Classroom Community

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to address the most critical issues in schools today - climate and community. Respect for self and others have been documented by research over the past twenty-five years as being lacking in children with developmental, behavioral and learning problems. It is impossible to teach and learn successfully in an environment that is less than safe. Educators K through 12 are invited to participate in this highly experiential classroom community-building course. Students will work through a developmental program designed to identify, model and practice strategies for team, group, and community building, self-respect and social skill building.

  
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    EDUC 527 The Reality of Bullying and Hazing in Schools: Awareness and Intervention Strategies

    3 Credits

    While bullies continue to plague K-12 campuses, the hazing rampant among sports teams, clubs, and student organizations remains an underappreciated issue. The Reality of Bullying and Hazing in Schools analyzes the dynamic relationships between victim, bystander, and perpetrator, along with the organic and inorganic systems that support the continuation of bullying and hazing behaviors. This course combines the latest adolescent psychological theories and science with practical intervention strategies administrators and teachers can implement immediately.

  
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    EDUC 537 Increasing Student Engagement: “The Heart and Soul of a Successful Classroom”

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to have participants experience and develop strategies for improving student engagement in their classrooms. Particular emphasis will be placed on activities and strategies for developing, maintaining and increasing student engagement and ultimately student achievement. Students will examine and adopt a set of total participation techniques and movement activities for the classroom. They will share our individual expertise, explore current research and draw upon collective experiences and talents to build a collection of strategies that will ensure increased student engagement in your classroom.

  
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    EDUC 540 Inclusion

    3 Credits

    This course will prepare participants to balance the ever increasing responsibilities of educating
    a continually changing, diverse learning population. Particular emphasis will be
    placed on inclusion of various special needs students; including those with physical, emotional,
    mental and social differences. Teachers will develop the investigative, decision-making and
    reflective teaching skills needed to work with all diverse learners. They will experientially work
    on increasing engagement and student achievement. The role of assessment and evaluation
    will also be included. This experiential course will challenge participants physically, socially,
    mentally and emotionally.
     

  
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    EDUC 550 Helping to Guide Students through Loss and Life Transitions

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to help teachers and school counselors understand and support students who are dealing with loss or significant changes in their lives. Graduate students will explore the common experience of students who have experienced loss and/or significant change and how the response of school professionals can help or hinder these students as they adjust to a new life. Understanding the needs of grieving students and the impact of loss on their academic, emotional, social and behavioral functioning allows us to respond in ways that can significantly help in their healing process.

  
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    EDUC 555 Experiential Education and Facilitation Skills

    3 Credits

    Experiential education has its roots in ancient history when all students were primarily taught through the modeling and practice of important life skills. This form of learning is
    an active, creative, “doing” mode of acquiring skills that can and will be used long after the initial individuals role of student has concluded. This class will use a “laboratory
    for learning” format. An experiential learning cycle with emphasis on experiencing, sharing, processing, learning, and application will be followed. Students will practice this
    format for the learning of curricular content and social skill development.
     

  
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    EDUC 564 Enhancing Brain Development in Children

    3 Credits

    Are the brains of children different today than they were in the past? According to research and the observations of many educators, the answer is a resounding “yes”. Why do we feel disconnected in a connected world? Is your brain on overload? Do you find yourself too stressed to distress? What about your students? This course is based on the readings of many current related books and articles that address this question. The goal of the course is to help teachers, administrators, support staff, and parents understand how brains develop, what they need to develop, why they are different, and what parents and educators can do to enhance development and counteract the effects of our fast paced society.

  
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    EDUC 565 Differentiate Instruction with Understanding by Design

    3 Credits

    This course provides helpful, practical, and research based techniques for creation of a stimulating, effective classroom for all students at all levels. Participants will assess their own level of implementation of differentiated instruction, and learn how to use the understanding by design framework to deliver the curriculum to all students. Knowledge of the characteristics of students who learn at different paces and levels will be explored. Participants will study a variety of curriculum options, such as those of content, process, and product and learning styles, that further assists the implementation of differentiated lessons to optimize learning for all students, including ELL, special needs and gifted students.

  
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    EDUC 574 Cultivating 21st Century Skills: Whole Brain Learning

    3 Credits

    Success in the 21st century belongs to different learners with a very different kind of mind. The 21st century calls for creators, empathizers, artists, inventors, designers, storytellers, caregivers, counselors, and big-picture thinkers. This course will help you move your students from the information age, built on logical, linear, computer-like capabilities to the conceptual age which will be built on invention, empathy, and big picture capability. You will be immersed in six essential aptitudes as researched by Daniel Pink and Daniel Goleman: design, story, symphony, empathy, play, and meaning. Project based learning and classroom integration will be emphasized throughout the course.

  
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    EDUC 583 Character Education: Social Emotional Learning

    3 Credits

    This Course is designed to help teachers develop students of character using classic pieces of literature, research in social and emotional learning, and character education. Through in-depth mental, emotional, physical, social and spiritual study, students will examine the pillars of character education and the great teachers of human history. Participants will practice and discuss the lessons the wisest of our ancestral scholars have to teach us today. The graduate students will be asked to be self-reflective and involved in all experiential learning


  
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    EDUC 584 Multiple Intelligences – Real Genius at Play

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to have participants experience the multiple intelligences as researched by Gardener, Armstrong and Buzan. Particular emphasis will be placed on activities, experiential learning and strategies for developing logic, linguistics, music, spatial, kinesthetic, natural, interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. The course will include assessments, resources and challenging growth opportunities. Students will celebrate intelligence strengths and provide interventions in areas of weakness. They will also explore the human characteristics of genius and draw from ten historical figures as role models for our class discussions.

  
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    EDUC 585 7 Habits for Effective Educators

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to help educators become more effective in their personal and professional lives, thus enhancing the lives of their students. We will use Stephen R. Coveys, # 1 National Bestseller, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People as the framework for the course. Concepts of study include: personal growth, interpersonal leadership, empathetic communication, creative cooperation and balanced self-renewal. There will be an emphasis on how these concepts transcend into our classrooms and provide the foundation for how we embrace teaching and learning. Students will examine how our habits shape our lives and define our character. They will explore our current level of stress and how our viewpoints on our circle of influence vs. circle of control affect the outcome of each situation. Participants will examine how continuous learning is part of what keeps us feeling empowered in our relationships and accomplished in our work. Through highly engaging, interactive and reflective activities, this course is bound to transform the lives of each participant, while simultaneously, giving them tools to take back to their classrooms.

  
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    EDUC 587 Closing the Achievement Gap

    3 Credits

    The course is designed to help teachers, administrators, and support staffs eliminate the achievement gap. The goal of the course is to present a comprehensive K-12 model that ensures racial and social differences in academic achievement are eliminated. The program will focus on the academic, social and emotional learning skills that improve achievement for all students. Our primary philosophy is respect, responsibility and relationships that are essential for academics to be relevant to all learners. Until we address the relevance of academics to all learners we can never be successful with academic rigor.


Nursing

  
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    NUR 526 Special Topics in Graduate Nursing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Graduate Nursing [NUR] that reflect specific topics of study that are not part of the standard University curriculum. All Special Topics courses are identified by a three-digit numeric designation [NUR _26]. The first digit indicates the level of graduate study for a particular course, while the numeric designation of “26” indicates that the course is a Special Topics course. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Nursing and Health Sciences.

  
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    NUR 530 Theories of Learning

    3 Credits

    The structure, assumptions, and concepts underlying historic and current learning theories are analyzed in this course, with an emphasis placed upon theoretical applications. Students also develop teaching strategies that are grounded in learning/educational theory and evidence-based teaching practice.

  
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    NUR 540 Models of Teaching and Instruction

    3 Credits

    Students examine instructional models that facilitate learning in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings. Strategies to promote the achievement of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes are also explored in the context of evidence-based research; learner needs and abilities; outcomes; content; and environment.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 530 .

  
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    NUR 550 Curriculum Design

    3 Credits

    Students integrate educational philosophy and the principles, theories, and research of nursing and education in the process of curriculum development. Trends in nursing and health care, as well as community and societal needs related to curricular design, are explored. Students collaborate in the development of a nursing curriculum, reinforcing the process and skills that are intrinsic to curriculum development and/or revision.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 530 .

  
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    NUR 560 Instructional Technology

    3 Credits

    Students explore the applications of technology to program development, curriculum design, instructional strategies, evaluation, and resource utilization. This course also examines the use of computer-based instruction, distance learning, media, the World Wide Web, simulation, and other state-of-the-art technologies to promote learning.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 530 .

  
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    NUR 570 Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education

    3 Credits

    Students examine assessment and evaluation methods to measure student learning and program outcomes. Emphasis is placed upon the development of grading rubrics, test construction and analysis, and clinical evaluations which are unique to nursing education and practice. The social, legal, and ethical issues in grading, assessment, evaluation, and accreditation processes are also studied. This course also includes 28 hours of classroom laboratory experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 540  and NUR 550 .

  
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    NUR 601 Conceptual Models and Theories of Advanced Practice Nursing

    3 Credits

    This course prepares advanced practice nurse students to analyze models and theories from nursing and related fields that support professional nursing practice. The application of models and theories are also explored, with an emphasis on their use in nursing practice, research, and education.

  
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    NUR 606 Health Policy, Legal and Ethical Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing

    3 Credits

    This course explores the major issues in health care, health care delivery, health care policy, and other forces that shape advanced practice nursing. Strategies which influence health policy, as well as health care delivery and outcomes, are also emphasized. Topics of study include the policy and politics of health care, health care systems, economics of health care, socio-cultural factors, technology, health disparities, as well as legal and ethical issues.

  
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    NUR 607 Advanced Pharmacology

    3 Credits

    Advanced practice nurse students are provided with the principles of clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics. Students are expected to build upon prior knowledge and clinical experience to integrate pharmacotherapeutic concepts with pathophysiologic status in patients across the lifespan. Pharmacodynamics and kinetics will be emphasized as well as the effects of psychosocial issues and polypharmacy on drug regimens. Focus is on a comprehensive knowledge of evidence based drug regimens for the purpose of prescribing, monitoring, and educating patients, families, and caregivers about the effects of drug therapy on health and
    well-being. Legal and ethical aspects of medication prescribing, dispensing, selling, and acquiring in the U.S. will be covered. This course meets the requirements for prescriptive authority for the advanced practice nurse.
     

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 611 .

  
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    NUR 611 Advanced Pathophysiology

    3 Credits

    This course prepares advanced practice nurse students to understand the biological basis for
    altered function and disease across the lifespan. The students learn to differentiate between normal variations and pathology. This in depth knowledge will become the foundation for clinical reasoning and clinical decisions related to diagnostic tests and the initiation of therapeutic regimens. Application is made through selected case studies.
     

  
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    NUR 612 Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning

    4 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare the advanced practice nurse student to develop sound theoretical and practice skills for making clinical decisions. Students are expected to have basic health assessment skills. Students will build upon basic skills to complete comprehensive health histories and advanced holistic and age appropriate assessments. The comprehensive history includes physical, psychological, cultural, functional, spiritual, and psychosocial data. In addition to clinical data gathering skills, students develop diagnostic reasoning and clinical problem solving skills including formulating differential diagnosis, ordering and interpreting common diagnostic tests, and documenting findings. This course includes a laboratory component. All participants engage in actual practice with fellow students, standardized patients, and simulations.

    Prerequisite(s): A baccalaureate Health Assessment course or its equivalent.

 

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