Feb 03, 2023  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Athletic Training (ATR)

  
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    ATR 388 Level III Practicum 1

    1 Credit

    A clinical course whereby students participate in hands-on learning experiences at various athletic training facilities. The student is required to complete a minimum of 75 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as the daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience, the student makes time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in selected skills that are identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the ATR 250 /ATR 255 , Prevention/Assessment of the Lower Extremity/Lab, and ATR 330 /ATR 335 , Therapeutic Modalities/Lab. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students will utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 250 /ATR 255 , ATR 289 , and ATR 330 /ATR 335 .

  
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    ATR 389 Level III Practicum 2

    1 Credit

    In this clinical course, students participate in hands on learning experiences at various athletic training facilities. The student is required to complete a minimum of 75 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience, the student makes time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in selected skills, identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the ATR 341 , Therapeutic Exercise I, ATR 360 /ATR 365 , Prevention and Assessment of the Head, Thorax and Spine/Lab, andATR 450 /ATR 455 , Physiology of Sports and Exercise/Lab. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.
     

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 341 , ATR 360 /ATR 365 , ATR 388 , and ATR 450 /ATR 455  (with a minimum grade of “C).

  
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    ATR 426 Special Topics in Athletic Training

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Athletic Training [ATR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Athletic Training that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students who have previously taken and successfully completed ATR 100 , Introduction to Athletic Training. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to ATR 100 , are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    ATR 440 Athletic Training Biomechanics

    3 Credits

    Students examine the physical characteristics of bone, muscle, and joints in this course. They are also taught the normal and abnormal movement of the human body in relation to forces acting upon it to produce a variety of postures and gaits. Through this study, they become knowledgeable in the areas of musculoskeletal anatomy, specifically as those areas relate to gait, throwing, and sport forms. An application of physics to movement (specifically, the use of Newton’s Laws to describe and analyze movement) permeates all course content. In addition, students are also introduced to the latest innovations in motion analysis equipment.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240 , BIO 130 /BIO 135  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  and BIO 206  /BIO 216  (with a minimum grade of “C). Concurrent with:ATR 445 .

  
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    ATR 445 Athletic Training Biomechanics Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 440 , Athletic Training Biomechanics, examines the physical characteristics of bone, muscle, and joints as well as the normal and abnormal movement of the human body in relation to forces acting upon it. Through this study, the student gains an in-depth knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. Application of physics to movement constitute the underlying tone for the entire course. The use of Newton’s Laws as a means to describe and analyze movement is also studied. In addition, students learn about the latest innovations in motion analysis equipment.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240 , BIO 130  /BIO 135  and BIO 131  /BIO 136  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  and BIO 206  /BIO 216  .
    Concurrent with ATR 440 .

  
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    ATR 450 Physiology of Sport and Exercise

    3 Credits

    The cardiopulmonary response to exercise in normal and compromised adults as well as the effect of selected medications on exercise tolerance is examined. By emphasizing physiologic principles, as well as how the body reacts to activity and training, students gain a working knowledge of human activity. The goal of the class is to provide students with an up-to-date understanding of the human body and how systems react to training and nutrition. The course’s lab activities allow students to receive practical experiences in conjunction with lecture topics. Areas of study include, but are not limited to, energy transfer, energy expenditure at rest and during activity, nutrition basics, pulmonary function, cardiovascular dynamics, neuromuscular systems, endocrine influences on exercise, training principles, adaptations to training, pharmacologic agents, thermoregulation, body condition, and weight control.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240 , BIO 130 /BIO 135  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 205 / BIO 215  and BIO 206  /BIO 216  , CHEM 101 /CHEM 111  (with a minimum grade of “C”). Concurrent with: ATR 455 

  
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    ATR 455 Physiology of Sport and Exercise Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for ATR 450 , Physiology of Sport and Exercise, provides the student with a working knowledge of human activity by emphasizing physiologic principles and how the body reacts to activity and training. As a goal of the course, the student gains an up-to-date knowledge of testing and evaluation techniques of the human body and learns how all of the systems react to training and nutrition. The course’s laboratory activities allow the student to receive practical experience in conjunction with lecture topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 240 , BIO 130 /BIO 135  and BIO 131 /BIO 136  or BIO 205  /BIO 215  and BIO 206  /BIO 216  , CHEM 101 /CHEM 111  (with a minimum grade of “C”).

     



    Concurrent with:ATR 450 .

  
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    ATR 460 Administration of Athletic Training Programs

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on management concerns in athletic training and sports medicine. Students who have attained senior status in the Athletic Training Program examine such topics as financial issues, design of facilities, management of sports medicine teams, medical records, insurance issues, pre-participation physicals, and emergency care planning. This course prepares seniors to seek employment at different types of athletic training facilities.

    Prerequisite(s):   ATR 389  (with a minimum grade of “C) and senior status.

     

     

     

  
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    ATR 475 Professional Preparation

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are prepared for the profession of athletic training following their graduation from the University. Additionally, they are taught to understand and recognize organizations which are associated with the athletic training profession. A strong emphasis on professional preparation to include collegial projects, interview preparation, as well as research critiques and discussion are covered in this course. Additional topics of study include understanding the psychosocial aspects of being a professional, legal issues, licensure, and actual NATA-BOC exam preparation.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 498  (with a minimum grade of “C”) and senior status.

    Service Learning Course

    This course has an additional course fee of $325.
  
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    ATR 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of athletic training that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): (Prerequisites are at the discretion of the Instructor and Division Dean.)

  
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    ATR 498 Internship In Athletic Training I

    3 Credits

    Intensive, supervised work experiences in Athletic Training are provided to senior majors in the Athletic Training program. The student is required to complete a minimum of 225 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as the daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience, the student makes time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in selected skills that are identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the ATR 340 /ATR 345 , Therapeutic Exercise/Lab. The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 320 /ATR 325 ATR 340 /ATR 345  or ATR 342 , ATR 350 ATR 389  (with a minimum grade of “C) and senior status.

     

     

     

     

  
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    ATR 499 Internship In Athletic Training II

    3 Credits

    Intensive, supervised work experiences in Athletic Training are provided to senior majors in the Athletic Training Program. The student is required to complete a minimum of 225 hours of field experience during the semester. Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as the daily completion of an hour’s log and completion of weekly goal sheets. Throughout their practicum experience, the student makes time to practice, demonstrate, and become proficient in all skills that are identified in the NATA Clinical Proficiencies, which have been covered in the Athletic Training curriculum and have not been demonstrated at a proficient level by the student. Students utilize Atrack to chart their progress at their clinical site.

    Prerequisite(s): ATR 460  and ATR 498  (with a minimum grade of “C”) and Senior Status. 

     

     


Biology (BIO)

  
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    BIO 105 Principles of Biology

    3 Credits

    Designed for the non-biology major, Principles of Biology examines the fundamental concepts of biology as well as science and the process of science, in general. The biological content of this course includes cell theory, development, ecology, evolution, and genetics. Specialized topics reflect the professional experience of the instructor and special interests expressed by the students.

    Concurrent with BIO 115 .

    Science Core Course

  
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    BIO 106 Introduction to Microbiology

    3 Credits

    Intended for Nursing and health science majors, this course covers basic cell structure and genetics in addition to the classification, identification, and physiology of pathogenic microorganisms. Throughout the course, the importance of microbes in health and disease is emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101  or CHEM 107  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with BIO 116 .

  
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    BIO 107 General Biology I

    3 Credits

    The first of a two-semester overview of the major principles of biology, General Biology I includes a study of the biochemical and molecular structures of cells, photosynthesis, metabolic pathways, cell division, heredity, gene expression, and early development.

    Concurrent with BIO 117 .

    Science Core Course for Biology majors and Psychology majors pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree option

    Students enrolled in two or more of the following courses (ENG 094 , ENG 100 , or MATH 092 ) may not register for this course.
  
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    BIO 108 General Biology II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of BIO 107 , this overview includes the origin and diversity of life, evolution, and animal physiology.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 /BIO 117   (both with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 118 .

  
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    BIO 112 Medical Terminology

    1 Credit

    This course encompasses several medical aspects of science and is designed for anyone who is interested in becoming acquainted with the most current medical terminology. Course topics include medical terminology in relation to the body system and disease. This course also provides the student with the basic principles of medical word building. No previous knowledge of anatomy or biology is necessary; although, upon completion of this course, the student will have acquired a solid base knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

  
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    BIO 115 Principles of Biology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Practical laboratory experience in biological subjects is provided in this course. Through these experiences, students learn about and use laboratory tools. They also are taught to apply scientific method, conduct data collection, and critically evaluate those data. In addition, students examine both models of living systems as well as living and preserved specimens. Although concomitant with the lecture, BIO 105 , this course provides opportunities to cover materials that are not or cannot be addressed in the lecture.

    Concurrent with BIO 105 .

    Science Core Course

  
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    BIO 116 Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    In the course, students practice culture and staining techniques as well as antimicrobial susceptibility and identification procedures for bacteria.

    Concurrent with BIO 106 .

  
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    BIO 117 General Biology I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Practical laboratory experience in topics covered in BIO 107  includes the study of cell biology structure and function using microscopes to view living and preserved specimens, tests for biochemical components of cells, enzyme activity, photosynthesis, aerobic respiration, heredity, gene expression, and events in early development. Students perform experiments and write a formal laboratory report.

    Concurrent with BIO 107 .

    Science Core Course for Biology majors and Psychology majors pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree option

    Students enrolled in two or more of the following courses (ENG 094 , ENG 100 , or MATH 092 ) may not register for this course.
  
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    BIO 118 General Biology II Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Practical laboratory experience in topics covered in BIO 108  includes evolution, diversity, and classification of living organisms, as well as the structure and function of animals and animal physiology. Comparative anatomy through dissection of an assortment of preserved animals is also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 /BIO 117   (both with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 108 .

  
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    BIO 126 Special Topics in Biology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Biology [BIO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Biology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    BIO 130 Anatomy and Physiology I

    3 Credits

    This is the first course in a two-semester sequence that covers the basic structure and function of the human body using a systems approach. Major topics covered include histology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.

    Concurrent with BIO 135 .

  
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    BIO 131 Anatomy and Physiology II

    3 Credits

    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that covers the basic structure and function of the human body using a systems approach. Major topics covered include Blood, Heart, Blood Vessels, Lymphatic System, Respiratory system, Digestive system, Urinary system, and Reproductive system.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of BIO 130  / BIO 135  with a “C” grade or better. Concurrent with BIO 136  .

  
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    BIO 135 Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This is a first course in a two-semester sequence that covers the basic structure and function of the human body using a systems approach. Laboratory work includes dissection, microscopy, models, experimental demonstration of concepts covered in class and performance of physiological experiments. Dissection of preserved animal specimens is required.

    Concurrent with BIO 130 .

  
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    BIO 136 Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This is a second course in a two-semester sequence that covers the basic structure and function of the human body using a systems approach. Laboratory work includes dissection, microscopy, models, experimental demonstration of concepts covered in class and performance of physiological experiments. Dissection of preserved animal specimens is required. Lab experiences offer students the opportunity to measure parameters covered in BIO 131  and to design and perform physiological experiments.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of BIO 130  / BIO 135  with a “C” grade or better. Concurrent with BIO 131 

  
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    BIO 200 Fundamentals of Pathophysiology

    2 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease. The course focuses on foundational concepts of pathophysiology, such as cell injury, inflammation, fever, healing, and immunity. Also studied are the systemic pathophysiology of blood disorders, heart, kidney, bone, muscle, lung, and the gastrointestinal tract.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  or BIO 206 /BIO 216  (either with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor; Concurrent with BIO 210 .

  
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    BIO 201 Environmental Issues and Science

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to various fundamental chemical and biological principles that pertain to specific environmental issues. The changes affecting the earth’s environment are due primarily to human actions. The goals of this course, therefore, include learning about the problems and consequences of altering the environment and understanding the nature of science and scientific experimentation. Students explore the social, political, and economic issues related to these scientific findings as they address the ideas of eco-justice, environmental health, etc. A service-learning project is also completed that results in action proposals to redress environmental problems that are discovered through scientific investigations.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 /BIO 117 ; Concurrent with BIO 211 .

  
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    BIO 205 Human Anatomy

    3 Credits

    Systemic, histologic, and regional anatomy are studied with the emphasis on the normal functioning of the human body.

    Concurrent with BIO 215 .

    A Challenge Examination is available for this course.
  
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    BIO 206 Human Physiology

    3 Credits

    This systematic study of human functions emphasizes homeostatic relationships and includes such topics as membrane transport, neurological and endocrine control, muscle physiology, immunology, and the interrelationships and normal function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems.

    Prerequisite(s):  BIO 108 /BIO 118  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118   (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) or the equivalent; Concurrent with BIO 216 .

  
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    BIO 210 Fundamentals of Pathophysiology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This course introduces students to Clinical Laboratory Science testing. Laboratory exercises include routine urinalysis, mononucleosis testing, pregnancy testing, preparation of differential blood smears, and the identification of white blood cells, basic ABO and Rh blood grouping, coagulation testing, glucose and cholesterol testing, and methods of obtaining blood.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  or BIO 206 /BIO 216 ; Concurrent with BIO 200 .

  
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    BIO 211 Environmental Issues and Science Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory experience introduces students to the protocols of scientific experimentation and the relationship of those protocols to environmental issues.

    Concurrent with BIO 201 .

  
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    BIO 215 Human Anatomy Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course provides experience in the detailed dissection of the cat and studies of human tissue and skeleton.

    Concurrent with BIO 205 .

    A Challenge Examination is available for this course.
  
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    BIO 216 Human Physiology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Lab experiences offer students the opportunity to measure parameters covered in BIO 206 ,laboratory wok also consists of pre-clinical laboratory required procedures, such as complete blood count, blood typing and compatibility testing.  Students are also encouraged to design and perform a physiological experiment.

    Concurrent with BIO 206 .

  
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    BIO 226 Special Topics in Biology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Biology [BIO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Biology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    BIO 232 Genetics

    3 Credits

    Basic principles of heredity are studied, including Mendelian and modified inheritance patterns, sex determination mechanisms, linkage analysis with genetic mapping, Chi-square analysis of data, modern molecular genetics, and population genetics with regard to evolution of species and conservation. Molecular structure and processes related to the regulation of genetic material are also emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): One university biology course and MATH 102  or MATH 250  (all with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with BIO 242 .

    Service Learning Course

  
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    BIO 233 Ecology

    3 Credits

    The scientific study of the interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms constitute the focus of this course. Other topics include the environmental factors which influence the distribution of organisms, the effect of competition, predation, and behavior on the dynamics of populations, and the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors in complex ecosystems.

    Prerequisite(s): One university biology course (with a minimum grade of C); MATH 102  is recommended; Concurrent with BIO 243 .

  
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    BIO 234 Plant Biology

    3 Credits

    Plant structure, physiology, metabolism, and reproduction are introduced in this course, in addition to plant evolution and diversity. The importance of plants in maintaining a balanced and healthy ecosystem is emphasized; and the course culminates in a survey of regional native plants.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 /BIO 117  or BIO 105 /BIO 115  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with BIO 244 .

  
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    BIO 242 Genetics Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This genetics laboratory provides an experimental approach to studying the basic principles of genetics. Microscopic examination of mitosis and meiosis in plants and animals is performed as well as the recombination of genes in fungi, Chi-square analysis of hybrid plant offspring, computer simulations of fruit fly crosses to investigate sex-linkage, gene linkage, and an introduction to pedigree analysis using DNA gel electrophoresis.

    Prerequisite(s): One university biology course and MATH 102   or MATH 250  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 232 .

  
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    BIO 243 Ecology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course provides students with experience in the formulation of relevant questions as well as the design and execution of experiments in the field.

    Concurrent with BIO 233 .

  
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    BIO 244 Plant Biology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory reinforces material studied in BIO 234 , Plant Biology, with the examination of a variety of representative plant species on the microscopic and macroscopic level. Field trips to local botanical sites provide opportunities for the observation of plants in their native environment.

    Concurrent with BIO 234 .

  
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    BIO 280 Phage Discovery Lecture

    3 Credits

    Students will isolate their own bacteriophages, and in the process gain a mastery of wet lab microbiological techniques. Students will be able to describe bacterial viruses, their ecological importance, life cycle, and the purification process. Bacteriophages are a proven starting point for student genome analysis since they are plentiful, highly diverse, easily isolated directly from nature. This course has been approved as a CORE Honors Science Course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107  /CHEM 117  and BIO 107  /BIO 117  (all with a minimum grade of “C”). Suggested to have both semesters of freshman General Chemistry and General Biology.

    CORE Honors Science Course

  
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    BIO 285 Phage Discovery Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Students will isolate their own bacteriophages, and in the process gain a mastery of wet lab microbiological techniques. Students will be able to describe bacterial viruses, their ecological importance, life cycle, and the purification process. Bacteriophages are a proven starting point for student genome analysis since they are plentiful, highly diverse, easily isolated directly from nature. This course has been approved as a CORE Honors Science Course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107  / CHEM 117  and BIO 107  /BIO 117  (all with a minimum grade of “C”). Suggested to have both semesters of freshman General Chemistry and General Biology.

    CORE Honors Science Course

  
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    BIO 290 Bioinformatics

    3 Credits

    This course is the second part of SEA-PHAGES research, where students will work on several Bacteriophages genomes for analysis and annotation. Students will gain the basic skills for evaluating and determining possible functions of genes. This course has been approved as a CORE Language course for Biology and Biology/CLS majors.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107  /CHEM 117  and BIO 107  /BIO 117  (all with a minimum grade of “C”). Suggested to have both semesters of freshman General Chemistry and General Biology.

    CORE Language course for Biology and Biology/CLS Majors

  
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    BIO 305 Parasitology/Mycology

    2 Credits

    This study of parasites and fungi which are responsible for disease in humans emphasizes morphology, life cycles, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 315 .

  
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    BIO 315 Parasitology/Mycology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course includes procedures for the recovery and identification of parasites and fungi from specimens.

    Concurrent with BIO 305 .

  
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    BIO 323 Immunology

    2 Credits

    This study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunity emphasizes immune responses and reactions, antibody formation and structure, as well as types of hypersensitivity and complement.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) . Organic chemistry is highly recommended.

  
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    BIO 324 Immunology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This course runs concurrently with BIO 323 , Immunology, and is designed to introduce students to immunological principles by direct use of both modern and classical laboratory techniques. Selected laboratory investigations include serologic testing, serial dilutions, agglutination reactions, precipitation tests, radial immunodiffusion tests, immunoglobulin quantification, flow cytometry, and ELISA techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118   (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II); Organic chemistry is highly recommended. Concurrent with BIO 323 .

  
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    BIO 325 General Microbiology

    3 Credits

    General Microbiology examines the principles and techniques of microbiology and surveys the morphological, biochemical, ecological, and genetic bases of the microbial world, including the role of bacteria in disease and the body’s response to the invading microbes.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118  ,  CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  and CHEM 211  /CHEM 221  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 335 .

  
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    BIO 326 Special Topics in Biology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Biology [BIO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Biology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    BIO 330 Cellular and Molecular Biology

    3 Credits

    The basics of cell structure and function, with an emphasis on molecular genetic processes, are studied in this course. The principles of molecular methods such as recombinant DNA techniques, the polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid hybridization are also covered. The course concludes with an introduction to the molecular basis of cancer.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 232 /BIO 242  and CHEM 212 /CHEM 222  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 340 .

  
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    BIO 335 General Microbiology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Laboratory sessions provide the study and utilization of techniques used to stain, grow, control the growth of, and identify bacteria. Emphasis is given to medically significant organisms.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 /BIO 118 , CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  andCHEM 211 /CHEM 221  (all with a minimum grade of C) Concurrent with BIO 325 .

  
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    BIO 340 Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory introduces basic molecular methods: transformation, DNA purification, recombinant DNA techniques and DNA electrophoresis.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 232 /BIO 242   and CHEM 212 /CHEM 222  (all with a minimum grade of C). Concurrent with BIO 330 .

  
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    BIO 355 Molecular Diagnostics

    2 Credits

    This course presents an overview of current clinical tests performed using molecular-based methods for detection of the nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Students are provided with a foundation for understanding a variety of test methods in amplification and detection of target DNA in areas of laboratory medicine, including genetic diseases, hematology, oncology, infectious disease, histocompatibility, and identity testing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 330 /BIO 340  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II). Biochemistry is highly recommended; Concurrent with BIO 365 .

  
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    BIO 365 Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory

    1 Credit

    In this laboratory course, students are taught to examine and analyze the performance of various techniques that are utilized for the extraction, handling, amplification, detection, and storage of DNA and RNA. Basic laboratory procedures of quality control, proper documentation, and reporting of results from molecular diagnostic tests are also emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 330 /BIO 340  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II). Biochemistry is highly recommended. Concurrent with BIO 355 .

  
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    BIO 370 Hemostasis, Urinalysis, and Body Fluid Analysis Lecture

    2 Credits

    In the first part of this course, topics include the role of blood vessels, platelets and coagulation factors in normal hemostasis, the morphology and function of platelets, diseases of platelets and tests for platelet function, the study of coagulation pathways and fibrinolytic mechanisms, the study of normal and pathologic coagulation inhibitors, inherited and acquired coagulation disorders, and laboratory diagnosis and management of hemorrhagic diseases, hypercoagulability and anticoagulant therapy.  The second part of this course is an introduction to the study of urine and body fluid analysis.  Topics includes the anatomy and physiology of the kidney, physical, chemical and microscopic examination of urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and other body fluids as well as quality control, quality assurance and safety.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206   and BIO 216  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 375  

  
  •  

    BIO 375 Hemostasis, Urinalysis and Body Fluid Analysis Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Laboratory sessions provide study and practice techniques used in routine urinalysis, body fluid examination and microscopy.  In addition, hemostasis practice will include platelet counts and function assays, coagulation assays both routine and advanced.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206  and BIO 216   (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 370  

  
  •  

    BIO 395 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course.

    Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

    Prerequisite(s): General Biology Track

  
  •  

    BIO 420 Hematology

    3 Credits

    This course introduces basic hematological principles. Emphasis is placed upon cellular classification and physiology as well as instrumentation, the coagulation mechanism, and the study of blood disorders such as leukemia, anemia, lymphoma, and hemostasis abnormalities. The course includes case study presentations correlating the relationship of hematological procedures with the diagnosis of blood diseases.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206 /BIO 216 , CHEM 211  /CHEM 221   and CHEM 212  /CHEM 222  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 425 .

  
  •  

    BIO 425 Hematology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course introduces the student to those procedures which are performed in the clinical laboratory. The laboratory includes such analytical methods as complete blood count, platelet count, sedimentation rate, sickle cell studies, hemoglobin electrophoresis, erythrocyte morphology, coagulation procedures, semi-automated blood counters, and coagulation instruments.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206 /BIO 216  CHEM 211  /CHEM 221  and CHEM 212  /CHEM 222  with a minimum grade of C; Concurrent with BIO 420 .

  
  •  

    BIO 426 Special Topics in Biology

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Biology [BIO] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Biology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    BIO 430 Clinical Microbiology

    3 Credits

    Current methods for isolating, identifying, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens from clinical microbiology specimens are studied in this course. A variety of methods are covered, including biochemical, molecular, and immunological procedures. Pathogenic microorganisms recovered from clinical specimens are reviewed by body system.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 325 /BIO 335  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 435 .

  
  •  

    BIO 435 Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    In this course, emphasis is placed upon biochemical testing, selective culturing techniques, special stains, methods of assaying antibiotic sensitivity or resistance, and case studies involving unknown microorganisms for identification.

    Concurrent with BIO 430 .

  
  •  

    BIO 440 Immunohematology

    3 Credits

    This course provides students with a study of blood types, their heredity and importance, donor criteria, blood component therapy, compatibility problems, antibody identification, hemolytic disease of the newborn, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia as well as a review of the mechanics of infection, immunity, and resistance to disease.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 323  (with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 445 .

  
  •  

    BIO 445 Immunohematology Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Emphasis is placed upon ABO and Rh typing; genotyping; donor selection; antibody identification; compatibility problems; preparation of immune globulins; heat and acid elution techniques; preparation of fetaldex; investigation of transfusion reactions; and case studies.

    Concurrent with BIO 440 .

  
  •  

    BIO 446 Management, Education, and Laboratory Information Systems

    1 Credit

    This integrative seminar examines issues which are related to laboratory management, administration, budgetary controls, personnel evaluation, long-range planning, communication, medical ethics, and problem solving. Education methodology, including establishing goals and objectives and methods of testing and/or measurement of outcomes, is also taught. Laboratory information systems are studied to include topics on operational characteristics and the workflow of a laboratory information system (LIS), data information interchange between computers, and the technology associated with LIS.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 330 /BIO 335 , BIO 355 /BIO 365 , BIO 420 /BIO 425 , BIO 440 /BIO 445 , BIO 450 /BIO 455 

  
  •  

    BIO 450 Clinical Biochemistry

    3 Credits

    This course encompasses the theoretical principles and evaluation of laboratory statistics, chemistry instrumentation, enzyme kinetics, acid base, electrolyte balance, renal function, liver, carbohydrate, protein metabolism, pancreatic functions, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac disease, hypertension, muscle and bone disease, lipid metabolism disorders, toxicology, and endocrinology.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 312 /CHEM 322  (all with a minimum grade of C  for Track I and a C+ for Track II) Concurrent with BIO 455 .

    BIO 206 /BIO 216  is highly recommended.
  
  •  

    BIO 455 Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory

    1 Credit

    The quantitative and qualitative procedures used in this clinical laboratory emphasize the principles of analysis, recognition of normal ranges, handling of patient data, quality control management, principles of spectrophotometry, fluorometry, potentiometry, discrete analysis, electrophoresis, and chromatography.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 312 /CHEM 322  (all with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with BIO 450 .

  
  •  

    BIO 458 Senior Capstone I

    2 Credits

    This upper-level course is designed to emphasize the process of scientific application. Students write an in-depth review of primary literature on a topic of their choosing and present this work to a group of their peers.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the major/Senior status and successful completion of BIO 330  /BIO 340  and CHEM 312  /CHEM 322  (For Track 1 with a grade of C or better or Track II with a grade of a C+ or better) or this course may be taken concurrent with both BIO330/BIO340 and CHEM312/CHEM322

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    BIO 459 Senior Capstone II

    2 Credits

    Students will develop a research proposal, design, and perform an experiment that ultimately is presented to peers in a poster format.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the major/Senior status and successful completion of BIO 458  (with a C or better for Track I and a C+ or better for Track II),BIO 330  /BIO 340  and CHEM 312  /CHEM 322  (For Track 1 with a grade of C or better or Track II with a grade of a C+ or better).

  
  •  

    BIO 460 Senior Seminar Capstone

    3 Credits

    This upper-level course is designed to emphasize the process of scientific application. Students write an in-depth review of primary literature on a topic of their choosing. Students also design and perform an experiment that ultimately is presented to peers in a seminar or poster format.

    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Biology major/Senior status and successful completion of BIO 330 /BIO 340  and CHEM 312 /CHEM 322  (all with minimum grade of C).

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    BIO 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of biology that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified laboratory assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
  •  

    BIO 490 Clinical Chemistry Practicum

    2 Credits

    Advanced practical experience and didactic information in a clinical biochemistry laboratory emphasize chemistry instrumentation, immunochemical analysis, electrophoresis, blood Gases, TDM, and toxicology. Departmental permission, acceptance into the BIO/CLS track, and senior standing.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 312  /CHEM 322 , BIO 355  / BIO 365  and BIO 450  /BIO 455  all with a minimum grade of a C+.

  
  •  

    BIO 491 Clinical Immunohematology Practicum

    2 Credits

    Advanced practical experience in a clinical immunohematology laboratory and perfusion service including compatibility testing, blood transfusion procedures and antibody detection and identification. Departmental permission, acceptance into the BIO/CLS track, and senior standing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206  /BIO 216 , BIO 323  /BIO 324  and  BIO 440  /BIO 445  all with a minimum grade of C+.

  
  •  

    BIO 492 Clinical Hematology, Hemostasis and Body Fluids

    2 Credits

    Advanced practical experience in a clinical hematology/hemostasis/ body fluids laboratory includes performance of diagnostic procedures and application of knowledge with emphasis on clinical correlation. Departmental permission, acceptance into the BIO/CLS track, and senior standing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 206  /BIO 216  , BIO 370  / BIO 375  and BIO 420  /BIO 425  all with a minimum grade of C+.

  
  •  

    BIO 493 Clinical Microbiology and Immunology

    2 Credits

    Advanced practical experience and didactic information in a clinical microbiology laboratory utilizing diagnostic techniques in the identification of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. As well as serologic techniques. Departmental permission, acceptance into the BIO/CLS track, and senior standing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 305  / BIO 315  ,BIO 323  / BIO 324  , BIO 325  /BIO 335  and BIO 430  / BIO 435  all with a minimum grade of C+.

  
  •  

    BIO 495 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course.

    Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

    Prerequisite(s): General Biology Track

  
  •  

    BIO 496 Senior Forum

    1 Credit

    Preparing for an oral presentation of a research paper is the focus of this course.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 395  or BIO 495 .

  
  •  

    BIO 498 Medical Laboratory Science Review Seminar

    1 Credit

    This course is designed to prepare the student for the professional role of the medical laboratory scientist. Topics include professionalism and professional ethics, licensure and certification issues, laboratory utilization, critical pathways, principles of interpersonal and interdisciplinary communication and practice. Also, this course will provide a comprehensive review of the major discipline areas within the clinical laboratory. Students are required to attend all scheduled review sessions which will facilitate preparation for the exam portion of the course. Four post rotation exams will be administered. All students will take a final comprehensive exam at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bio/CLS Track of the biology major and successful completion of BIO 420 , BIO 430 , BIO 440 , and BIO 450  with a grade “C+” or greater.


Business (BUS)

  
  •  

    BUS 126 Special Topics in Business

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Business [BUS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Business that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    BUS 201 Business Statistics I

    3 Credits

    This first semester of statistics uses statistical software to handle numbers of variables or large data batches. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random variables, probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    BUS 202 Business Statistics II

    3 Credits

    This second semester of statistics uses statistical software to handle large numbers of variables or large data batches. Topics include hypothesis testing between quantitative variables, chi square tests, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression, and correlation.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102  or MATH 103  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    BUS 220 Black American Business & History

    3 Credits

    Open to all students, this course studies Black/African American history, current events, and culture in new ways with focus on business and societal subjects. Resilience against the odds, rags-to-riches stories, and proven outside-the-box problem solving of successful Black American business leaders are examined. Discrimination, racism, bias, and social justice concerns that affect society regarding diversity, laws, and ethics are discussed. Students discover how to get results through advocacy, promote positive relations in a diverse world, and personal and professional values on the individual, organizational, commercial, and societal levels.

    Diversity-certified Course

  
  •  

    BUS 226 Special Topics in Business

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Business [BUS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Business that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    BUS 250 Business Communications

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the written and oral communication skills that are necessary in today’s diverse business environment. Students plan, compose, and revise a variety of documents with an emphasis on style, organization, and audience analysis. The role of technology is also explored, as is the importance of face-to-face nonverbal communication. Through the semester, students prepare and deliver individual and team presentations and learn effective multi-media presentation skills. A major component of this course includes job search correspondence, strategies, and skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    BUS 309 Legal Aspects of Business

    3 Credits

    In this introductory course on law and the legal environment of management, students review the legal system as well as the rights and obligations of individuals. The concepts of common law, tort law, and statutory law are examined. Students learn administrative regulations as they apply them to business practice in areas such as personnel management, marketing, advertising, competitive strategies, and pricing. The legal responsibilities of the firm in regard to the environment and consumer protection are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    BUS 321 International Business

    3 Credits

    In this foundation course, students are introduced to all aspects of international business and trade. After completing this course, students can compute a country’s balance of payment that includes current and capital accounts and analyze the results. In addition, they can compute cross currency rate to identify arbitrage opportunities, understand the functioning of major international trade institutions and players, and analyze international business culture and ethical dilemmas in cases.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    BUS 326 Special Topics in Business

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Business [BUS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Business that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    BUS 394 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the and paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

  
  •  

    BUS 401 Overseas Experience

    3 Credits

    Students experience another culture through participation in a study abroad, service-learning, or Cooperative Education/Internship program. A summer semester abroad program is also offered in conjunction with other colleges, universities, and/or international companies.

  
  •  

    BUS 426 Special Topics in Business

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Business [BUS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Business that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    BUS 460 International Business Seminar

    3 Credits

    This capstone course in the International Business Program examines the management and operations of an international business by integrating the student’s knowledge of accounting, finance, economics, management, and marketing. A student research project and case studies are required in the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior-level status in the International Business major. This course should be taken during the student’s final semester prior to graduation.

    Service Learning Course

  
  •  

    BUS 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of business that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
  •  

    BUS 494 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the and paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.


Chemistry (CHEM)

  
  •  

    CHEM 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry

    3 Credits

    This survey presents an overview of the fundamentals of general, organic, and biological chemistry. Students are provided with a foundation for understanding the structure, function, and behavior of matter. Mass and energy relationships in chemistry are also examined. Throughout the semester, students are taught to apply chemical principles to the behavior of compounds and to those compounds that are involved in selected life processes.

    Concurrent with CHEM 111 .

    Science Core Course

  
  •  

    CHEM 102 Chemical Investigations

    3 Credits

    Designed for the non-science major who has an interest in forensic science, this one-semester general chemistry course presents fundamental concepts of chemistry with an emphasis on criminal investigation and data analysis.

    Concurrent with CHEM 112 .

    Science Core Course

  
  •  

    CHEM 107 General Chemistry I

    3 Credits

    Designed for the Biology major, this course is the first of a two-semester sequence which examines the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry, including atomic structure and theory, stoichiometry, reaction types, thermochemistry, molecular structure, as well as the behavior of matter and solutions. Students are required to correctly use and apply mathematical relationships to solve quantitative problems which are related to the concepts studied in class.

    Concurrent with CHEM 117 .

    Science Core Course

    Students enrolled in MATH 092  may not register for this course. MATH 103  and/or MATH 110  is highly recommended.
  
  •  

    CHEM 108 General Chemistry II

    3 Credits

    This course is a continuation of CHEM 107 . Areas of study include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid, base, and buffer properties and relationships, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students are required to correctly use and apply mathematical relationships to solve quantitative problems which are related to the concepts studied in class.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107 /CHEM 117  (both with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 118 .

  
  •  

    CHEM 111 Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Basic techniques that are used in a chemistry laboratory are studied and applied. Selected laboratory investigations also extend and support the fundamental concepts that are discussed in CHEM 101 .

    Concurrent with CHEM 101 .

    Science Core Course

  
  •  

    CHEM 112 Chemical Investigations Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course provides students with the opportunity to apply basic chemical techniques that are discussed in CHEM 102 , Chemical Investigations. Several of the laboratory exercises include the chemical identification of unknown samples.

    Concurrent with CHEM 102 .

    Science Core Course

 

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