Jun 29, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy) 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy)

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Finance (FIN)

  
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    FIN 324 International Finance and Economics

    3 Credits

    This study of global finance and economics includes balance of payments; financial and global economic integration; and foreign exchange markets. The role of central banks and international financial institutions in the development and implementation of currency stabilization policies is also analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  and FIN 301  

  
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    FIN 326 Special Topics in Finance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Finance [FIN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Finance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    FIN 426 Special Topics in Finance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Finance [FIN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Finance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    FIN 427 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the field of investments with major emphasis on the valuation of stocks and bonds using present value approach.  Risk and reward are covered in detail as well as the efficient market hypothesis.  Topics covered include the structure and function of financial markets, the tax environment, financial statements analyses, mutual funds, hedge funds, commodity and financial futures, and options.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 301  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    FIN 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of finance that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


French (FR)

  
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    FR 101 Elementary French I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the French language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of French grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. French culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the French language.

  
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    FR 102 Elementary French II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on French historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Francophone world.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Modern Language Core Course

  
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    FR 126 Special Topics in French

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in French [FR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in French that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  for any French Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    FR 201 Intermediate French I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. Students review their knowledge of French grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in French.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    FR 202 Intermediate French II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition, and rigorous speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    FR 226 Special Topics in French

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in French [FR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in French that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  for any French Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    FR 301 Business French

    3 Credits

    By focusing on linguistic and cultural competence in the French business milieu, students “form a company” in the French language/culture and set up an organizational chart, design an ad campaign (which includes broadcast media as well as print), and maintain appropriate correspondence in a variety of scenarios. Vocabulary necessary to economic and marketing success are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 202 .

  
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    FR 310 Survey of French Literature

    3 Credits

    This advanced language course examines literary masterpieces in the French language within a historical perspective. Frequent compositions and discussions in French develop the student’s linguistic ability and provide an introduction to literary analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 202 .

  
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    FR 320 French Civilization

    3 Credits

    This advanced linguistic study focuses on the history, culture, geography, and customs of the people who speak the French language. Frequent practice in conversation and composition is stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 202 .

  
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    FR 326 Special Topics in French

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in French [FR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in French that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  for any French Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    FR 426 Special Topics in French

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in French [FR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in French that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  for any French Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    FR 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of French that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay indicating extensive learning and competence in French. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): FR 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Health Sciences (HSC)

  
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    HSC 100 Introduction to Health Sciences

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to the health care professions of a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist, as well as other health care professions. It examines the role of the professions in a variety of settings.   A history of health care and how it has evolved is also presented.

  
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    HSC 105 Basic Functional Anatomy

    3 Credits

    This course presents a basic overview of the musculoskeletal system as it relates to the upper extremity, lower extremity, neck and trunk. This course will give the student a basic understanding of human musculoskeletal anatomy, movement, and function. The student will gain knowledge to identify bony and soft tissue structures.

  
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    HSC 110 CPR and First Aid

    1 Credit

    A course that emphasizes the principles of first aid and basic life support for health care providers as prescribed by the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.  The course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to act as a first responder in an emergency situation until more advanced medical help arrives.  The course will consist of lectures and labs that will mimic actual emergency situations.  This course is designed for any student interested in attaining certification in CPR and First Aid.

  
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    HSC 220 Advanced First Aid and CPR

    3 Credits

    T.B.A.

  
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    HSC 240 Strength and Conditioning

    3 Credits

    This course introduces to the student a comprehensive overview of strength and conditioning principles. Topics include core concepts, training variables, and training cycles. The student will gain an understanding of the components of a strength and conditioning program.

  
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    HSC 245 Resistance Training and Conditioning

    3 Credits

    This lecture and laboratory course introduces to the student a variety of training exercises.  Activities include use of all equipment types, Olympic lifts, powerlifting, and general body exercises.   The student will be able to demonstrate proper techniques for training and lifting.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 105 , HSC 240  

  
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    HSC 260 Exercise Technique and Prescription

    3 Credits

    This course introduces to the student a comprehensive overview strength and conditioning testing and evaluation.  Topics also include anaerobic and aerobic exercise prescriptions.   The student will have a better understanding of exercise prescription, specifically anaerobic technique and prescription.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 245  

  
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    HSC 270 Program Design in Strength and Conditioning

    3 Credits

    This course prepares the student strength and conditioning for individuals in various types of physical activity, injury prevention, tissue healing concepts and how to adapt programs for injured individuals will be covered. 

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 260  

  
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    HSC 290 Advanced Strength and Conditioning

    3 Credits

    This course expands upon concepts students have previously learned related to the physical preparation of athletes.  Students will examine various periodization models used to train athletes.  Further examination of various methods used in strength training, speed development, mechanical power development, and metabolic conditioning will be done throughout the course.  Current trends and research in strength and conditioning methods will be reviewed.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 260 , HSC 270  

  
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    HSC 300 Health Risk Appraisal and Special Populations

    3 Credits

    This course provides practical information on exercise for persons with frequently occurring chronic illnesses, diseases and disabilities. An overview of each unique physiology, effects of the condition on the exercise response, effects of exercise training on the condition, and recommendations for exercise testing and programming is presented in a selected topics format. Students will also be provided with the opportunity to evaluate numerous case studies to gain more of real-world experience with designing individualized exercise programs.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 , HSC 240   HSC 305  

  
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    HSC 305 Health Risk Appraisal and Special Populations Lab

    1 Credit

    The laboratory course for HSC 300 : Health Risk and Appraisal and Special Populations provides the student with practical information on exercise for persons with a wide range of frequently occurring chronic illnesses, diseases and disabilities. An overview of each unique physiology, effects of the condition on the exercise response, effects of exercise training on the condition, and recommendations for exercise testing and programming is presented in a selected topics format. The course’s laboratory activities allow the student to receive practical experience in conjunction with the lecture topics.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100 , HSC 240   HSC 300  

  
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    HSC 310 Personal Health

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to general health management.  Topics include stress management, nutrition, eating patterns, fitness, sexual practices, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, a variety of commonly occurring diseases and lifestyle risk factors.  The student will gain an understanding of general health, how to live a healthy lifestyle, and how to recognize and identify certain diseases and common health issues across the lifespan.  Illnesses and conditions covered include, but are not limited to: obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and hyeprcholestrolemia.

  
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    HSC 320 Health Education Needs Assessment

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to assessing needs, resources and capacity for health education and promotion. Topics include methods of needs assessment, purpose of assessment and appropriate data collection. The student will gain an understanding of how needs assessment is used in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  

  
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    HSC 330 Health Education Planning

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to program planning based on the assessment of existing needs and resources. Topics include development of a planning group, mission, goals, objectives and location of resources. The student will gain an understanding of how planning is used in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  

  
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    HSC 340 Health Education Implementation

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to implement planned programs for health education and promotion. Topics include coordinating logistics of a plan, training of staff and volunteers, program delivery, program evaluation, and legal standards. The student will gain an understanding of how implementation is used in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  

  
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    HSC 350 Health Education Evaluation and Research

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to skills necessary to conduct research and evaluation related to health education and promotion. Topics include selecting, adapting and/or creating data collection instruments; collecting, analyzing and managing data; and interpretation and application of findings. The student will gain an understanding of how evaluation and research is used in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  

  
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    HSC 410 Health Education Administration

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to administration and management of programs for health education and promotion. Topics include effective leadership, financial management, technology, human resources, and maintaining relationships. The student will gain an understanding of how management and adminstration is used in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 320  

  
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    HSC 420 Health Education Resource

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to function as a resource for health education and promotion. Topics include identification of the variety of community resources, adapting health related information, and training others to use health education/promotion skills. The student will gain an understanding of how a health educator can become a resource in different practice settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 320  

  
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    HSC 430 Health Education Promotion

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the health science major to promotion health education profession. Topics include communication strategies, advocacy for health education, and advancement of health education in a variety of settings. Theses settings include community, school, health care, business/industry and college/university.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 320  

  
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    HSC 440 Biomechanics

    3 Credits

    Students examine the physical characteristics of bone, muscle, and joints in this course. They are also taught the normal and abnormal movement of the human body in relation to forces acting upon it to produce a variety of postures and gait. Through this study, they become knowledgeable in the areas of musculoskeletal anatomy, specifically as those areas relate to gait, throwing, and sport forms. An application of physics to movement [specifically, the use of Newton’s Laws to describe and analyze movement] permeates all course content. In addition, students are also exposed to the latest innovations in motion analysis equipment.

    HSC 445  

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    HSC 445 Biomechanics Lab

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course for HSC 440  Biomechanics examines the physical characteristics of bone, muscle and joints as well as the normal and abnormal movement of the human body in relation to forces acting upon it. Through this study, the student gains an in-depth knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. The application of physics to the production of movement constitutes the underlying theme for the entire course. The use of Newton’s Laws as a means to describe and analyze movement is also studied. In addition, the students learn about the latest innovations in motion analysis equipment.

    Concurrent with HSC 440 .

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    HSC 450 Physiology of Sport and Exercise

    3 Credits

    By emphasizing physiologic principles, as well as how the body reacts to activity and training, students gain a working knowledge of human activity.  The goal of the class is to provide students with an up-to-date understanding of the human body and how systems react to training and nutrition.  The course’s lab activities allow students to receive practical experiences in conjunction with lecture topics.  Areas of study include, but are not limited to, energy transfer, energy expenditure at rest and during activity, nutrition basics, pulmonary function, cardiovascular dynamics, neuromuscular systems, endocrine influences on exercise, training principles, adaptations to training, pharmacologic agents, thermoregulation, body condition, and weight control.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 , BIO 135 , BIO 131 , BIO 136   HSC 455  

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    HSC 455 Psysiology of Sport and Exercise Lab

    1 Credit

    The laboratory course for HSC 450  Physiology of Sport and Exercise provides the student with a working knowledge of human activity emphasizing physiologic principles and how the body reacts to activity and training. As a goal of the course, the student gains an up-to-date knowledge of testing and evaluation techniques of the human body and learns how all of the systems react to training and nutrition. The course’s laboratory activities allow the student to receive practical experience in conjunction with the lecture topics.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 , BIO 135 , BIO 131 , BIO 136   Concurrent with HSC 450 .

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    HSC 475 Professional Preparation for Health Sciences

    3 Credits

    The course is designed to prepare the student to enter the professional world. The course will examine different health science settings.  It will also prepare the student with resume writing, interview skills, and methods for attaining employment.

    Prerequisite(s): 75 credits earned

  
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    HSC 481 Athletic Training Observation

    1 Credit

    An observation course whereby students observe the profession of athletic training at various athletic training settings. The student will be required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of observation during the semester. Students will utilize an hour sheet and journal to track their experience. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    HSC 482 Physical Therapy Observation

    1 Credits

    An observation course whereby students observe the profession of physical therapy at various physical therapy settings. Students are required to complete hours at both in-patient and out-patient settings. The student will be required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of observation during the semester. Students will utilize an hour sheet and journal to track their experience. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  (with a minimun grade of C).

  
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    HSC 483 Occupational Therapy Observation

    1 Credit

    An observation course whereby students observe the profession of occupational therapy at various occupational therapy settings. The student will be required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of observation during the semester. Students will utilize an hour sheet and journal to track their experience. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    HSC 487 CHES Exam Prep

    1 Credit

    This course reviews the materials required to pass the NCHES (National Commission on Health Education Credentialing, Inc.) certification exam to become a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES).  It also reviews study skills and test taking skills.  

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 430 , 75 credits earned 

  
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    HSC 488 ACSM Exam Prep

    1 Credit

    This course reviews the materials required to pass the ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) certification exam to become a Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (CEP).  It also reviews study skills and test taking skills.  

    Prerequisite(s): 75 credits earned

  
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    HSC 489 NSCA Exam Prep

    1 Credit

    This course reviews the materials required to pass the NSCA (National Strength and Conditioning Association) certification exam to become a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS).  It also reviews study skills and test taking skills.

    Prerequisite(s): 75 credits earned

  
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    HSC 490 Exercise Physiology Internship Prep

    3 Credits

    In this challenging course, the student gains a working knowledge of the practical skills required to complete a clinical exercise physiology internship. The goals of the class are to provide the student with an up-to-date understanding of commonly utilized procedures and testing performed by clinical exercise physiologists. Topics of study include, but are not limited to, cardiac function testing, pediatric rehabilitation, pulmonary function testing, metabolic testing, interpretation of EKG and echocardiogram results, and equipment calibration.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 450 , HSC 455 , 60 credits earned

  
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    HSC 497 Health Educator Internship

    3 Credits

    A course whereby students participate in hands on learning experiences at various health education facilities.  The student will be required to complete a minimum of 200 hours of field experience during the semester.  Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and weekly completion of a goal sheets. Throughout their internship experience the student will make time to practice, demonstrate and become proficient in selected skills.  The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus.  Students will utilize an hours log sheet and clinical proficiency notebook to track their progress. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 320 , 75 credits earned

  
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    HSC 498 Exercise Physiology Internship

    3 Credits

    A clinical course whereby students participate in hands on learning experiences at various exercise physiology related facilities.  The student will be required to complete a minimum of 200 hours of field experience during the semester.  Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and weekly completion of a goal sheets.    Throughout their practicum experience the student will make time to practice, demonstrate and become proficient in selected skills.  The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus.  Students will utilize an hours sheet and clinical proficiency notebook to track their progress. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 490 , 75 credits earned

  
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    HSC 499 Strength and Conditioning Internship

    3 Credits

    A clinical course whereby students participate in hands on learning experiences at various strength and conditioning related facilities.  The student will be required to complete a minimum of 200 hours of field experience during the semester.  Mandatory weekly meetings are a part of this course as well as daily completion of an hour’s log and weekly completion of a goal sheet. Throughout their practicum experience, the student will make time to practice, demonstrate and become proficient in selected skills.  The Proficiencies and grading procedures are outlined on the course syllabus. Students will utilize an hours sheet and clinical proficiency notebook to track their progress. Students are responsible for identifying and securing their own site.

    Prerequisite(s): HSC 270 , 75 credits earned


History (HIST)

  
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    HIST 101 Modern Europe

    3 Credits

    This study of the development of European civilization from the 17th century to the present emphasizes the cultural, economic, political, and social aspects which have played a major role in the evolution of modern Europe.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 102 The American Heritage: 1603–1865

    3 Credits

    Students explore the early settlement of America, the drive for independence, the development of the new nation, and the emergence of conflicts that divided the nation and produced the Civil War.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 103 The American Heritage: 1865–Present

    3 Credits

    This course examines the impact of the Civil War, the rise of the Industrial Revolution, the disruption of the Great Depression, and the emergence of America as a political and economic world power.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 126 Special Topics in History

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in History [HIST] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in History that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    HIST 210 Colonial America and Revolution

    3 Credits

    The evolution of colonial American social, economic, political, and cultural institutions from the formation of the early colonies through 1776 are examined in this course.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 220 Contemporary America

    3 Credits

    The underlying social, economic, political, and cultural foundations of contemporary America from the era of the Great Depression through post-World War II society, the turbulent decade of the 1960s, and the growing conservatism of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s are examined.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 226 Special Topics in History

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in History [HIST] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in History that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    HIST 280 Modern Britain

    3 Credits

    A study of the United Kingdom from the British Empire through transformative events such as the Boer War, World War I, World War II, and the formation of the modern state.Students examine the social, political, military, and diplomatic developments of the United Kingdom since the reign of Queen Victoria.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 290 Socioeconomics and History of the Environment

    3 Credits

    The exponential growth capacity of the human species and the demand-supply relationship that is the basis of environmental managemet are examined. The issue of environmental management, exemplified in such major problems as pollution, resource depletion, and environmental decay, is a focal point of study. It is equally important to understand the environment’s influence on economic production, political structures, and attitudes that enable any society to flourish or collapse. Students analyze the hunter-gatherer, agriculturist, and industrial societies as a means to understand their current place in history.

    History Core Course

  
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    HIST 326 Special Topics in History

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in History [HIST] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in History that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    HIST 426 Special Topics in History

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in History [HIST] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in History that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    HIST 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of history that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Honors Program (HNR)

  
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    HNR 101 Freshman Honors: European History

    3 Credits

    This integrative, multidisciplinary analysis of the development of European society emphasizes the cultural, economic, political, and intellectual factors that played a major role in the evolution of modern Europe.

    History Core Course

  
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    HNR 102 Freshman Honors: Psychology

    3 Credits

    This integrative analysis of the theories and methodology of contemporary psychology pays particular attention to an understanding of human problems and behavior.

    Social Science Core Course

  
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    HNR 103 Honors: Ethics

    3 Credits

    Honors Ethics is a writing-intensive, multidisciplinary seminar that emphasizes (1) the development of logical, rhetorical, and reading skills necessary to understand argument structure, and (2) the theoretical and practical aspects of moral philosophy, including selected ethical theories. The primary aim of this course is to develop effective reading, writing, and critical thinking skills as well as to become a more reflective individual. 

    Students explore fundamental ethical questions and gain a framework which they can use to think through ethical issues that confront them as human beings, responsible citizens, and emerging leaders in a global community. Through a study of a variety of ethical approaches, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Philosophy [PHIL102] Core Course

  
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    HNR 104 Freshman Honors: Modern American History

    3 Credits

    This integrative, multidisciplinary analysis focuses on the social, economic, political, and intellectual factors that influenced the evolution of American society during the 19th and 20th centuries.

    History Core Course

  
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    HNR 105 Fr Honors: Theological Fndtns

    3 Credits

    This overview course presents a foundation in theology by introducing students to Scripture and the basic tenets of Christian faith. Personal introspection on how spirituality can and does play a role in students’ lives is encouraged by placing an emphasis on critical thinking, theological reflection, and the centrality of community. The course examines core Christian themes through the lens of the Franciscan tradition and scripture.  These themes include images of God, creation, social justice, Christology, the Reign of God, sacraments and the Church.

    Religious experience and its varied expressions are not best studied in the abstract.  Given the Catholic, Franciscan orientation of Neumann University, that tradition will be the foundation for our investigation of key themes and questions of religion.  This having been said, the course presupposes no particular religious background.  Students of all religious beliefs are invited to think critically about those beliefs and are encouraged to bring their views forward in the classroom. The primary structure of the course will be that of a seminar.  Students are expected to assume leadership in achieving course learning outcomes.

  
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    HNR 111 Freshman Honors: Music

    3 Credits

    This integrative, multidisciplinary analysis includes an introduction to the elements of music, a survey of selected musical styles, and an examination of the connections between music and other aspects of human experience.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
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    HNR 112 Freshman Honors: Rhetoric and Writing

    3 Credits

    This course challenges students to improve their skills in writing, reading, researching, and thinking both critically and reflectively.  This general research and composition course emphasizes purposeful and flexible responses to a variety of writing contexts and conventions.  Students research issues with multiple viewpoints and write a variety of research-based essays.  Students will develop writing processes and skills that are foundational for communication and collaboration in academic and professional environments.  The course assignments will be designed around a theme or a topic relevant to each student’s field of study. 

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C), or placement

    Equivalent to ENG 102, a required English Writing Core Course

    NOTE: Equivalent to ENG 102.  Students who successfully complete all required course work for the Fall semester of the Freshman Honors Program are exempted from taking ENG 101, Rhetoric and Writing I, but will still need to complete the total number of credits required of their respective degree programs
  
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    HNR 126 Honors Special Topics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Honors Special Topics courses [HNR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the University Honors Program’s curriculum. Honors Special Topics courses that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally available only to those students who have been admitted into the Neumann University Honors Program. These courses may also be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for Honors students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to Honors students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Coordinator of the Honors Program is required before a student can register for any Honors Special Topics course.

  
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    HNR 203 Freshman Honors: Literature

    3 Credits

    This integrative, multidisciplinary course analyzes works of literature as texts in a literary/expressive context, employing traditional literary critical theories and modes of inquiry.

    English Literature Core Course

  
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    HNR 220 Sophomore University Honors Seminar

    3 Credits

    The sophomore multidisciplinary seminar provides students with the opportunity to explore topics which are not available through the traditional curriculum, to work through problem-solving situations, and to develop greater critical and creative thinking skills. The limited size of the seminar, usually 15 students, creates an environment which encourages greater class participation and the chance to explore new ideas and concepts. The seminar also incorporates an interactive component which allows students to exchange knowledge and ideas with one another. To register for this course, permission of the Honors Program Coordinator is required.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102   or HNR 112  (with a minimum grade of C) and a minimum of 24 earned credits

  
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    HNR 226 Honors Special Topics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Honors Special Topics courses [HNR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the University Honors Program’s curriculum. Honors Special Topics courses that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally available only to those students who have been admitted into the Neumann University Honors Program. These courses may also be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for Honors students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to Honors students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Coordinator of the Honors Program is required before a student can register for any Honors Special Topics course.

  
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    HNR 320 Junior University Honors Seminar

    3 Credits

    The junior multidisciplinary seminar takes as its focus Neumann’s mission, which states in part that “knowledge is a gift to be shared in the service of others.”  Participants identify a problem or situation, gather pertinent information, and then devise and/or execute a plan to address the problem or situation.  The limited size of the seminar, usually 15 students, creates an environment which encourages greater class participation and the chance to explore new ideas and concepts.  To register for this course, permission of the Honors Program Coordinator is required. 

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  or HNR 112  (with a minimum grade of C) and a minimum of 55 earned credits

  
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    HNR 326 Honors Special Topics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Honors Special Topics courses [HNR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the University Honors Program’s curriculum. Honors Special Topics courses that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally available only to those students who have been admitted into the Neumann University Honors Program. These courses may also be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for Honors students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to Honors students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Coordinator of the Honors Program is required before a student can register for any Honors Special Topics course.

  
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    HNR 330 University Honors Theology Seminar

    3 Credits

    The Honors Program offers seminars in Theology that reflect specific topics of study, some of which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses can take the form of an in-depth study of a particular theme, subject area, or individual(s) of importance in the field of Theology. These seminars are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified Prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Membership in the honors program or permission of the instructor is required before a student can register for any University Honors seminar.


     

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  or HNR 105 ; PHIL 102  or HNR 103 ; Minimum of 55 credits earned.

    2nd Level Theology Core Course
  
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    HNR 340 University Honors Philosophy Seminar

    3 Credits

    The Honors Program offers seminars in Philosophy that reflect special topics of study, some of which are not part of the standard University Curriculum. These courses can take the form of an in-depth study of a particular theme, subject area or individual(s) of importance in the field of Philosophy. These seminars are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified Prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Membership in the honors program or permission of the instructor is required before a student can register for any University Honors Seminar.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  or HNR 105; PHIL 102  or HNR 103 ; and a minimum of 55 credits earned credits.

    Membership in the honors program or permission of the instructor is required before a student can register for any University Honors Seminar.

    2nd Level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    HNR 420 Senior University Honors Seminar

    3 Credits

    The senior university honors seminar serves as a capstone to the honors program.  (Other possible capstone experiences include HNR 480, Independent Study Project, and an Honors Elective in the Major of comparable scope.)  Within parameters established by the instructor, students explore a theme from multiple disciplinary perspectives through the application of critical and creative thinking skills.  The course also includes a reflection on their honors program experience and its role in their development as lifelong learners.  The limited size of the seminar, usually 15 students, creates an environment that encourages greater class participation and the chance to explore new ideas and concepts. To register for this course, permission of the Honors Program Coordinator is required.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  or HNR 112  (with a minimum grade of C) and senior status

  
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    HNR 426 Honors Special Topics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Honors Special Topics courses [HNR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the University Honors Program’s curriculum. Honors Special Topics courses that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally available only to those students who have been admitted into the Neumann University Honors Program. These courses may also be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for Honors students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to Honors students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Coordinator of the Honors Program is required before a student can register for any Honors Special Topics course.

  
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    HNR 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of the Honors Program that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Coordinator of the Honors Program and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Humanities (HUM)

  
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    HUM 126 Special Topics in Humanities

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Humanities [HUM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These interdisciplinary courses explore the nature, quality, and uniqueness of the human condition through the study of one selected facet of human experience. Special Topics courses in Humanities that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
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    HUM 200 Introduction to Arts Theory and Criticism

    3 Credits

    This interdisciplinary course examines the function of the arts in human societies and individuals. Some of the major critical theories pertaining to literary, visual, and the performing arts are also introduced. Students learn how to discern and analyze their own responses to the experience of art, and they also study the ways in which the arts reflect and transform societies and cultures.

    Prerequisite(s): Fine Arts Core. Co-requisite: English Literature Core.

    Service Learning Course

  
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    HUM 226 Special Topics in Humanities

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Humanities [HUM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These interdisciplinary courses explore the nature, quality, and uniqueness of the human condition through the study of one selected facet of human experience. Special Topics courses in Humanities that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
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    HUM 326 Special Topics in Humanities

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Humanities [HUM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These interdisciplinary courses explore the nature, quality, and uniqueness of the human condition through the study of one selected facet of human experience. Special Topics courses in Humanities that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
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    HUM 426 Special Topics in Humanities

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Humanities [HUM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These interdisciplinary courses explore the nature, quality, and uniqueness of the human condition through the study of one selected facet of human experience. Special Topics courses in Humanities that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
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    HUM 460 Interdisciplinary Seminar

    3 Credits

    This seminar is designed to effect a synthesis of humanistic learning with a focus on a specific topic each semester. Special emphasis is placed upon interconnections between the disciplines of literature, philosophy, history, music, and art.

    Prerequisite(s): HUM 200 .

  
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    HUM 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of humanities that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Possible topics might include an in-depth study of a creative artist, theme, movement, period, or genre, the subject of which is determined by the interests and needs of the individual student in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Intelligence Studies (INTEL)

  
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    INTEL 126 Special Topics in Intelligence Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies [INTEL] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  for any Intelligence Studies Special Topics course at the 300-level or above.

  
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    INTEL 200 Basic Intelligence Analysis

    3 Credits

    In this course, the basic principles of Intelligence Analysis, as practiced by the CIA, FBI, DEA, U.S. Customs, as well as other federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies are presented and discussed. Students are also taught deductive and inductive logic; formation of premise and inference; probability; hypothesis development and testing; as well as sources of information and analytical techniques, i.e., association matrix, link analysis, flowcharting, and financial analysis. Throughout the course, practical examples in investigations of organized criminal enterprises, drug trafficking, political corruption, and human smuggling are presented and discussed.

  
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    INTEL 226 Special Topics in Intelligence Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies [INTEL] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  for any Intelligence Studies Special Topics course at the 300-level or above.

  
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    INTEL 301 Strategic/National Security Intelligence Analysis

    3 Credits

    The use of force in international politics is examined in this course. Areas of study include the use of peacekeeping forces by the United Nations, the use of force by terrorists, as well as the use of American forces in such places as Somalia, Lebanon, various Middle Eastern states, and the Balkans. During their studies, students examine the planning, research, and diplomatic efforts that precede the use of military force. This course also explores the military intelligence system, particularly as that system identifies and analyzes threats, both real and perceived, to the security of the United States. Students are also required to become experts in a particular area of the world, including the language, culture, political systems, economic systems, geography, factors that impact political and economic stability, natural resources, as well as the military strength of the countries in the region.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  (with a minimum grade of B).

  
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    INTEL 302 Intelligence Analysis of Organized Crime

    3 Credits

    This course investigates the industries that are susceptible to influence and/or control by organized criminal groups, the methods used to capture the particular industry, and the economic impact that such a capture has on our society. In addition, the course also explores organized crime’s influence in the construction, garment, convention, waste removal, and waterfront industries. The criminal, civil, and administrative methods which are used to control or remove organized criminal influence from these industries are also presented and examined.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  (with a minimum grade of B).

  
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    INTEL 303 Intelligence Analysis of Terrorism

    3 Credits

    The threat of terrorism against the United States is explored and analyzed in this course. Since the primary source of terrorist activity is the Middle East and since the primary motivator of Middle Eastern terrorist groups is American support of Israel, the presence of American troops on Arab soil, and the American invasion of Iraq, the principal terrorist groups in the Middle East are studied along with the political, religious, economic, and national security concerns of the United States in the region.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  (with a minimum grade of B).

  
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    INTEL 326 Special Topics in Intelligence Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies [INTEL] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  for any Intelligence Studies Special Topics course at the 300-level or above.

  
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    INTEL 400 Electronic Intelligence Analysis

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are taught Analyst’s Notebook 6, the latest electronic analytical tool that is available to law enforcement and national security agencies. Students learn how to import financial information and use Analyst’s Notebook 6 to create graphic displays of associations and relationships between individuals, organizations, and financial institutions.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  (with a minimum grade of B).

  
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    INTEL 426 Special Topics in Intelligence Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies [INTEL] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Intelligence Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  for any Intelligence Studies Special Topics course at the 300-level or above.

  
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    INTEL 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of intelligence studies that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): INTEL 200  (with a minimum grade of B) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Interdisciplinary Studies (INT)

  
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    INT 101 The Neumann Experience

    1 Credit

    INT 101 explores the meaning of learning and education within the context of Neumann University’s philosophy and Mission. Content focuses on the concepts of self-motivated learning, values clarification, self-esteem, critical thinking, student-faculty communication, timemanagement, memory skills, and other learning techniques. This course is required of all new first-year traditional students as well as those transfer students who have had fewer than 12 credits accepted by Neumann University.

    Interdisciplinary Studies Core Course

  
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    INT 126 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies [INT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

 

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