Sep 28, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Chemistry (CHEM)

  
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    CHEM 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course begins the exploration and application of laboratory techniques through which some of the physical and chemical properties of matter are studied. Experiments parallel the concepts discussed in CHEM 107 . Students are required to correctly use and apply mathematical relationships to solve quantitative problems which are related to the concepts studied in class.

    Concurrent with CHEM 107 .

    Science Core Course

    Students enrolled in MATH 092  may not register for this course.
  
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    CHEM 118 General Chemistry II Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This course continues and extends the laboratory techniques introduced in  CHEM 117 . Experiments parallel the concepts discussed in CHEM 108 . Students are required to correctly use and apply mathematical relationships to solve quantitative problems which are related to the concepts studied in class.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 117  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 108 .

  
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    CHEM 126 Special Topics in Chemistry

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chemistry [CHEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chemistry that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I

    3 Credits

    The fundamental principles of organic chemistry are studied. Topics include bonding, hybridization, acid-base relationships, and stereochemistry as well as the substitution, elimination, and free-radical reactions applied to hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107 /CHEM 117  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  (all with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 221 .

  
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    CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II

    3 Credits

    Organic Chemistry II is a continuation of CHEM 211  with an application of the basic principles of organic chemistry to aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives and amines. Spectroscopy is also introduced as a tool for structure determination.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 222 .

  
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    CHEM 221 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Laboratory methods and techniques used in the purification and preparation of organic compounds are studied. Gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography are also included.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 107 /CHEM 117  and CHEM 108 /CHEM 118  (both with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 211 .

  
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    CHEM 222 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory is a continuation of CHEM 221  and includes an introduction of IR spectroscopy.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221  (with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 212 .

  
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    CHEM 226 Special Topics in Chemistry

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chemistry [CHEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chemistry that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CHEM 312 Biochemistry

    3 Credits

    This course studies the structures, properties, reactions, and functions of the biomolecules (amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and the nucleic acids), and the thermodynamic and metabolic relationships among these compounds.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 /CHEM 212  and CHEM 221 /CHEM 222  (all with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 322 .

  
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    CHEM 322 Biochemical Laboratory Techniques

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course introduces and demonstrates laboratory methods that are used for the separation, characterization, and analysis of the biologically important compounds. Laboratory techniques which are employed include pH measurement, buffer preparation, centrifugation, dialysis, spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrophoresis.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 /CHEM 212  and CHEM 221 /CHEM 222  (all with a minimum grade of C); Concurrent with CHEM 312 .

  
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    CHEM 326 Special Topics in Chemistry

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chemistry [CHEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chemistry that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CHEM 426 Special Topics in Chemistry

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chemistry [CHEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chemistry that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CHEM 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of chemistry that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and specified laboratory assignments under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Chinese (CHIN)

  
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    CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the Mandarin Chinese language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of Chinese grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. Chinese culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the Chinese language.

  
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    CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on Chinese historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Chinese- speaking world.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Modern Language Core Course

  
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    CHIN 126 Special Topics in Chinese

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chinese [CHIN] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chinese that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  for any Chinese Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. Students review their knowledge of Chinese grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts, as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition, as well as through speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    CHIN 226 Special Topics in Chinese

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chinese [CHIN] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chinese that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  for any Chinese Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    CHIN 326 Special Topics in Chinese

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chinese [CHIN] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chinese that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  for any Chinese Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    CHIN 426 Special Topics in Chinese

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Chinese [CHIN] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Chinese that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  for any Chinese Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    CHIN 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Chinese that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay that demonstrates extensive learning and competence in Mandarin Chinese. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Communication and Media Arts (CA)

  
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    CA 110 Introduction to Communication

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to the primary areas of study within the field of human communication. Interpersonal, group, public, organizational, and mass media contexts are examined along with the theories and principles of oral, written, nonverbal, and electronic communication.

  
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    CA 126 Special Topics in Communication and Media Arts

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts [CA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CA 155 Radio Operations

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the organization and operation of the contemporary radio station. Students learn the functions of the various jobs in radio, including announcer, board operator, traffic manager, newscaster, etc. Students are also taught the concept of public interest and its relationship to programming. In addition, they become familiar with pertinent FCC rules and regulations, and standard operating procedures that are in effect at most radio stations.

  
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    CA 206 Effective Public Speaking

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the basic principles and methods of public speaking, with the application of theory expressed through classroom presentations, students prepare and deliver speeches of information and persuasion on topics related to their major field of study. They also take part in oral exercises which have been designed to increase their self-confidence and to enhance the clarity and expressiveness of their speech. Students learn and practice the following rhetorical and presentation strategies which are so useful in the professional workplace and in the classroom: successful adaptation to the audience and the environment; development and organization of the coherent outline; selection of appropriate supporting material and arguments; and the preparation and use of effective visual aids. The techniques of active listening and the use of visual aids for supportive audience behavior are also taught.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C) and sophomore standing.

  
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    CA 215 Mass Media

    3 Credits

    Students examine the structure and historical development of print, photographic, and electronic mass communication systems. A survey of the different types of media and a consideration of their effects upon society and the individual are combined with basic techniques of media analysis. Issues addressed include ethics, regulation, the use of media in public relations and advertising, and the relationship between children and the media.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CA 226 Special Topics in Communication and Media Arts

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts [CA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CA 250 Introduction to Web Design

    3 Credits

    The basic concepts of good web page design are presented in this course. Students focus on understanding the criteria for web design, organization and development of content, and the overall presentation of material. They work with basic HTML and FrontPage to create simple pages and learn how to upload and promote pages.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 270  or permission of the instructor.

  
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    CA 265 Basic Television Production

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to studio production techniques and equipment, students acquire a basic grasp of all aspects of studio production including the use of the camera, video switcher, audio board, and graphics generator. Students also produce short video materials with line sources and instantaneous editing.

  
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    CA 270 Introduction to Desktop Publishing

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the world of desktop publishing. They learn the fundamentals of design, layout, and image manipulation (scanning) as they utilize a computer desktop publishing system. Techniques involved include placing and editing text and graphics as well as scanning and manipulating images. Students also produce a variety of publications.

  
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    CA 285 Basic Audio Production

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the history, fundamentals, and methods of audio recording and an examination of their applications to modern electronic media. Students learn to successfully operate the audio hardware commonly used in radio, television, and recording studios.

  
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    CA 301 Introduction to Film

    3 Credits

    In this course, students study film as a major communication and aesthetic art form and explore the work of classical and contemporary filmmakers and film theorists. An examination of film technique, materials, and vocabulary leading to the development of analytical and evaluative skills is also included.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  and English Literature Core (with a minimum grade of C in each).

  
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    CA 315 Writing for the Professions

    3 Credits

    This course challenges students to examine the range of writing skills which employers expect, i.e., clarity, purposefulness for the communication, coherence, and a more than adequate level of competence in the use of standard written English. A variety of purposes for writing are examined and demonstrated in a developed portfolio of the semester’s work, including formal and informal reports, proposals, and a lengthier researched paper.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CA 326 Special Topics in Communication and Media Arts

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts [CA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CA 330 Communications and Environmental Stewardship

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the processes needed to disseminate, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information concerning environmental issues. Resolving and managing conflict over environmental issues are key to the attainment of solutions of environmental problems. Environmental stewards in this class develop the ability to research, speak, write, and negotiate clearly about a number of complex environmental issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102 .

  
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    CA 345 Public Relations

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the contemporary practice of public relations, with primary focus on the daily tasks and communication responsibilities of public relations practitioners. The issues facing the contemporary professional in this field and basic public relations writing skills are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 110  and CA 215  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CA 355 Advertising

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the principles and practices of contemporary advertising, this course explores the role of advertising in the marketplace, the elements of a successful advertisement, advertising production, and media.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 110  and CA 215  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CA 365 Advanced Television Production

    3 Credits

    Students study and apply the techniques of studio and field production and post-production editing in this course. They use, assemble, and insert edits as well as more sophisticated audio and lighting configurations in the production of cablecast-quality material.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 265  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CA 375 Advanced Desktop Publishing

    3 Credits

    In this desktop publishing course, students are taught the intricacies of design, layout, image manipulation, scanning, and file preparation. Techniques include placing and editing text and graphics; scanning and manipulating images and color separation; as well as plate preparation. Students are required to produce a variety of publications and then work with a printing vendor to produce the piece. Requirements of the course also include visiting a commercial print facility to plan and execute the job. Final projects are presented in class.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 270  or permission of the instructor.

  
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    CA 417 Intro. to Communication Research

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of research methods within the area of communication and includes data collection and analysis methodologies. Students are then taught to apply these skills to a variety of projects.  Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques that are used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and market research situations.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 110  and CA 215  (both with a minimum grade of C) and MATH 102 

     

     

     

  
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    CA 426 Special Topics in Communication and Media Arts

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts [CA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Media Arts that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CA 460 Communication and Media Arts Senior Seminar

    3 Credits

    This upper-level seminar experience for Communication and Media Arts majors is designed to synthesize a student’s learning in this field through the in-depth exploration of a key topic, such as gender in communication.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 417  and senior status.

    Service Learning Course

  
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    CA 465 Remote Video Production

    3 Credits

    A thorough application of the systems and configurations of portable videotaping equipment as well as the organizational and administrative techniques of remote production are studied in this course. Course requirements include field work for the production of short video segments and the in-house editing of those segments into cablecast-quality programming.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 365  (with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    CA 470 Community Programming

    3 Credits

    The application of studio techniques and portable videotaping techniques to the regular production of a television series for community cablecast is studied. Course work is composed of scripting, administering, and producing videos in the studio and in the field. Studio post-production activities are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): CA 365  (with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    CA 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of communication and media arts that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Communication and Digital Media (CDM)

  
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    CDM 110 Introduction to Communication

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to the primary areas of study within the field of human communication. Interpersonal, group, public, organizational, and mass media contexts are examined along with the theories and principles of oral, written, nonverbal, and electronic communication.

  
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    CDM 115 Intro to Video Production and Editing

    3 Credits

    This course addresses the theory, history, terminology, and practice of film/video production. Students will be expected to understand: camera operation and capture techniques, audio capture and control, basic directing, lighting, and editing. Students will learn to edit using the Adobe Premiere non-linear editing software.

  
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    CDM 117 Intro to Audio Production

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the history, fundamentals, and methods of audio recording and an examination of their applications to modern electronic media. Students learn to successfully operate the audio hardware commonly used in radio, television, and recording studios. Students will learn basic recording and editing skills using the Adobe Audition platform,and be exposed to other Digital Audio Workstations.

  
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    CDM 126 Special Topics

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media [CDM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CDM 201 Interpersonal Communication

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and theories of interpersonal communication. Students also examine how the Internet and contemporary social media platforms have impacted human interaction and the interpersonal and relational communication processes that govern everyday life.

  
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    CDM 206 Effective Public Speaking

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the basic principles and methods of public speaking, with the application of theory expressed through classroom presentations, students prepare and deliver speeches of information and persuasion on topics related to their major field of study. They also take part in oral exercises which have been designed to increase their self-confidence and to enhance the clarity and expressiveness of their speech. Students learn and practice the following rhetorical and presentation strategies which are so useful in the professional workplace and in the classroom: successful adaptation to the audience and the environment; development and organization of the coherent outline; selection of appropriate supporting material and arguments; and the preparation and use of effective visual aids. The techniques of active listening and the use of visual aids for supportive audience behavior are also taught.

  
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    CDM 216 Mass Media & Society

    3 Credits

    Students examine the structure and historical development of print, photographic, and electronic mass communication systems. A survey of the different types of media and a consideration of their effects upon society and the individual are combined with basic techniques of media analysis. Issues addressed include ethics, regulation, the use of media in public relations and advertising, and the relationship between children and the media.

  
  •  

    CDM 226 Special Topics

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media [CDM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CDM 230 Professional Communication

    3 Credits

    This course challenges students to examine the range of communication skills which employers expect, including clarity, purposefulness, coherence, and a more than adequate level of competence in the use of standard written English. A variety of purposes for communication are examined such as delivering good news and bad news, persuading, informing, and building consensus. A variety of mediums are also explored, including letters, reports, speeches, email, and social media.

  
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    CDM 232 Principles of Strategic Communication

    3 Credits

    This course builds a foundation for exploring the strategic communication industries, including advertising and public relations. It focuses on the principles and process of strategic writing; strategic design and integrated marketing communication; the role of strategic communications in public relations and in advertising; and law and ethics in strategic communications.

  
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    CDM 262 Media Writing

    3 Credits

    In this introduction to journalism, students learn the characteristics of news, the basic structures and types of stories, a brief history of journalism in the United States, an introduction to writing for broadcast, and a primer on media law and ethics. Students also develop skills in note-taking, interviewing, and writing stories according to current journalism practice.

  
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    CDM 263 Sports Journalism

    3 Credits

    TBA

  
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    CDM 265 Basic Television Production

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to studio production techniques and equipment, students acquire a basic grasp of all aspects of studio production including the use of the camera, video switcher, audio board, and graphics generator. Students also produce short video materials with line sources and instantaneous editing.

    Prerequisite(s): CDM 115 , CDM 117  with a minimum grade of a “C”.

  
  •  

    CDM 267 Basic Radio Production

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the organization and operation of the contemporary radio station. Students learn the functions of the various jobs in radio, including announcer, board operator, traffic manager, newscaster, etc. Students are also taught the concept of public interest and its relationship to programming. In addition, they become familiar with pertinent FCC rules and regulations, and standard operating procedures that are in effect at most radio stations. Students will produce content that will air on the university’s FCC licensed radio station, 98.5 WNUW

    Prerequisite(s): CDM 117  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 272 Visual Communication

    3 Credits

    This class will teach students methods of critically analyzing all types of images; from typesets to photography, from motion pictures to comic strips. Discussion of stereotypes and ethics will be central themes in lectures, discussions, exercises and assignments. By honing visual media literacy skills, students will become better critical thinkers and more effective communicators in the professional world. Coursework will include written analyses of images as well as the production of creative visuals in a variety of media.

  
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    CDM 301 Introduction to Film Analysis

    3 Credits

    A study of film as a major communication and aesthetic form. Comprehensive exploration of the work of classical and comtemporary film-makers and film theorists. Examiniation of film technique, materials and vocabulary leading to the development of analytical and evaluative skill.

  
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    CDM 312 Media Workshop: Neumann Sports

    3 Credits

    Coursework will develop student experience in such content areas as: operation of lighting, audio, and video equipment during sports events, including pre- and post-game shows; directing, scheduling, and managing technicians and talent; on-air performance; and pre- and post-production and archiving.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 115 , CDM 117  and CDM 265  or by permission of the instructor.

  
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    CDM 314 Media Workshop- NeuPress

    3 Credits

    Students become part of Neumann Media’s publication - NeuPress (formerly the Joust) which produces and posts news from around the campus and community, including features, reviews, and commentary. Course work includes story generation, approval, drafting, writing and posting. Students work with our content management system (CMS) gaining hands-on experience with categories, tags, metadata, and comments. Publishing and promoting through social media is also included. Throughout the course, students explore various aspects, duties and positions within the field of journalism including ethics, AP style and the integration of his/her work into a larger operation.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of ENG 102 , or permission of instructor.

  
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    CDM 317 Communication Research

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of research methods within the area of communication and includes data collection and analysis methodologies. Students are then taught to apply these skills to a variety of projects.  Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques that are used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and market research situations.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 110  and CDM 216  both courses with a minimum grade of “C” and MATH 102 .

  
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    CDM 326 Special Topics

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media [CDM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Communication and Digital Media that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CDM 345 Public Relations

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the contemporary practice of public relations, with primary focus on the daily tasks and communication responsibilities of public relations practitioners. The issues facing the contemporary professional in this field and basic public relations writing skills are also studied.

  
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    CDM 352 Beyond Breaking News

    3 Credits

    Students learn the characteristics and process of journalistic writing with an emphasis on creating and refining article ideas, conducting research and interviews, and navigating legal and ethical questions. Online writing is also highlighted, particularly as it relates to multimedia journalism and new markets for publication. Story forms include features, profiles, editorials, columns, and reviews. (Formerly JRN 350)

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    CDM 355 Advertising

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the principles and practices of contemporary advertising, this course explores the role of advertising in the marketplace, the elements of a successful advertisement, advertising production, and media.

  
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    CDM 365 Advanced TV Production

    3 Credits

    Students study and apply the techniques of studio and field production and post-production editing in this course. They use, assemble, and insert edits as well as more sophisticated audio and lighting configurations in the production of cablecast-quality material.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 265  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 367 Advanced Radio Production

    3 Credits

    This advanced level course builds on the basic skills learned in Basic Radio Production. Students learn the theory and techniques of sophisticated radio production, including multitrack recording, mixing, radio automation, signal processing, remote and studio engineering, voice tracking, and on-air performances. Students are expected to work independently producing weekly broadcast-quality radio production content suited for air on 98.5 WNUW. In addition, as a group project, students will design, research, and produce a 1 hour “morning show” style program, including guest interviews, live musical performance, news, and music.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 117   and CDM 267 .

  
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    CDM 370 Professional Uses of New Media

    3 Credits

    A survey of the different types of new media and their effects on corporate practices, society, and the individual. Students will discuss and examine contemporary issues that arise because of the ubiquitous and pervasive nature of new media, including ethics, regulation, content management, consumer interaction, reputation and brand management, and governance.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 216  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 371 Ethics of Media and Cyberspace

    3 Credits

    Students explore historical and contemporary ethical issues in traditional and online media. Using case studies, students will confront and discuss such topics as media governance and regulation, gatekeeping, privacy, social responsibility, surveillance, and the digital divide.

  
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    CDM 380 Advanced Video Production and Editing

    3 Credits

    Students will explore the theory and practice of various editing styles to learn how stories are constructed in the editing room. Students will learn advanced shooting and editing techniques, video formats and codecs and their correlation with post-production, and advanced techniques using Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe Speed Grade.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 115  and CDM 117  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 385 Advanced Audio

    3 Credits

    In this course, students will build on their excisting knowledge to expand on the fundamentals and methods of audio recording and an examination of their applications to modern electronic media. Students learn to successfully operate the audio hardware commonly used in recording studios and audio production facilities.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 267  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 395 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

     


     

  
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    CDM 410 Directing for the Screen

    3 Credits

    Fundamentals of screen directing, which includes script breakdown, scene blocking, communication with cast and crew, and the logistics of production.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 380  with a minimum grade of “C”.

  
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    CDM 430 Mobile Communication Technology

    3 Credits

    This course presents an advanced theoretical and critical presentation of interpersonal, strategic, and mass communication theories and concepts. Students will learn to evaluate how mobile communication influences communities, social structures, and global communicative, cultural, and behavioral trends.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 216  with a minimum grade of “C” and Junior or Senior Standing.

  
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    CDM 431 Globalization, New Media and the Internet

    3 Credits

    This course explores the implications of the Internet and various new media platforms in terms of how they facilitate and influence globalization in a variety of contexts, including business, public advocacy, law, sports, mass media, communities, human relationships, education, healthcare, and public discourse. The risks and benefits of new media and the Internet are also identified.

  
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    CDM 450 Media Speaking

    3 Credits

    Today’s media spokesperson must compete with shrinking audience attention spans, cope with social media overload, and confront sensationalized reporting. Given those challenges, how can you create positive messages that cut through the noise and motivate your audiences? How can you respond to difficult questions in a confident manner? Media Speaking provides students the theory, tools, and practice needed to become an effective media spokesperson.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 206  and CDM 230   both with a minimum grade of “C” or permission of instructor.

  
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    CDM 455 Crisis Communication

    3 Credits

    This course presents students with the appropriate theory, best practices, key concepts and strategies, and promotes discernment in the area of crisis communication and effective crisis management. The course will explore crisis communication from a mass communication perspective, analyzing the role and impact of the media during a crisis event. Additionally, students will develop essential skills in the areas of critical thinking, problem solving, executive presence, use of voice, and message meaning as they explore the topics of reputation management, risk management, issues management, relationship management, crisis planning and preparation, and crisis management planning. Case studies will be used as a means to assess these areas and apply course content to historical and contemporary examples of crises.

     

    Prerequisite(s): CDM 345  , or permission of instructor.

  
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    CDM 460 Communication Arts Seminar

    3 Credits

    This upper-level seminar experience for Communication and Media Arts majors is designed to synthesize a student’s learning in this field through the in-depth exploration of a key topic, such as gender in communication.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 317  with a minimum grade of “C”.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    CDM 465 Documentary Production

    3 Credits

    This course will build on the skills acquired basic and advanced video production and editing, as well as basic television, to produce engaging, professional documentaries. Students will learn the history of documentaries, as well as the various approaches to documentary creation. Finally, students will learn effective technical and aesthetic lighting and filming techniques, prepare story boards, research for and write scripts, and learn advanced interviewing skills, and advanced editing skills.

  
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    CDM 470 Strategies of Digital Media Production

    3 Credits

    A thorough application of the systems and configurations of portable videotaping equipment as well as the organizational and administrative techniques of remote production are studied in this course. Course requirements include field work for the production of short video segments and the in-house editing of those segments into cablecast-quality programming.

    Prerequisite(s): Successfully complete CDM 365  with a minimum grade of “C” or permission of the instructor.

  
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    CDM 495 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

     
     

Computer and Information Management (CIM)

  
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    CIM 126 Special Topics in Computer and Information Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management [CIM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIM 201 Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic.net/Java

    3 Credits

    CIM 201 is the first course in computer programming in which students learn how to write simple business application programs using Visual Basic. Topics include keyboard and screen I/O, looping, branching, arrays, and an introduction to Java.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 211 Advanced Computer Programming with C++.net/Java

    3 Credits

    In this course, students learn advanced programming techniques to implement efficient business application software through the use of various data structures. The importance of problem-solving techniques, good programming style, software engineering, and object-oriented programming (using C++) are emphasized. Topics of study include functions; pointers and lists; data structures recursion; file I/O; and advanced Java.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 201  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 220 Foundations of Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Information systems are an integral part of all business activities and careers. This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary information systems and demonstrate how these systems are used throughout global organizations. The focus of this course will be on the key components of information systems - people, software, date, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantages. Through the knowledge of how IS provides a competitive advantage students will gain an understanding of how information is used in organizations and how IT enables improvement in quality, speed, and agility. This course also provides an introduction to systems and development concepts, technology acquisition, and various types of application software that have become prevalent or are emerging in modern organizations and society.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100   and CIM 102  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 226 Special Topics in Computer and Information Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management [CIM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIM 230 Enterprise Architecture

    3 Credits

    This course explores the design, selection, implementation and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructure and their fit with the business. Students learn frameworks and strategies for infrastructure management, system administration, data/information architecture, content management, distributed computing, middleware, legacy system integration, system consolidation, software selection, total cost of ownership calculation, IT investment analysis, and emerging technologies. These topics are addressed both within and beyond the organization, with attention paid to managing risk and security within audit and compliance standards. Students also hone their ability to communicate technology architecture strategies concisely to a general business audience.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).   

  
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    CIM 325 Enterprise Resource Planning – SAP Applications

    3 Credits

    Designed to teach the concepts of enterprise resource planning systems, this course provides students with hands-on experience to learn how different business functions are interrelated. The primary objective of this course is to learn all the facets of business through understanding business processes. A hypothetical company will form the basis for learning these business functions.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 326 Special Topics in Computer and Information Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management [CIM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIM 340 Data and Information Management

    3 Credits

    This course provides the students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organizational information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database using an industrial-strength database management system. The course will also include coverage of basic database administration tasks and key concepts of data quality and data security. In addition to developing database applications, the course helps the students understand how large-scale packaged systems are highly dependent on the use of DBMSs. Building on the transactional database understanding, the course provides an introduction to data and information management technologies that provide decision support capabilities under the broad business intelligence umbrella.

    Prerequisite(s):  CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C.)

  
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    CIM 345 Web Development

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are taught how to plan, create, and publish an e-business web site. They also learn how to customize the appearance of a web site and how to maintain a web site by creating and maintaining hyperlinks, working with pictures, and developing tables. Throughout this course, students acquire the skills which are necessary to develop web pages with frames and forms, to create a discussion group, and to integrate a database with a web site.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 350 Systems Analysis and Design

    3 Credits

    This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how computer-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 340  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Service Learning Course

  
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    CIM 355 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design

    3 Credits

    The concepts and skills that are central to a career as a systems analyst are examined through an applied approach to learning. Students are taught structured systems analysis and design methodologies as well as modeling techniques, and are also introduced to object-oriented concepts. Students are then required to complete a term project that integrates and applies these concepts and techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 350  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 360 IT Infrastructure

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to IT infrastructure issues for students majoring in Information Systems. It covers topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks, with an overall focus on the services and capabilities that IT infrastructure solutions enable in an organizational context. It gives the students the knowledge and skills that they need for communicating effectively with professionals whose special focus is on hardware and systems software technology and for designing organizational processes and software solutions that require in-depth understanding of the IT infrastructure capabilities and limitations. It also prepares the students for organizational roles that require interaction with external vendors of IT infrastructure components and solutions. The course focuses strongly on Internet-based solutions, computer and network security, business continuity, and the role of infrastructure in regulatory compliance.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 365 Advanced Networking

    3 Credits

    Through a study of advanced data communications, networking, and distributed computing technologies, this course provides the student with the skills that are necessary to plan, design, implement, and manage LAN networks. The inter-networking between LANs as well as LANs with WANs is also studied. Other related content areas include network models, data, video and voice communications, as well as local area, wide area, and wireless technologies. The student also learns how to select LAN technology based upon client/server application requirements and how to configure the LAN to interconnect with the various computing resources of an organization.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 360  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CIM 410 IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition

    3 Credits

    This course explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems function in organizations and how the IS function integrates / supports / enables various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a senior management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course addresses issues relating to defining the high-level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative and strategic needs of the organization. The remainder of the course is focused on developing an intellectual framework that will allow leaders of organizations to critically assess existing IS infrastructures and emerging technologies as well as how these enabling technologies might affect organizational strategy. The ideas developed and cultivated in this course are intended to provide an enduring perspective that can help leaders make sense of an increasingly globalized and technology intensive business environment.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).  

 

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