Oct 05, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Computer and Information Management (CIM)

  
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    CIM 411 Information Assurance & Security

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of program design using the C++ programming language. Upon completion of the course the student will understand the basic structure and syntax of the C++ language, know how to design, code, compile, debug, and execute C++ program, understand classes and objects, know how to use constants, variables, streams I/O routines, arrays, and structures within a C++ program, and advanced Java.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 220  (with a minimum grade of C).  

  
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    CIM 412 Systems Security for Senior Management

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on teaching and training students to be able to describe and apply the appropriate actions to manage and administrate the Information Systems in a secure manner, as well as be able to perform the comprehensive multidiscipline assessment of the technical and non-technical security features of an information system. Outlines the principles of administration and management of security of enterprise information systems and networks. Principles and tools related to intrusion detection systems, vulnerability analysis, anomaly detection, computer forensics, application logging, auditing and data management, risk management, contingency planning and incident handling, digital immune systems, and alarms and responses. Security standards, evaluation and certification process; security planning, ethical and legal issues in information; privacy, traceability and cyber-evidence. Topical review and discussion on current trends in CNSS 4012 standard.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 411  (with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor).  

  
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    CIM 426 Special Topics in Computer and Information Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management [CIM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIM 430 IS Project Management

    3 Credits

    This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects. The course covers a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects. This course assumes that project management in the modern organization is a complex team based activity, where various types of technologies (including project management software as well as software to support group collaboration) are an inherent part of the project management process. This course also acknowledges that project management involves both the use of resources from within the firm, as well as contracted from outside the organization.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 350  (with a minimum grade of C).  

  
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    CIM 440 Computer Forensics

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and issues of computer forensics; aspects of computer and cybercrime; methods to uncover, protect, exploit, and document digital evidence; tools, techniques, and procedure to perform computer and cybercrime investigation. This course will introduce the topics of computer crime and computer forensics.

    Prerequisite(s): CIM 360  (with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor).

  
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    CIM 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of computer and information management that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Computer Information Systems (CIS)

  
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    CIS 102 Introduction to Computer Science

    3 Credits

    This foundational course covers the following topics:

    Basic Information Literacy including Data manipulation, data analysis and data visualization techniques using a Spreadsheet tool (currently Microsoft excel).

    Data sharing and productivity tools such as Google Docs and Microsoft Word

    Integrating MS office tools

    Basic online safety such as security while connecting wirelessly in public spaces

    Language Core Course for School of Business and Information Management

  
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    CIS 126 Special Topics: Computer Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems [CIS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIS 201 Introduction to Computer Programming

    3 Credits

    CIS 201 is the first course in computer programming in which students learn how to write simple business application programs using Visual Basic and Java.  Topics include keyboard and screen I/O, looping, branching, arrays, and an introduction to Java.

    Language Core Course for School of Business and Information Management

  
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    CIS 211 Advanced Computer Programming with C++.net/Java

    3 Credits

    In this course, students learn advanced programming techniques to implement efficient business application software through the use of various data structures. The importance of problem-solving techniques, good programming style, software engineering, and object-oriented programming (using C++) are emphasized. Topics of study include functions; pointers and lists; data structures recursion; file I/O; and advanced Java.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 201  

  
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    CIS 220 Management Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Introduces effective and efficient use of information systems (IS) to support the mission of the organization which is critical. Strategic use of IS and the ability to manage information systems enables organizations to reduce or remove distance barriers, reduce time for processing and decision making, and support effective and efficient use of scarce resources. In this course students will learn skills and techniques used to implement and operate marketplace IS tools to support organizational objectives and strategies. This course is a broad survey of IS-related topics and introduces students to business information systems, IS infrastructure and emerging technologies, security, telecommunications, the Internet and the Web, decisions making systems, and ethical and social issues in IS.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  minimum grade of C.

  
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    CIS 226 Special Topics: Computer Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems [CIS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIS 230 Enterprise Architecture

    3 Credits

    This course explores the design, selection, implementation and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications and infrastructure and their fit with the business. Students learn frameworks and strategies for infrastructure management, system administration, data/information architecture, content management, distributed computing, middleware, legacy system integration, system consolidation, software selection, total cost of ownership calculation, IT investment analysis, and emerging technologies. These topics are addressed both within and beyond the organization, with attention paid to managing risk and security within audit and compliance standards. Students also hone their ability to communicate technology architecture strategies concisely to a general business audience.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 220  

  
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    CIS 326 Special Topics: Computer Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems [CIS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIS 340 Data and Information Management

    3 Credits

    This course provides the students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organizational information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database using an industrial-strength database management system. The course will also include coverage of basic database administration tasks and key concepts of data quality and data security. In addition to developing database applications, the course helps the students understand how large-scale packaged systems are highly dependent on the use of DBMSs. Building on the transactional database understanding, the course provides an introduction to data and information management technologies that provide decision support capabilities under the broad business intelligence umbrella.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 220  

  
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    CIS 345 Web Development

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are taught how to plan, create, and publish an e-business web site. They also learn how to customize the appearance of a web site and how to maintain a web site by creating and maintaining hyperlinks, working with pictures, and developing tables. Throughout this course, students acquire the skills which are necessary to develop web pages with frames and forms, to create a discussion group, and to integrate a database with a web site.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 220  

  
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    CIS 350 Systems Analysis

    3 Credits

    This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques, and tools that organizations use to determine how they should conduct their business, focusing on how computer-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way the company is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and determining the requirements for the information systems solution; in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.

  
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    CIS 360 IT Infrastructure

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to IT infrastructure issues for students majoring in Information Systems. It covers topics related to both computer and systems architecture and communication networks, with an overall focus on the services and capabilities that IT infrastructure solutions enable in an organizational context. It gives the students the knowledge and skills that they need for communicating effectively with professionals whose special focus is on hardware and systems software technology and for designing organizational processes and software solutions that require in-depth understanding of the IT infrastructure capabilities and limitations. It also prepares the students for organizational roles that require interaction with external vendors of IT infrastructure components and solutions. The course focuses strongly on Internet-based solutions, computer and network security, business continuity, and the role of infrastructure in regulatory compliance.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 220  

  
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    CIS 410 IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition

    3 Credits

    This course explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems function in organizations and how the IS function integrates / supports / enables various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a senior management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course addresses issues relating to defining the high-level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative and strategic needs of the organization. The remainder of the course is focused on developing an intellectual framework that will allow leaders of organizations to critically assess existing IS infrastructures and emerging technologies as well as how these enabling technologies might affect organizational strategy. The ideas developed and cultivated in this course are intended to provide an enduring perspective that can help leaders make sense of an increasingly globalized and technology intensive business environment.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 220  

  
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    CIS 426 Special Topics: Computer Information Systems

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems [CIS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Computer and Information Systems that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CIS 430 IS Project Management

    3 Credits

    This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects. The course covers a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects. This course assumes that project management in the modern organization is a complex team based activity, where various types of technologies (including project management software as well as software to support group collaboration) are an inherent part of the project management process. This course also acknowledges that project management involves both the use of resources from within the firm, as well as contracted from outside the organization.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 350  

  
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    CIS 440 Computer Forensics

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and issues of computer forensics; aspects of computer and cybercrime; methods to uncover, protect, exploit, and document digital evidence; tools, techniques, and procedure to perform computer and cybercrime investigation. This course will introduce the topics of computer crime and computer forensics.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 360  

  
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    CIS 480 Independent Study Project

    3 Credits

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of computer and information management that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Criminal Justice (CJ)

  
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    CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 Credits

    This survey course introduces students to selected topics within the field of criminal justice, including the scope and goals of the criminal justice system; the definitions and explanations of related criminal justice terms; and the history, development, and philosophy of law enforcement in a democratic society. Students also examine agencies which are involved in the administration of the criminal justice system.

  
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    CJ 126 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice [CJ] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CJ 201 Criminology

    3 Credits

    Students examine the classical and contemporary theories of crime; the nature and causes of crime and criminal behavior; and the relationship between law and crime.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 , POLSC 101 , and PSYCH 101  (all with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    CJ 202 Judicial Process and Procedures

    3 Credits

    This course explains the role of the judiciary, its historical background, and its development in the United States. Due process of law and the judicial procedure through which an arrested offender enters the criminal justice system are stressed. Problems of change and the reform of the criminal justice process are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 204 Interview Techniques

    3 Credits

    The purpose of this special topic course is to give the student an introduction to the skill of interviewing. The course is designed to allow the student to gain specific skill sets in interviewing, and to gain the confidence in asking questions and understanding verbal and non-verbal communication in interactions.

  
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    CJ 205 Writing for Criminal Justice

    3 Credits

    Students will improve their written communication skills across a variety of assignment and report formats that may be useful to the criminal justice practitioner. Particular attention will be paid to the proper use of APA style in academic writing and to ethical reporting practices in law enforcement and corrections.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of  CJ 101  with a “C” grade or better.  

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    CJ 210 Juvenile Justice System

    3 Credits

    The nature, prevalence, and causes of juvenile crime are introduced in this course as are the theories of prevention and interventions in the juvenile justice system. The concepts of restorative justice and the ways in which an understanding of Franciscan philosophy and theology impact the juvenile justice system are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 220 Criminal Investigations

    3 Credits

    In addition to the history, theories, and problems of criminal investigations, this course focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal investigations, such as crime scene searches, as well as the collection, preservation, and recording of physical evidence. Other topics of study include the procedures which are related to the impartial gathering of information, interview and interrogation methods, identification of modus operandi and sources of information, development and handling of informants, the use of scientific aids in conducting investigations, and report writing.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 226 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice [CJ] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CJ 230 Police Organization and Behaviors

    3 Credits

    Police agencies of varying sizes and organizational structures are examined. The levels of cooperation and/or friction between law enforcement personnel and the communities which they serve are also analyzed, as are the political, social, and economic forces which influence these relationships. The impact of a police culture including identity, social roles, and group dynamics on the ethical and moral behavior of police officers is also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 240 Criminalistics

    3 Credits

    This course will familiarize students with the principles of forensic, the study and application of science to legal processes which involves the collection, examination, evaluation, and interpretation of evidence. The course will review the basic applications of the biological, physical, chemical, medical and behavioral sciences and apply these to questions of evidence and law. Students will gain a basic understanding of the capabilities and limitations of the forensic sciences as they are presently practiced.

  
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    CJ 250 Criminal and Civil Law

    3 Credits

    A study of criminal offenses by statutory and common law definition and classification, this course examines the laws of arrest; search and seizure; and the analysis of constitutional and statutory concepts governing the introduction and use of information in formalized legal proceedings.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 260 Criminal Behavior

    3 Credits

    This course examines the psychological components of crime and the application of psychological theory to the explanation and understanding of criminal behavior. Areas of study include personality variables and development processes related to criminal behavior, choice and motives involved in criminal behavior, and criminal profiling.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 101  (with a minimun grade of C)

  
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    CJ 301 White Collar Crime

    3 Credits

    This course analyzes usually nonviolent criminal conduct described as official corruption, systematic crime, or violations of trust, all of which are characterized by calculation, deceit, and personal enrichment. The influence of organized crime on this type of criminal conduct is also explored.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 302 Organized Crime

    3 Credits

    Students explore the nature and problems of organized crime, including its roots and causal factors in American society, as well as its activities, organizations, and economics. The problems of corruption and graft and the development of strategies to control the activities of organized crime are also explored.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 303 Research Methods

    3 Credits

    In this course, students learn the fundamental principles of research, including empiricism, objectivity, and research design. They are then taught how to apply those principles to the Criminal Justice major by designing a research project which collects and analyzes data and presents that data in an APA format.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 .

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    CJ 310 Forensics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to give the student a more complete understanding of the relevant principles and applications which are utilized in forensic science. Specific examination techniques for a wide range of evidence prevalent in the modern crime lab are also examined. The student gains an understanding of the intricate and symbiotic relationship between forensics science and criminal law.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 /BIO 115  and CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 320 The Penitent: Corrections and Rehabilitation

    3 Credits

    This course surveys the growing field of corrections in the United States. Students become familiar with the history of institutionalized incarceration, probation, parole, and counseling of the offender. Specialized programs and training for the juvenile offender are reviewed and analyzed through case studies.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 326 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice [CJ] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CJ 330 Victimology: Consequences of Crime

    3 Credits

    The issues that tend to “twice victimize” crime victims through the way in which they are treated by the criminal justice system that is supposed to help them is addressed in this course. Current policies, trends, theories, and programs are discussed. Specialized responses to victims of violence as well as the etiology and typology of victimization are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 201  and CJ 260  

  
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    CJ 340 Terrorism

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts of terrorism, both domestic and international. The causes and effects of terrorism and its relationship to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the impact of terrorism on the world today.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 370 Systems of Justice: Restorative Justice

    3 Credits

    This course examines contemporary issues, procedures, and problems which are associated with the practicalities of law enforcement, the judiciary, corrections, and rehabilitation. An in-depth examination of current issues in criminal justice research and policies is addressed, as well as the political and ethical obligations and concerns associated with each component of the criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 401 Violent Crime

    3 Credits

    The nature, theory, history, and psychology of violence in America constitute the focus of this course. The etiology of violence and victimology, and the public response to violence are discussed. Students examine a variety of violent crimes, including the various forms of murder (mass, serial, and spree), homicide, rape, assault, and serial crimes.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 201  and CJ 260 .

  
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    CJ 410 Multicultural Issues in Criminal Justice

    3 Credits

    This course examines diversity issues as they impact law enforcement agencies, both internally and externally. Content areas include a study of race, sex, religion, ethnicity, and related subjects. The course is designed to help criminal justice professionals meet the challenges presented when working with minority population concerns, problems, and needs.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

    Diversity-certified Course

  
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    CJ 420 Strategies of Crime Prevention

    3 Credits

    The new strategies of community and problem-oriented policing in America are addressed, with particular attention focused on the various techniques that are employed by police departments. The rationale and implication of these methods of social control are investigated in depth.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 426 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice [CJ] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Criminal Justice that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    CJ 430 Drug Abuse and the Criminal Justice System

    3 Credits

    This course analyzes drug abuse in America and how the criminal justice system deals with this increasingly complex problem. The public policies and programs which have been developed to address substance abuse are examined. The present state of the laws, techniques of law enforcement, sentencing, and alternative systems are reviewed and critiqued.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101 .

  
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    CJ 460 Senior Seminar

    3 Credits

    In this capstone course of the Criminal Justice Program, students discuss and assess current issues facing the criminal justice professional as well as the experiences which have been gained from their work-study internship in CJ 495. Student research projects and case studies are also included in the content of this seminar.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  and senior status.

  
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    CJ 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of criminal justice that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
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    CJ 494 Internship I

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

    Prerequisite(s): Proof of a current Pennsylvania Criminal Background Clearance preceding the semester of registration for CJ 495 and completion of a pre-internship appointment.

  
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    CJ 495 Internship II

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.


Cybersecurity (CBR)

  
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    CBR 201 Introduction to Cybersecurity

    3 Credits

    This course introduces information technologies and examines methods for defending against persistent and continually evolving threats. Existing and emerging information technologies are discussed, including operating environments, computer networking, and data management. Basic methods for managing information systems and technologies are presented from the standpoint of providing security protections.  Students learn practices used in the underworld of cybercrime to identify risk. Students will also analyze business and economic risks associated with cyber systems with a focus on understanding and preventing cyber attacks. This course is suitable for students majoring in Cybersecurity, Information Systems or Business, or anyone interested in understanding how, why, when, and where cybercrime may occur.

  
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    CBR 202 Cybersecurity Essentials

    3 Credits

    This course explores physical security, operating systems, network devices, virtual and mobile platforms. Topics include organizational access control models, profiles, and assigning rights, security models, hardware, and software controls.  Additional topics include access models and securing system access with passwords, smart cards, and biometrics to ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data.  Also, governance and risk assessment, secure controls, data loss prevention, vendor management, and training are discussed in detail. IT policies and procedures, data loss prevention, and user training will also be explored.

  
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    CBR 203 Application Security, Linux and Cryptography

    3 Credits

    In this course, students will gain an understanding of computer code that can be harmful or malicious and how an organization can protect itself from these attacks.  Students will gain experience securing applications, web services, and learn how to integrate robust security measures into the web application development process using proven architectures and best practices. Incorporated throughout the class will be an introduction to Linux, including the command line, basic navigation, permissions, piping, redirection, and scripting. The latter half of the course introduces cryptography as an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. This course explains the inner workings of cryptographic primitives and how to use them correctly.

    Prerequisite(s): CBR 201 , CBR 202  

  
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    CBR 204 Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing

    3 Credits

    This course explores a variety of ethical and legal issues facing today’s computing environments. Existing and future legal infrastructures such as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the Telecommunications Decency Act, the General Data Protection Regulation (EU), and emerging technologies for the management of digital rights will be explored.  In addition, students will learn the impact that criminal activities such as computer fraud and abuse, desktop forgery, embezzlement, child pornography, computer trespass, and computer piracy have on individuals and corporations.  Students are made fully aware of the ethical commitment and moral behavior required by the profession and the penalties for criminal conduct.

  
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    CBR 301 Incident Response and Forensics

    3 Credits

    This course will help students create an organized approach to addressing and managing the aftermath of a security breach or cyberattack. Students will develop an understanding of threat and asset identification, countermeasures and safeguards, acceptable risks, and vulnerabilities. The auditing concepts of technical, physical, and administrative controls will be introduced along with how these controls are measured for effectiveness. One area of emphasis is compliance with laws and regulations in the areas of data collection and forensics. Students will develop the skills required to remediate an incident from the initial response to improving an organization’s longterm security posture.

    Prerequisite(s): CBR 201 , CBR 202  

  
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    CBR 304 Python Programming

    3 Credits

    Python is an essential programming language for cybersecurity professionals.  It is widely used throughout the industry, is extremely powerful and yet, easy to learn. For example, it can be used to perform a variety of security functions, including software analysis, hardware scanning, and access modeling. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of the Python programming language and programming best practices.  The course explores the basics of Python, including how to develop scripts, work with functions, and variables in an interactive mode.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 201  

  
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    CBR 401 Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing

    3 Credits

    This course presents the concepts of ethical (white hat) vulnerability scans, reconnaissance, general hacking techniques, tools of the trade, red team recon, password cracking, and use of the Metasploit framework.  Other important topics discussed include setting up a security lab, the pre-engagement phase, and pen test assessment steps (i.e., information gathering, scanning, finding vulnerabilities, exploit development and attacks, and post-exploitation development).    

    Prerequisite(s): CBR 201 , CBR 202   CBR 301 , CBR 304  

  
  •  

    CBR 402 Intrusion Detection / Cybersecurity Capstone

    3 Credits

    This course tests students on how well they are prepared to respond to the inevitable security incident.  Intrusion detection topics include incident response theory, process, and planning.  The Cybersecurity Capstone is specifically designed to provide a platform for verified learners to practice the hands-on cybersecurity skills and techniques studied throughout the Neumann Cybersecurity program. Blue team vs. red team exercises will simulate attacks designed to educate students on a real-world hack and how to stop a cyber-attack.  It also includes the evaluation of the competencies and performance tasks that enable professional cybersecurity success. At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to create a remediation plan for a simulated real-world security exposure. 

    Prerequisite(s): CBR 201 , CBR 202 , CBR 203 , CBR 401   CBR 301 , CBR 304  


Data Analytics (DA)

  
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    DA 201 Introduction to Data Analytics

    3 Credits

    Introduces the importance of data management, data analysis and data representation for organizations. Explains the science of examining raw data with the purpose of drawing conclusions about that data. Covers how organizations can successfully collect, organize, manipulate, use, prospect and present data. This course will familiarize students with the concept of data analytics and its applicability in a business environment.

  
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    DA 202 Multivariate Statistics, Probability, Multiple Regression, Linear Regression

    3 Credits

    Introduces various statistical methods for analyzing more than one outcome variable and understanding the relationships between variables. Topics include a variety of multivariate models such as MANOVA, discriminant functions, canonical correlation, and cluster analysis. Covers the laws of probability and numerous important discrete and continuous random variables.

  
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    DA 203 Database and Data Warehouse

    3 Credits

    Introduces concepts and practical implementation of database and data warehouse systems. Material covers the dominant relational model (Codd, 1970), Entity modelling, database queries using SQL. Data Warehouse(DW) elements include Dimensional modelling, different DW schemas and the use of OLAP Cubes. This is a broad overview.

  
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    DA 301 Spreadsheet Data Analysis and Business Modelling

    3 Credits

    An introduction to Data Analysis and Business Modelling via the medium of a spreadsheet tool (Microsoft Excel). This course covers the use of Excel to ask and answer important business questions. Material will cover Pivot Tables, Descriptive Statistics, trend curves, multiple regression, exponential smoothing, financial, statistical, and time functions, Monte Carlo simulations on stock prices and bidding models, basic probability and Bayes’ Theorem.

  
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    DA 302 Data Visualization

    3 Credits

    An introduction to data visualization and how it can be used to understand data and support decision making. Course will cover fundamental visualization concepts and introduce students to commercial visualization tools such as Tableau. Students will learn to clean, and import data. Charting, dates, table calculations and mapping. We’ll explore the best choices for charts, based on the type of data you are using. Course will cover different types of charts and how to choose the most appropriate ones.

  
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    DA 303 Data Mining for Business Intelligence including Predictive Analytics

    3 Credits

    Building on DA 203 (Database/Data Warehouse) this course will delve into Analytical techniques for finding hidden patterns in large data sets. Material will include classification, prediction, recommendation, data reduction, supervised learning and predictive analytics.

  
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    DA 401 Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence

    3 Credits

    Machine learning is a subset of the field of Artificial Intelligence. This course will give an overview of the principles and applications of AI and will then focus on Machine Learning (ML) . ML is a tool used to build predictive models by means of eliciting patterns from large bodies of data. Such models can be used in areas such as price prediction, risk assessment and predicting customer behavior. This course will introduce commonly used ML languages such as R and Python. The course will cover the core concepts and techniques used in several machine learning approaches, with substantial practical applications from a business point of view.

  
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    DA 402 Data Analytics Applications Development Part 1

    3 Credits

    Part of a two course capstone this course builds on the theoretical and practical underpinnings and requires students to build working Data Analytics applications to address client requirements. Students gain valuable experience with industry standard data analytics applications development tools. Course involves requirements analysis, design and first cut implementation.

  
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    DA 403 Data Analytics Applications Development Part 2

    3 Credits

    The 2nd part of a two course capstone. This course picks up where DA402 finishes with students incrementally implementing refinements, upgrades and (hopefully few) bug fixes to the applications developed in DA402.


Early Childhood Education (ECE)

  
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    ECE 101 Teaching as a Profession: PK-4

    2 Credits

    This course introduces the pre-Education major to the teaching profession at the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) level. The student is informed about teaching as a profession, the attitudes and behaviors of the professional educator, the knowledge and skills that are needed to promote quality learning of young children, and the requirements to become certified as a teacher in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  An overview of the Neumann University teacher education program is also provided.

    An overview of the Neumann University teacher education program is also provided. Students must register for the Basic Skills Tests required for certification by the Pennsylvania Department of Education as a requisite for successful completion of ECE 101. Students who are not pre-Education majors may take ECE 101 with the approval of the Dean; these students must participate in field experiences and submit all state-required clearances. 

     

    NOTE: ECE 101 Teaching as Profession is a prerequisite for all other courses in the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. Proof of a current FBI Fingerprint Clearance, Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance, and Pennsylvania Criminal Background Clearance is required and must be submitted to the Coordinator of Field Experience in order to take ECE 101 and all future Education courses.  Students may not take classes or participate in field experience or student teaching without valid clearances, as determined by the Coordinator of Field Experience.

  
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    ECE 126 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Early Childhood Education [ECE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Early Childhood Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
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    ECE 204 Child Development and Cognition I (Prenatal - 5 Years)

    3 Credits

    Child Development and Cognition I is one of a series of two courses that is designed to investigate the theory and experience of children in the perceptual, motor, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral domains of development. This course specifically addresses these constructs from the prenatal period to five years of age.  Various child development theories are studied, along with the relationship between development and family and environment, and the interrelatedness of the developmental domains.  Pennsylvania’s Core Knowledge Competencies and Early Childhood Learning Standards are studied as the guideposts for teacher candidates to provide responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment. A practicum is a required component of this course which enables students to learn and practice observation, assessment, and recordkeeping skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101   / EDU 101  

    Note: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    ECE 205 Child Development and Cognition II (6 - 9 Years)

    3 Credits

    Child Development and Cognition II is the second of a series of two courses that is designed to investigate the theory and experience of children in the perceptual, motor, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral domains of development. This course specifically addresses these constructs from six to nine years of age. Additionally, this course examines the application of the principles and theories of child development and learning in order to promote responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment in the classroom. A practicum is a required component of this course which enables students to learn observation, assessment, and recordkeeping skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and ECE 204  

    Note: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
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    ECE 214 Language Development

    3 Credits

    This course enhances the skills of practitioners currently working in the PK-4 teaching field and prepares new practitioners in education for teaching positions. The knowledge, skills, and cognitive development that specifically relate to language acquisition for PK-4 students serve as the foundations for this course. The theoretical basis of this course is constructivism that is grounded in the work of Piaget, Skinner, and Vygotsky.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

     

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.

  
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    ECE 224 Math Methods I (PK - 1st Grade)

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the teaching of mathematics to children in pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and grade 1. The course will examine methodologies appropriate to the physical and cognitive developmental stages of these children, and provide students with opportunities to gain confidence in teaching math concepts that are developmentally appropriate at this level. Through active participation and involvement in this course, students in the course will develop, implement, assess, and modify curriculum and lessons to teach children mathematical concepts and skills, as designated by state and national standards.  

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  /EDU 101  

    Note: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience. Students may not take ECE 224 Math Methods I unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
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    ECE 226 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Early Childhood Education [ECE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Early Childhood Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    ECE 240 Engaging Young Children in the Learning Process: Integrating Curriculum and Instruction

    3 Credits

    This course will examine and compare theoretical perspectives and practical applications that have influenced curriculum development in both early childhood and elementary classrooms.  The course will revolve around six key goals derived from PDE’s stated philosophy for the preparation of highly effective teachers: (1) Instruction; (2) State standards; (3) Standards-based curriculum; (4) Materials and resources for instruction, including technology; (5) Assessment; and (6) Appropriate interventions. To successfully complete this course, students must demonstrate their understanding of learning as a process that integrates all areas of development (emotional, social, language, cognitive, physical, and creative), and utilize a variety of instructional strategies so that all children can become interested and engaged in learning. Pennsylvania’s Core Knowledge Competencies and Early Childhood Learning Standards are integrated throughout the course to assist teacher candidates in their ability to provide responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

     

     

    Note: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.

  
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    ECE 245 Integrating the Arts for the Developing Child

    3 Credits

    The purpose of this course is for prospective teachers to become knowledgeable about theories and research on creativity and to develop the ability to integrate the meaningful use of arts processes and content to introduce, develop, or bring closure to lessons in any academic area.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
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    ECE 302 Literacy Methods I

    3 Credits

    Literacy Methods I focuses on the foundations for early literacy learning and the instructional strategies for teaching beginning reading and writing from Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 1. All aspects of the literacy curriculum and teaching young children reading skills before the age of formal instruction are investigated. An emphasis is placed upon effective and developmentally appropriate strategies for young children. Additionally, students examine issues that impact literacy learning, such as diversity, home-school connections, the role of play in learning, creating a print-rich environment, and oral language development. Students also learn how to implement specific literacy assessments in order to make sound instructional strategies for developing beginning readers and writers.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experienceStudents may not take ECE 302 Literacy Methods I unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
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    ECE 304 Literacy Methods II

    3 Credits

    Literacy Methods II prepares pre-service teachers to successfully teach reading and writing to students in Grades 2 through 4. Students are taught methodologies for systematic and direct instruction in reading, developmentally appropriate instruction in the mechanics and process of writing, the assessment of language arts skills, the remediation of struggling readers, instruction of ELL learners, and linking Pennsylvania Academic Standards in Language Arts to content instruction.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.  Students may not take ECE 304 Literacy Methods II unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
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    ECE 308 Math Methods II (2nd - 4th Grades)

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the teaching of mathematics to children Grades 2-4 is presented through an examination of methodologies that are appropriate to the physical and cognitive developmental stages of these children. Throughout the semester, students are provided with opportunities to gain confidence in teaching math concepts that are developmentally appropriate at this level.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.  Students may not take ECE 308 Math Methods II unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
  •  

    ECE 312 Social Studies Methods

    3 Credits

    This course prepares students to become effective early elementary social studies educators who are capable of teaching the content knowledge, intellectual skills, and civic values that are necessary for fulfilling the responsibilities of citizenship in a participatory democracy. Special attention is given to effective teaching strategies and to addressing the individual and cultural diversity of all learners. Consequently, students examine the social studies curriculum as it specifically relates to learning and development, differences in learning styles, critical thinking, problem-solving and performance skills, active learning and motivation, as well as modes of inquiry. Collaboration and supportive classroom interaction, instructional planning, assessment, reflection and professional growth, and professional leadership (based upon pedagogical standards that have been identified by the National Council for the Social Studies) are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE:  There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.  Students may not take ECE 312 Social Studies Methods unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 

     

     

  
  •  

    ECE 315 Science Methods

    3 Credits

    In Science Methods, students explore science theory, practice, and pedagogy that are based upon children’s cognitive development that is appropriate at the PK-4 grade levels. Contemporary science education research and practice, as articulated in Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology, Environment and Ecology (STEE), STEE Anchor Assessments, Benchmarks for Science Literacy, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and The National Science Education Standards, published by the National Research Council, are also analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.  Students may not take ECE 315 Science Methods unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
  •  

    ECE 326 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Early Childhood Education [ECE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Early Childhood Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    ECE 402 Family Collaboration and Community Relationships

    4 Credits

    When families, communities, and schools work together to support student learning, the results are powerful! Effective collaboration among these groups can yield results that mutually support each segment of the education community, especially the students. In this course, students learn about the complex characteristics of family units and communities. They then utilize that knowledge to create and sustain respectful, reciprocal relationships which support, empower, and involve families at all levels of their children’s development and learning. Students also develop and master strategies to increase family and community involvement in their schools. These strategies ultimately evolve into a partnership plan and/or a lesson or unit in which parents and community resources are fully integrated.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    ECE 426 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Early Childhood Education [ECE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Early Childhood Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    ECE 480 Independent Study

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of early childhood education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

    NOTE:  There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
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    ECE 490 Student Teaching Practicum: PK-4 and Special Education

    10 Credits

    In this course, students experience actual teaching under the guidance and supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor. Areas of learning include necessary observation, participation, and conferences. Regularly scheduled seminars on campus help students to analyze teaching situations and plan for effective teaching. Students may apply for their Student Teaching Practicum after all required courses have been completed, and with approval of the Coordinator of Student Teaching.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE:  All students are required to have current and valid clearances to participate in ECE 490: Student Teaching Practicum. Students may not take ECE 490 Student Teaching Practicum unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major.

Economics (ECON)

  
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    ECON 101 Introduction to Personal Finance

    3 Credits

    This course provides the fundamental knowledge needed to understand today’s economy, both domestic and abroad.  Topics include monetary and fiscal policy, the effects of fluctuations in interest rates, inflation, and exchange rates, international factors, and globalization.  It then incorporates these concepts into the remainder of the course as it relates to personal finance and retirement planning.  Many important topics will be introduced to help students be more financially educated and responsible with money, so they can make better decisions, such as spending wisely, establishing financial goals, and saving and investing for their future.  Students will learn to plan and set priorities to guide their financial decisions.  Concepts and techniques include budgeting, balancing a checkbook, protecting assets, establishing good credit, and learning about investments and ways to accumulate wealth to achieve short and long-term financial goals.

    Social Science Core Course
  
  •  

    ECON 126 Special Topics in Economics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Economics [ECON] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Economics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    ECON 200 Essentials of Economics

    3 Credits

    Essentials of Economics (ECON 200) combines the basic concepts of macro and microeconomics into one course. Students will acquire basic insights and patterns of thought for understanding key microeconomic issues such as theories of consumption, demand and supply model, cost of production and industry structures; as well as, certain macroeconomic policy measures including aggregates economic variables, fiscal and monetary policies.

    Social Science Core Course

  
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    ECON 202 Firms and Markets

    3 Credits

    Students examine the economic principles that deal with supply and demand, costs, prices, wages, rents, and the behavior of select enterprises and industries under different market conditions. Examinations of specific current economic issues affecting society, such as poverty and income distribution, are also included in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    ECON 226 Special Topics in Economics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Economics [ECON] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Economics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ECON 326 Special Topics in Economics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Economics [ECON] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Economics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ECON 426 Special Topics in Economics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Economics [ECON] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Economics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ECON 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of economics that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Education (EDU)

  
  •  

    EDU 101 Teaching as a Profession

    1 Credit

    Designed for the pre-Education major as an introduction to the teaching profession at the secondary level, this course is required as part of the process of admission to Neumann University’s programs in Secondary Teacher Certification in either Biology/Natural Sciences, English, or Social Studies. In this course, the student learns about teaching as a profession, the attitudes and behaviors of the professional educator, the knowledge and skills needed to promote quality learning, and the requirements that the student must meet in order to become certified as a teacher in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Students must register and take the basic skills test required for certification by the Pennsylvania Department of Education as a requisite for successful completion of EDU 101.  An overview of the Neumann University teacher education program is also provided.


     

    NOTE:  There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 125 Field Experience

    0 Credits

    This intensive and continuing clinical experience is an essential component of the Neumann University teacher education program.  It is taken in every semester in which a student is enrolled in teacher education courses and begins in the first year. Students will be assigned to a clinical experience that complements the education course work being taken in each semester.

     

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience

 

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