Feb 03, 2023  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Physical Science (PHYSC)

  
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    PHYSC 326 Special Topics in Physical Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Science [PHYSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    PHYSC 426 Special Topics in Physical Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Science [PHYSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    PHYSC 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of physical science that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified laboratory assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Physics (PHY)

  
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    PHY 107 Physics I

    3 Credits

    Students learn the fundamental concepts and applications of kinematics, dynamics, statics, rotational motion, momentum, work and energy, and fluids.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C) Concurrent with PHY 117 .

    Science Core Course

  
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    PHY 108 Physics II

    3 Credits

    Students learn the funadmental concepts and applications of oscillatory motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radioactivity, and the quantum nature of matter.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 107 /PHY 117  (both with a minimum grade of C) Concurrent with PHY 118 .

  
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    PHY 117 Physics I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Selected experiments parallel topics covered in PHY 107 .

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with PHY 107 .

    Science Core Course

  
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    PHY 118 Physics II Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Selected experiments parallel topics covered in PHY 108 .

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with PHY 108 .

  
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    PHY 126 Special Topics in Physics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physics [PHY] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    PHY 226 Special Topics in Physics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physics [PHY] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    PHY 326 Special Topics in Physics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physics [PHY] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    PHY 426 Special Topics in Physics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physics [PHY] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    PHY 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Physics that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified laboratory assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Political Science (POLSC)

  
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    POLSC 101 The American Political Process

    3 Credits

    This course examines America’s political environment and the functioning of its political institutions.

    Social Science Core Course

  
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    POLSC 104 Political Themes in Film

    3 Credits

    This course uses film to explore some fundamental political themes and questions.  Film has long been a powerful means to define and advocate public policy issues, to set political agendas, and to influence political socialization. Students will critically evaluate films and readings related to the following themes, among others: the individual and the state; foreign policy and national security; capitalism; prejudice; scandal and distrust; the documentary as witness; and political institutions.

  
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    POLSC 126 Special Topics in Political Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Political Science [POLSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated area of study such as Theories of Policy Making, Business-Government Relations, Civil Liberties, International Law, or Health Care for the Poor. Special Topics courses in Political Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Political Science course at the 200-level or above, POLSC 101 .

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    POLSC 203 Local and State Government

    3 Credits

    The organization and operation of state and local governments are studied in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 .

  
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    POLSC 204 Comparative Politics

    3 Credits

    The structure and function of the world’s major political systems and the environments which house them are examined in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 .

    Service Learning Course

  
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    POLSC 205 International Relations

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the central concepts and developments in the field of international relations. They also study the international system and the role of the nation-state within it, as well as the nature of power, its new roles, and its limitations.

  
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    POLSC 208 Government, Business & the Economy

    3 Credits

    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to identify the political, business, and social forces that caused the Great Recession (2007-09) and the economic crash of 2020 and evaluate the implications of those events on our lives today. Students likewise should be able to explain theoretical approaches to capitalism and apply them to real-world, contemporary market systems. Students will develop their abilities to communicate effectively in both written and oral formats.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 , unless waived by the instructor upon request.

  
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    POLSC 214 Contemporary International Political Issues

    3 Credits

    This course investigates some of the most persistent problems in the world today, such as ethnic rivalry, regional conflicts, and international human rights. A values-laden approach is applied in examining the root causes, proposed solutions, and future prospects of these political problems

  
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    POLSC 217 United States Foreign Relations

    3 Credits

    The foundations of United States foreign policy, the major factors which determine policy, and the decision-making process for policy are studied. The course traces the evolution of American involvement in world affairs with emphasis on post-World War II events.

  
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    POLSC 226 Special Topics in Political Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Political Science [POLSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated area of study such as Theories of Policy Making, Business-Government Relations, Civil Liberties, International Law, or Health Care for the Poor. Special Topics courses in Political Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Political Science course at the 200-level or above, POLSC 101  .

  
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    POLSC 240 American Political Parties

    3 Credits

    An overview is provided of the evolution of the party system, the structure and function of political parties, and their political philosophies.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 .

  
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    POLSC 285 Modern Russia

    3 Credits

    Students examine the history and political system of Russia during the 18th century, the Russian Revolution, the era of the Soviet Union, and the reemergence of the Russian nation after 1989.

  
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    POLSC 301 Political Philosophy

    3 Credits

    This course traces the evolution of ideas concerning the nature of political man, government, law, and the state from the classical era through the 20th century.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    POLSC 310 Contemporary American Political Issues

    3 Credits

    An examination of two or three current national political issues are examined through class discussions and readings in current periodicals.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 .

  
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    POLSC 311 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties

    3 Credits

    Students explore the development and principles of American constitutional law, with an emphasis upon those issues and cases that have had a significant impact on American society.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101 .

  
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    POLSC 324 Developing Nations

    3 Credits

    This study of the contemporary political, economic, and social conditions of Third World nations, their prospects for the future, and various proposals related to the global situation are examined from a Christian perspective.

  
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    POLSC 326 Special Topics in Political Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Political Science [POLSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated area of study such as Theories of Policy Making, Business-Government Relations, Civil Liberties, International Law, or Health Care for the Poor. Special Topics courses in Political Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Political Science course at the 200-level or above, POLSC 101 .

  
  •  

    POLSC 350 Politics and the Environment

    3 Credits

    In this course, students will explore the development of the environmental movement (both domestic and international) from the 20th Century into the 2000s, understand roles of the federal government and interest groups in the environmental policymaking process, probe case studies of environmental politics, and gain a greater appreciation for the Franciscan perspective on the environment.​

  
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    POLSC 380 American Political Thought

    3 Credits

    The individuals and ideas which have helped shape the political philosophy and political evolution of the United States begins with the political concepts which formed the foundation of the Constitution. This course explores those ideas and doctrines, including the development of 20th-century liberalism and conservatism, both of which have molded the political direction of the nation.

    Prerequisite(s): POLSC 101  and PHIL 102 .


  
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    POLSC 426 Special Topics in Political Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Political Science [POLSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of a concentrated area of study such as Theories of Policy Making, Business-Government Relations, Civil Liberties, International Law, or Health Care for the Poor. Special Topics courses in Political Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Political Science course at the 200-level or above, POLSC 101 .

  
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    POLSC 460 Research Seminar

    3 Credits

    This seminar emphasizes the methods, materials, and techniques of research in the social sciences with particular attention to political science, including a research project.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior level in the major.

  
  •  

    POLSC 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of political science that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Psychology (PSYCH)

  
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    PSYCH 101 General Psychology

    3 Credits

    This general introduction to the subject matter and methodology of contemporary psychology emphasizes the potential relevance of basic psychology to human problems. A survey of the theories and principles related to development, motivation, learning, personality, and adjustment are included.

    Social Science Core Course

    Prerequisite to PSYCH 212  and all SW courses except SW 100  
  
  •  

    PSYCH 126 Special Topics in Psychology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Psychology [PSYCH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Psychology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Psychology course at the 200-level or above, PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 201 Scientific Reading and Writing in Psychology

    3 Credits

    This course examines the fundamental subfields of psychology, including psychobiology, perception and consciousness, cognition, and social psychology. Students in this course learn how to approach an academic journal article, how to conduct a literature search, conventions of APA style and scientific writing skills. The culminating assignment is to write a literature review on a psychological topic of their choice.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing by start of class and PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    PSYCH 202 Behavioral Science Statistics

    4 Credits

    Students examine the basic concepts, assumptions, and applications of statistical factors in the analysis and interpretation of quantitative data associated with the behavioral sciences. The course also presents an introduction to the use of SPSS statistical software in the analysis of data.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing and PSYCH 101  and MATH 102   or MATH 250  (both with a minimum grade of C).  Must be a psychology major or have written approval of instructor to register for this course.     

  
  •  

    PSYCH 212 Developmental Psychology

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of developmental processes from conception through the entire life span. As part of their study, students examine how and to what extent an individual’s socio-cultural environment and maturation process influence his/her social/personality, physical, and cognitive/intellectual development.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 215 Interpersonal Dynamics

    3 Credits

    This survey of the principles and theory of small face-to-face groups with applications in the classroom setting focuses on the dynamics of the group process in communication. The topics of problem solving, decision-making, and social pressure are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 224 Psychopathology

    3 Credits

    This study of abnormal behavior in individuals includes theoretical formulations of psychopathology. The classification, etiology, and treatment of the major classes of abnormal behavior including, but not limited to, schizophrenia, depression, ADHD, and anxiety are examined.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 226 Special Topics in Psychology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Psychology [PSYCH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Psychology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Psychology course at the 200-level or above, PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 230 Positive Psychology- Pursuit of Happiness and Resilience

    3 Credits

    Positive Psychology is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.  This course builds on the strengths that foster better communities, by creating an environment that encourages the students to learn through some of the principles of Positive Psychology such as justice, responsibility, civility, work ethic, leadership, teamwork, purpose, and tolerance. This course is an experiential class that combines hands on learning and lecture based on the scientific research founded by this field.

     

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C)

  
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    PSYCH 245 Cognitive Psychology

    3 Credits

    The experimental approach to human cognition and how the mind perceives, encodes, organizes, stores and uses information is presented. At the end of the course, students should be able to: define and correctly use essential terms and concepts of cognitive psychology (e.g. attention, working memory, long term memory, encoding, etc.); trace the path of information as it moves through the cognitive system; and demonstrate the practical application of an understanding of human cognition.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 250 Psychology of Adjustment

    3 Credits

    Students examine the biological, psychological, and sociological factors that contribute to the development and functioning of human adjustment. Current psychological theory is interpreted in the context of adjustment. The foundations of maladjustment are also investigated, as are the methods that are used to assess and alleviate adjustment difficulties.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 255 Foundations of Behavioral Health

    3 Credits

    This course studies Intervention Science and the development psychological and sociological theory.  Historical contribution to theory and practice are reviewed, and a focus is placed on understanding current strength-based practices.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C or better).

  
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    PSYCH 265 Psychobiology

    3 Credits

    The biological basis of behavior includes motivation, emotion, learning, perception, and reproduction, all of which are examined in the context of physiology and evolution.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 /BIO 115  and PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 270 Psychology and Film

    3 Credits

    Psychological concepts as they are portrayed in films are explored in this course. Students watch a selection of films, and critically evaluate the ideas presented through in-depth discussions and weekly writing assignments. Several themes will be highlighted each semester.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C). 

  
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    PSYCH 280 Social Psychology

    3 Credits

    The influence of social processes on behavior and cognition are examined in this course. Topics include attitudes, social cognition, compliance, persuasion, attribution, pro-social behavior, group effects, and communication.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 285 Cross-Cultural Psychology

    3 Credits

    This course will introduce you to the scientific study of cross-cultural psychology which examines various psychological phenomena and processes from cultural perspectives. You will consider what culture is and how culture influences psychological processes. You will learn about the theories and empirical findings on cultural similarities and variations through a variety of readings (e.g., peer-reviewed journal articles, chapters, and magazine articles) as well as videos and films. You will connect and apply knowledge you obtain in this course to your own life experiences. By understanding and reflecting upon cross-cultural differences and diversity in psychological processes, you will broaden your perspective, and view others who may be different from you with compassion and reverence. You will critically analyze and evaluate yourself and your interactions with others through a cross-cultural lens.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C)

    Diversity-certified Course

  
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    PSYCH 290 Motivation

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to study motivation as it refers to psychological “forces” underlying behavior. Biological, psychological and social factors that consciously or unconsciously influence our behavior are examined. Important concepts of major theories are discussed, and research findings which may support or contradict each theory are presented. Topics of study include: homeostasis, drives, needs, and awareness, extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, stress, coping, and health, evolution of universal motive, addiction and addictive behaviors, personality and self in motivation, and “free” will.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C). 

  
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    PSYCH 295 Prejudice and Discrimination

    1 Credit

    This is a course for students to strengthen awareness in issues of racism, bias, stereotyping, and the like.  We will explore psychological explanations for how these constructs develop in individuals, emotions involved in acknowledging them, and their implications.  The goal of this course is to increase students’ awareness on the impact of their biases, and how to be a more empathic and sensitive human being in their interactions with others.
     

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C)

  
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    PSYCH 301 Research Methods I

    3 Credits

    This course is to introduce students to the basic principles of scientific psychology and prepare them to conduct psychological research.  Students are expected to develop critical thinking skills, learn to evaluate various research designs and methodology, understand basic data analysis and statistical issues, and learn how to write a research proposal for psychological investigations.

    Prerequisite(s):  Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  ,  PSYCH 201  and PSYCH 202   (with a minimum grade of C).  Must be a psychology major or have written approval of instructor to register for this course.     

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    PSYCH 303 Research Methods II

    3 Credits

    In this advanced research design and statistical analysis course, students conduct an independent empirical research project which culminates in an APA journal-style paper.

    Prerequisite(s):  Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) PSYCH 101  and PSYCH 301   (with a minimum grade of C).      

  
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    PSYCH 315 Tests and Measurements

    3 Credits

    The evaluation and critique of standardized tests in the areas of intelligence and the structure of abilities, personality, and vocational choice are studied in this course. Clinical applications of these tests are also explored.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101   (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 320 Theories of Personality

    3 Credits

    In this study of the major theoretical perspectives of personality development, students have an opportunity to explore various dimensions of their own personalities through personality inventories.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 224  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 325 Clinical Counseling

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the techniques which are utilized in a clinical setting, including interviewing skills, therapeutic techniques, and communication skills. Ethical issues are also examined and discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 224  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 326 Special Topics in Psychology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Psychology [PSYCH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Psychology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Psychology course at the 300-level or above, Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  .

  
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    PSYCH 335 Psychology of Addiction

    3 Credits

    The development of addiction through biological, psychological, and sociological forces is studied in this course. Historical contributions to theory and practice are reviewed, and a focus is placed upon an understanding and application of current strength-based practices.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101   (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 340 Psychology of Gender

    3 Credits

    Utilizing recent studies to challenge old myths and stereotypes, this course examines the physiological, emotional, social, and cultural aspects of gender on personality.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 212  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Diversity-certified Course

  
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    PSYCH 345 Clincal Skills: Motivational Enhancement Therapy

    3 Credits

    The Motivational Interviewing (MI) course will provde students with a brief overview of this style of interacting with clients and familiarize them with its use in various fields.  This is a counseling style that is popular in the field at the present time and training for clinicians is highly desirable in many settings.  This course may be helpful for students interested in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, education, and the like.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (unless permission from the instructor).

  
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    PSYCH 351 Health Psychology

    3 Credits

    Did you know that in the United States most deaths occur because of the choices people make? Leading causes of mortality stem from substance abuse, overeating, unprotected sex, homicide, and suicide. Many people also neglect to exercise, wear seatbelts, or take medications as recommended. This course will focus on understanding the internal, social, and environmental causes of these unhealthy behaviors. We will also critically examine different means of prevention and treatment at the individual and public levels. Health psychology is a broad and upcoming field important for those interested in public health, medicine, and psychology.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C)

  
  •  

    PSYCH 355 Behavioral Health Intervention

    3 Credits

    This course studies Intervention Analysis and Methodology as well as the development of psychological and sociological theory.  Practical contribution to theory are reviewed, and a focus is placed on understanding current strength-based practices for individual’s in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing by the start of the class and PSYCH 101  (with minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    PSYCH 370 Organizational Psychology- Group and Interpersonal Processes at Workplace

    3 Credits

    This course is to introduce students to psychological processes that take place in work environments. Topics include interpersonal dynamics, organizational communication, group process and team work, leadership, conflict resolution and negotiation, motivation, job attitudes and organizational commitment, stress and well-being, and organizational culture.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 375 Learning

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce the psychology students to basic principles of learning and its real world applications. Several types of learning and the relative effects of nature vs. nurture are explored. Competing theories and various research findings of how both learning is acquired and enhanced are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 385 Evolutionary Psychology

    3 Credits

    Using the tools of evolutionary psychology, this course examines human thinking and behavior. Relevant theories of psychology and evolutionary biology are introduced, followed by specific topics in the field such as survival, mating, sex, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression, warfare, conflict, status, prestige, and dominance.

    Prerequisite(s):  PSYCH 265  (with a minimum grade of C)

  
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    PSYCH 390 Experimental Psychology

    3 Credits

    This laboratory course uses planned experiments to investigate such content areas as learning, cognition, or perception. Concepts are studied through experiential modules that allow students to acquire firsthand experience with data collection and interpretation, while being taught current knowledge in the area.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  and  PSYCH 301  (both with a minimum grade of C). .

  
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    PSYCH 392 Multicultural Psychology

    3 Credtits

    This course is intended to introduce and familiarize students with the concept of multicultural psychology. Generally speaking, this means we will be approaching the entire field of psychology from a perspective that is mindful of the diversity and equity in today’s society. In this course, we will examine systems of privilege, oppression, and institutionalized discrimination that influence and help maintain racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism and their psychological consequences on the individual and society. We will learn about and practice dialogic listening.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 280  (with a minimum grade of C)

    Diversity-certified Course

  
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    PSYCH 401 Critical Thinking in Psychology - Honors Seminar

    3 Credits

    This seminar aims at developing and nurturing students’ critical thinking expected in graduate school. Students are encouraged to stay open-minded about higher levels and new ways of learning and cultivate intellectual curiosity. We examine classical research as well as recent research in depth in a variety of sub-fields in psychology such as social psychology, cultural psychology, industrial-organizational psychology, clinical psychology, and judgment and decision-making. These sub-fields of psychology are relevant to other social sciences such as sociology, anthropology, business, and economics. Through selected topics in these sub-fields of psychology, we aim to critically evaluate psychological research for its theories, scientific methods, statistical analysis, findings, and for its application to the real world. We also consider the future direction of psychological science.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 201 , PSYCH 202 , and PSYCH 301 . (all with a minimum grade of C) or equivalent courses in non-psychology majors, or with permission of the instructor.

     

  
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    PSYCH 403 Independent Research I

    3 Credits

    By working on a faculty research project in the psychology laboratory, students learn to interact with research participants, collect data, perform data analyses, and learn more about their particular research topic through readings and extended discussions with the supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  and PSYCH 301  (both with a minimum grade of C).

    Registration in this course is by permission of the faculty member only.
  
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    PSYCH 404 Independent Research II

    3 Credits

    By working on a faculty research project in the psychology laboratory, students learn to interact with research participants, collect data, perform data analyses, and learn more about their particular research topic through readings and extended discussions with the supervising faculty member.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101 and PSYCH 301 (both with a minimum grade of C).

    Registration in this course is by permission of the faculty member only.

  
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    PSYCH 405 Independent Research III

    3 Credits

    By working on a faculty research project in the psychology laboratory, students learn to interact with research participants, collect data, perform data analyses, and learn more about their particular research topic through readings and extended discussions with the supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101 and PSYCH 301 (both with a minimum grade of C).

    Registration in this course is by permission of the faculty member only.

  
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    PSYCH 412 Developmental Psychopathology

    3 Credits

    The behavior of exceptional children is studied, including the areas of congenital and organic deviance and individual patterns of maturation. An analysis of intellectual, emotional, social, and personality adjustments as they affect educational growth is also included.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 212  & PSYCH 224  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 426 Special Topics in Psychology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Psychology [PSYCH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Psychology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Psychology course at the 300-level or above, Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  (with a minimum grade of C).


  
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    PSYCH 430 History and Systems of Psychology

    3 Credits

    The origins and development of the field of psychology are surveyed in this course. Students also examine various schools and theoretical systems, including Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, and Gestalt.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor) and PSYCH 101  (with minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 455 Trauma and Crisis Intervention

    3 Credits

    This course studies trauma and related interventions to those traumas.  Natural and Manufactured Disasters will be explored.  Theory driven practice and development of strategies will be examined.  Science and the development of psychological theory of trauma and the intervening treatments to those trauma’s will be reviewed.  Survival scenario and practical role play for emergency management as it relates to mental health professionals.  Role play using CONOP 8888 and CDC’s academic simulation.  FEMA online course work will contribute to the knowledge base of the simulation as it relates to terminology and structure.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing by the start of class and PSYCH 101  and PSYCH 224  (both with minimum grade of C).

  
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    PSYCH 460 Senior Seminar

    3 Credits

    This course is a capstoned seminar in psychology.  Students are expected to integrate, synthesize, and apply their knowledge and skills that they have acquired in psychology courses for an in-depth analysis of selected topics in psychology.  They are also expected to critically evaluate scientific information and research findings, design and conduct psychological research, and write an empirical research paper.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 301  (with a minimum grade of C) and senior status in the major.

  
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    PSYCH 465 Professional Development

    3 Credits

    This course is intended to assist students with career planning, including both employment and graduate school strategies.  It will enable the student to utilize a self-assessment, job search, cover letter, resume and mock interview to initiate a career planning process, to prepare a portfolio for both employment and graduate school purposes, and to engage in tasks required for admission to graduate school, including writing personal statements, acquiring letters of recommendations, and taking the GREs or other relevant preparatory exams.  Students are encouraged to take this course during their junior year.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

  
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    PSYCH 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of psychology that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (or permission of the instructor), PSYCH 101  and PSYCH 202  (both with a minimum grade of C) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Russian (RUS)

  
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    RUS 101 Elementary Russian I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the Russian language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of Russian grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. Russian culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the Russian language.

  
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    RUS 102 Elementary Russian II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on Russian historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Russian- speaking world.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Modern Language Core Course

  
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    RUS 126 Special Topics in Russian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Russian [RUS] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Russian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    RUS 201 Intermediate Russian I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Russian. Students review their knowledge of Russian grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in Russian.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    RUS 202 Intermediate Russian II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition, as well as through speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    RUS 226 Special Topics in Russian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Russian [RUS] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Russian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 201  for any Russian Special Topics course at the 200- level or above. Science (SCI)

  
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    RUS 326 Special Topics in Russian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Russian [RUS] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Russian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 201  for any Russian Special Topics course at the 200- level or above. Science (SCI)

  
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    RUS 426 Special Topics in Russian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Russian [RUS] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Russian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 201  for any Russian Special Topics course at the 200- level or above. Science (SCI)

  
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    RUS 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Russian that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay that demonstrates extensive learning and competence in Russian. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): RUS 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Science (SCI)

  
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    SCI 126 Special Topics in Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Science [SCI] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    SCI 215 Nutrition

    3 Credits

    As a study of essential nutrients, including physiological functions and food sources, this course includes an overview of nutritional needs during the life cycle and a discussion of some contemporary nutrition topics.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101 /CHEM 111  or CHEM 107 /CHEM 117 .

    A Challenge Examination is available for this course.
  
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    SCI 226 Special Topics in Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Science [SCI] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
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    SCI 326 Special Topics in Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Science [SCI] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    SCI 426 Special Topics in Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Science [SCI] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
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    SCI 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of science that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified laboratory assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Social Work (SW)

  
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    SW 100 Introduction to Social Work

    3 credits

    Introduction to Social Work is the first course offered in the Social Work undergraduate curriculum. This course provides the necessary foundation for understanding the current social welfare system and the ways that social service delivery systems have developed historically in the United States. Introducing students to the many facets of social work, this course examines the profession of social work; its values; specialties of practice; and the various roles of a social worker in a changing society. Emphasis is on the history of social work; social welfare; the skill base of the profession; the organization and functions of public and private social agencies; and the social service delivery system.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite to all other Social Work courses. Registration open to all students who have a maximum of 89 credits earned. Social Work 100 may be taken with other social work courses concurrently. Students who have earned 90 credits or more may only register for this course with permission from the Social Work program director.

  
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    SW 201 Human Behavior in the Social Environment

    3 Credits

    This course includes major contributions of theories from the biological, behavioral, and social sciences relevant to understanding human functioning across the lifespan including infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, older adulthood, and death and dying. Students will have the opportunity to explore a select set of social work and psychological theory that help us understand how individuals and families develop and interact.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 210 Diversity, Oppression, and Social Justice

    3 credits

    This course provides an introduction to the practice of culturally grounded social work while examining diversity issues related to practice, policy, and research in the field of social work.  The influence of social factors, including race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and status are critically examined in relation to the client and the social worker. Concepts and theory related to oppression and privilege are addressed as well as historically-based oppression for specific groups and communities with the goal of social change.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

    Diversity-certified Course

  
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    SW 226 Social Work Required Elective

    3 Credits

    Each academic year, one Social Work Required Elective course will be offered and will highlight a special topic related to Social Work.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100   or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 300 Social Work with Groups

    3 credits

    Social Work with Groups provides introductory knowledge and skills needed for social work practice with groups. The course provides a comprehensive look at how social work professionals interact with groups and provides a history of the kinds of groups found in the social work context.  Emphasis is on the particular skills necessary to work with groups

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 305 Social Work with Communities and Organizations

    3 credits

    Problems exist in communities that impact whole groups of people, requiring the efforts of individuals, as well as organizations, within and beyond the community for conflict resolution.  In this course, students explore the frameworks for thinking about and initiating change; the skills necessary to work in and with organizations, and communities; and larger issues such as empowerment, resiliency, ethical decision making; and the diverse nature of the social work context. The course provides a generalist perspective for students, helping them understand the interlinked nature of micro (individual), mezzo (group), and macro (organizations/communities) skills.  Skills needed for effective community engagement; improved communication; advocacy; grant writing and fundraising; and the use of technology in the field are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

    Service Learning Course

 

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