Jun 29, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy) 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog (Final Copy)

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Interdisciplinary Studies (INT)

  
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    INT 200 Service Leadership

    3 Credits

    This service-learning course explores the understanding of servant leadership by developing and enhancing the leadership skills of students through community service activities. Students become familiar with the concepts, terminology, and principles which are related to servicelearning leadership. Participants are expected to complete at least 30 hours of community service in an assigned project.

  
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    INT 202 Exploring Diversity

    3 Credits

    This wide-ranging interdisciplinary course is designed to help students understand, live successfully in, and contribute to a diverse world. The common features of and the differences between cultures are explored - along with the multiple factors which work either to connect or to separate people. Insights are provided by a variety of disciplines, including the Franciscan tradition, which values inclusiveness and respect for all creatures, as well as Catholic Social Teachings, which uphold the dignity and inherent worth of each person. In addition, through classroom discussion and reflection, students are encouraged to explore opportunities to become agents of positive social change in society.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core and sophomore standing.

    Service Learning Course/ Diversity-certified Course

  
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    INT 226 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies [INT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    INT 326 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies [INT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    INT 426 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies [INT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Interdisciplinary Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    INT 460 Interdisciplinary Seminar

    3 Credits

    This seminar is designed to synthesize your education through a humanistic approach to learning, with special emphasis on interconnections across educational disciplines.  You will develop a research project with a focus on creativity and human potential through a synthesis of your own education and values discernment.  The course will offer opportunities to explore your own career paths and prepare yourselves for the next steps following graduation.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    INT 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of interdisciplinary studies that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


International Studies

  
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    IS 126 Special Topics in International Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in International Studies [IS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in International Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    IS 226 Special Topics in International Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in International Studies [IS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in International Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    IS 326 Special Topics in International Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in International Studies [IS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in International Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    IS 340 Europe

    3 Credits

    The evolution of 20th-century Europe is analyzed, with emphasis placed upon the development of post-World War II social, economic, and political institutions. The development of socialism, communism, fascism, and democracy as they impacted both Eastern and Western Europe throughout the 20th century is studied along with newer developments, such as the Common Market and European unity.

  
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    IS 342 Latin America

    3 Credits

    This course examines the 20th-century social, economic, political, and religious institutions of Latin America. In addition, topics relevant to current issues are included, such as regional economic development, stability, political parties, and political change as well as social movements and social change.

  
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    IS 344 Africa

    3 Credits

    The study of African society provides an appreciation for and understanding of the three aspects of the peoples of Africa: the traditional way of life, historical evolution, and contemporary situations.

  
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    IS 346 East Asia

    3 Credits

    The social, economic, and political climates of East Asia are examined by looking at the post- World War II development of Japan; major changes in post-1980 China; and the industrial growth of Southeast Asia. The impact of each culture on the international business community is also included.

  
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    IS 348 Middle East and South Asia

    3 Credits

    The socio-cultural, economic, and political climate of South Asia and the Middle East are examined. Religious and cultural patterns are studied to consider their potential impact on future developments in the region.

  
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    IS 350 Russia

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to Russian culture. Through literature, art, music, film, and historical documents, students explore the development of Russian culture from its Byzantine and Kievan roots through perestroika and to the present day. Particular emphasis is placed upon critical periods in Russian history as well as the artistic and cultural movements and figures that define those periods. No prior knowledge of Russian is necessary.

  
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    IS 426 Special Topics in International Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in International Studies [IS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in International Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    IS 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of international studies that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Italian (IT)

  
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    IT 101 Elementary Italian I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the Italian language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of Italian grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. Italian culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the Italian language.

  
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    IT 102 Elementary Italian II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on Italian historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Italian-speaking world.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Foreign Language Core Course

  
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    IT 126 Special Topics in Italian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Italian [IT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Italian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  for any Italian Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    IT 201 Intermediate Italian I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Italian. Students review their knowledge of Italian grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in Italian.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    IT 202 Intermediate Italian II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition, and rigorous speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    IT 226 Special Topics in Italian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Italian [IT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Italian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  for any Italian Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    IT 326 Special Topics in Italian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Italian [IT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Italian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  for any Italian Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    IT 426 Special Topics in Italian

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Italian [IT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Italian that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  for any Italian Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    IT 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Italian that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay that demonstrates extensive learning and competence in Italian. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Journalism (JRN)

  
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    JRN 126 Special Topics in Journalism

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Journalism [JRN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would explore a designated area of journalism, such as a particular time period or movement. Special Topics courses in Journalism at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content areas(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics Journalism course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300- level or 400-level Special Topics Journalism course, JRN 261  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 226 Special Topics in Journalism

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Journalism [JRN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would explore a designated area of journalism, such as a particular time period or movement. Special Topics courses in Journalism at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content areas(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics Journalism course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300- level or 400-level Special Topics Journalism course, JRN 261  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 255 Mass Media and Society

    3 Credits

    Exploring current issues in mass media, this course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of key topics through reading, research, writing, and oral presentations. Analyzing the present is intended to foster an appreciation of the history and development of print, broadcast, and online media. Searching for solutions brings insight into the relationship among culture, business, government, and the media.

  
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    JRN 260 News Writing and Reporting

    3 Credits

    In this introduction to journalism, students learn the characteristics of news, the basic structures and types of stories, a brief history of journalism in the United States, an introduction to writing for broadcast, and a primer on media law and ethics. Students also develop skills in note-taking, interviewing, and writing stories according to current journalism practice.

  
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    JRN 261 Reporting for New Media

    3 Credits

    Building upon skills developed in JRN 260 , students move from the written story to the multimedia package. Students are introduced to beat writing and to online content management systems while producing and posting stories, audio, and video. The opportunities and challenges of online reporting are also explored with an emphasis on current business models and ethics.

    Prerequisite(s): JRN 260  (with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    JRN 326 Special Topics in Journalism

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Journalism [JRN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would explore a designated area of journalism, such as a particular time period or movement. Special Topics courses in Journalism at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content areas(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics Journalism course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300- level or 400-level Special Topics Journalism course, JRN 261  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 350 Feature Writing

    3 Credits

    Students learn the characteristics and process of feature writing with an emphasis on creating and refining article ideas, conducting research and interviews, writing, and navigating legal and ethical questions. Online feature writing is also highlighted, particularly as it relates to multimedia journalism and new markets for publication.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 355 Editing and Design

    3 Credits

    The concepts and practice of editing and print design are introduced in this course. Students are taught how to systematically edit stories and articles, starting with a focus on structure, content, as well as balance and, then, focusing on grammar, punctuation, and AP style. Students also practice writing headlines and other story elements that enhance readability as well as learn the fundamentals of print design, including modular layout, photo cropping, and typography.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 362 Journalism Workshop I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students who have completed JRN 260 , News Writing and Reporting, and JRN 261 , Reporting for New Media, this workshop enables students to identify their strengths and interests in journalism and pursue them. They also practice writing for print, broadcast, online, and mobile media using a variety of story types, including hard news, features, commentaries, and editorials. As their skills improve and strengthen, students also explore markets for their stories.

    Prerequisite(s): JRN 261  (with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    JRN 363 Journalism Workshop II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of JRN 362 , this workshop provides a learning environment for students to advance their journalistic skills in a collaborative setting. Students practice delivering complete news packages, investigative reporting, opinion writing, and columns for print, broadcast, and online media.

    Prerequisite(s): JRN 362  with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    JRN 426 Special Topics in Journalism

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Journalism [JRN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would explore a designated area of journalism, such as a particular time period or movement. Special Topics courses in Journalism at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content areas(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics Journalism course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300- level or 400-level Special Topics Journalism course, JRN 261  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    JRN 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of journalism that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Possible topics might include an in-depth study of a specific journalist, theme, period, or movement, the subject of which is determined by the interests and needs of the individual student in consultation with his/her faculty advisor. Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): JRN 261  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Liberal Studies: Anthropology (LSANT)

  
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    LSANT 200 Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems

    6 Credits

    This introduction to the concepts and methods of cultural anthropology focuses on the wide range and variability of human cultures as well as contemporary human problems, such as cultural change, ethnicity, social stratification, urbanization, and modernization. A value-laden approach is used to discuss social issues, ethical questions, and applied anthropology.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Business Administration (LSBUS)

  
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    LSBUS 200 Introduction to Business Administration

    6 Credits

    Students are provided with an overview of the field of business and management within an organization. The managerial, legal, social, and ethical aspects of managing an organization are examined. The course is organized around the technical, behavioral, and strategic competencies that are needed for managerial effectiveness.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSBUS 220 Introduction to Human Resource Management

    6 Credits

    This seminar examines personnel/human resource management and its environment. Personnel planning, forecasting and affirmative action planning, personnel recruitment (including external and internal staffing concepts), compensation, benefits, labor-management relations, and safety issues are studied.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSBUS 240 Legal Environment of Business

    6 Credits

    This seminar examines the concept of jurisprudence, legal institutions, and the various fields of law which affect management and decision-making. The development and application of law, legal policies, and directives relative to crime, torts, contracts, affirmative action, antitrust, environment, and other newly emerging legal areas are also studied. Ethical issues are incorporated in these topics.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSBUS 260 Accounting Principles and Practices

    6 Credits

    Students are introduced to financial accounting as a system of recording, classifying, summarizing, and interpreting economic transactions for service and merchandising concerns. Accounting principles which are applicable to personal finances are included and cover the following topics: safeguarding assets; personal financial statements; budgeting; insurance analysis; and banking. Accounts and financial statements for proprietorship, partnership, corporate, and personal use are also examined. Computer software applications are utilized where appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSBUS 300 Current Issues in Business Administration

    6 Credits

    This seminar addresses the most pressing current issues of which a business administrator must have knowledge.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSBUS credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSBUS 394-396 Business Administration Cooperative Education

    Credit Varies

    Students are provided with a specific assignment with a business, government agency, or other institution involving progressive learning in a specific area of Business Administration. Progress and summary reports, the development of a portfolio, and/or the completion of a major project and regular meetings with the faculty sponsor are required. The student is evaluated by the faculty sponsor and the field supervisor. Formal application must be made to the Coordinator of Experiential Education. The student must meet with the Division Dean to obtain a faculty sponsor. Course number varies with each semester. See the Cooperative Education Program section of this catalog for further information.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Co-Op Workshop.


Liberal Studies: Computer and Information Sciences (LSCIS)

  
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    LSCIS 200 Introduction to Information Systems

    6 Credits

    This seminar teaches students how computers work, and how the components of a computer, in both their design and implementation, determine its capabilities. Students are exposed to a variety of personal, mini, and mainframe computers. They learn both how computers fulfill business objectives for centralized and/or decentralized computing and how to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. Students also have extensive hands-on experience with business software applications and use specific tools to solve real business problems which support improved decision-making.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCIS 220 Programming and Systems Analysis

    6 Credits

    The fundamental concepts of business systems analysis are introduced in this course. Topics include: the role of information systems in business; the tools of systems analysis; system design; system implementation; and control systems. A review of applications and systems technologies across a wide range of business processes is also included.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCIS 240 Database Programming and Systems Design

    6 Credits

    This seminar focuses on business problems which can be solved by designing, processing, filtering, sorting, and reporting information from large databases. Students are taught the concepts of relational databases and how to use them. Students also learn how to obtain important and necessary information from a database and how to report it for management decision-making.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCIS 260 Data Communications and Telecommunications

    6 Credits

    In this seminar, students begin with the fundamentals of business data communications, including local area networks, metropolitan area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet. At the conclusion of the seminar, students possess an understanding of physical signal paths, communications protocols, and network design. The convergence of computers and telecommunications and how these technologies are likely to impact business and decisionmaking in the future are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCIS 300 Current Issues in Information Systems

    6 Credits

    This seminar addresses the most pressing current issues in the field of information systems.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSCIS credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Criminal Justice (LSCJ)

  
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    LSCJ 120 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    6 Credits

    This survey course introduces students to selected topics within the field of criminal justice. Areas of study include the scope and goals of the criminal justice system, the definitions and explanations of related criminal justice terms, as well as the history, development, and philosophy of law enforcement in a democratic society. Students also examine agencies which are involved in the administration of the criminal justice system, classical and contemporary theories of crime, the nature and causes of crime and criminal behavior, and the relationship between law and crime.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCJ 200 Ethics and Franciscan Dimensions of Peace and Justice

    6 Credits

    The interrelated issues of peacemaking and reconciliation, advocacy for the poor, and concern for creation are explored in this course. Guided by the Franciscan philosophy and belief which embraces a reverent approach to all creation, students examine the effects of violence in the world as well as the ethical and political approaches to reducing such violence. To achieve this level of understanding, the major theoretical approaches and applications to moral reasoning and ethical issues within the context of the criminal justice system are analyzed. Examples of such issues which might be studied would be the relationship between law, morality, and theories of punishment, or an examination of civil disobedience and capital punishment. Underlying all discussions is a critical examination of the ideas, arguments, and perspectives of ethics as embodied in the Franciscan dimensions of peace and justice.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCJ 220 Judicial Process and the Law

    6 Credits

    This course analyzes the various criminal and civil laws of the American judicial system. Students examine constitutional and statutory concepts that govern the introduction and use of information, such as due process and the procedure through which an offender enters the criminal justice system. The trial process, as a formalized legal proceeding as seen from the perspective of both the prosecution and defense, is also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCJ 240 White Collar and Organized Crime

    6 Credits

    The nature of these two criminal activities and the organizations that support them in our American culture are compared and analyzed. Students also study nonviolent forms of criminal behavior, e.g., violations of trust, corruption, and economic crimes. Students also learn about the origins of organized crime, specific types of criminal activities, and law enforcement strategies to control such behavior. The economic impact of white collar and organized crime on society at large is examined as well.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCJ 260 Corrections and Rehabilitation

    6 Credits

    This course surveys the growing field of corrections and rehabilitation theory in the United States. During the semester, students become familiar with the history of institutionalized incarceration, probation, parole, and counseling the offender. Specialized programs and training for the juvenile offender are also reviewed and analyzed within the context of case studies.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSCJ 300 Victimology and the Psychology of Crime

    6 Credits

    The various ways in which crime victims are treated in and by the criminal justice system are studied. Specialized responses to victims of violence and the public’s reactions to violence are also examined in depth. Through the application of psychological theory, which discusses issues of choice and motivation, students also analyze personality variables that are associated with criminal behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSCJ credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Early Childhood Education (LSECE)

  
  •  

    LSECE 200 Child Development and Cognition Prenatal – 9 Years

    6 Credits

    Child Development and Cognition is designed to investigate the theory and experience of children in the perceptual, motor, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral domains of development. This course specifically addresses these constructs from the prenatal period to nine years of age. Additionally, Pennsylvania’s Early Childhood Learning Standards are studied as the guideposts for teacher candidates to provide responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment. Additionally, this course examines the application of the principles and theories of child development and learning in order to promote responsive instruction, curriculum, collaboration, and assessment in the classroom. A practicum is a required component of this course which enables students to learn observation, assessment, and record-keeping skills.

  
  •  

    LSECE 201 Engaging Young Children in the Learning Process: Integrating Curriculum, Instruction, and the Arts

    6 Credits

    Theoretical perspectives that have influenced curriculum development in both early childhood and elementary classrooms (Infancy to Grade 4) are examined and compared in this course. These perspectives are, then, used to analyze curricula and to make informed choices when planning instruction, selecting instructional materials, and assessing individual and group progress. This course also introduces and prepares the student to develop the reflective teaching skills that are needed to work with English language learners from Pre-K to Grade 4. To successfully complete this course, students must demonstrate their understanding of learning as a process that integrates all areas of development (emotional, social, language, cognitive, physical, and creative), and utilize a variety of instructional strategies so that all children can become interested and engaged in learning. They must also be able to demonstrate their understanding of how they combine relationships with children and families, develop effective approaches to teaching and learning, and show knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning. The course provides an opportunity for prospective teachers to become knowledgeable about theories and research on creativity and to develop the ability to integrate the meaningful use of arts processes and content to introduce, develop, or bring closure to lessons in any academic area.

  
  •  

    LSECE 302 Math and Reading Methods

    6 Credits

    This course focuses on the foundations for early literacy learning and the instructional strategies for teaching beginning reading, writing, and math from Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 4. All aspects of the literacy curriculum and teaching young children reading skills before the age of formal instruction are investigated. An emphasis is placed upon effective and developmentally appropriate strategies for young children. Additionally, students examine issues that impact literacy learning, such as diversity, home-school connections, the role of play in learning, creating a print-rich environment, and oral language development. Students also learn how to implement specific literacy assessments in order to make sound instructional strategies for developing beginning readers and writers. In addition, an introduction to the teaching of mathematics to children Grades PK–4 is presented through an examination of methodologies that are appropriate to the physical and cognitive developmental stages of these children. Throughout the semester, students are provided with opportunities to gain confidence in teaching math concepts that are developmentally appropriate at this level.

  
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    LSECE 312 Social Studies and Science Methods

    6 Credits

    This course prepares students to become effective early elementary social studies educators who are capable of teaching the content knowledge, intellectual skills, and civic values that are necessary for fulfilling the responsibilities of citizenship in a participatory democracy. Special attention is given to effective teaching strategies and to addressing the individual and cultural diversity of all learners. Consequently, students examine the social studies curriculum as it specifically relates to learning and development, differences in learning styles, critical thinking, problem-solving and performance skills, active learning and motivation, as well as modes of inquiry. Collaboration and supportive classroom interaction, instructional planning, assessment, reflection and professional growth, and professional leadership (based upon pedagogical standards that have been identified by the National Council for the Teaching of Social Studies) are also studied. In addition, students are also taught science theory, practice, and pedagogy that are based upon children’s cognitive development that is appropriate at the PK–4 grade levels. Contemporary science education research and practice, as articulated in Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology, Environment and Ecology (STEE), STEE Anchor Assessments, Benchmarks for Science Literacy, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and The National Science Education Standards, published by the National Research Council, are also analyzed.

  
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    LSECE 400 Communication, Family Collaboration, and Community Relationships

    6 Credits

    When families, communities, and schools work together to support student learning, the results are powerful! Effective collaboration among these groups can yield results that mutually support each segment of the education community, especially the students. In this course, students learn about the complex characteristics of family units and communities. They, then, utilize that knowledge to create and sustain respectful, reciprocal relationships which support, empower, and involve families at all levels of their children’s development and learning. Students also develop and master strategies to increase family and community involvement in their schools. These strategies ultimately evolve into a partnership plan and/or a lesson or unit in which parents and community resources are fully integrated. The collaborative and communicative processes between parents and professionals who live and work with students with disabilities are also examined. In addition, this course examines the nature of parent conferences, IEP meetings, co-planning and co-teaching, and how to address the concerns of families of students with special needs.


Liberal Studies: English (LSENG)

  
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    LSENG 190 Research Techniques

    6 Credits

    The focus of the course is the development, from concept to completion, of the research paper and the relationship of that research to the Experiential Learning Project. Students explore various methodologies for collecting, reporting, documenting, and presenting research findings. The total immersion and focus on research is in preparation for other seminars in the Liberal Studies Degree Program.

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    LSENG 406 English Linguistics

    6 Credits

    The history and structure of the English language is examined through an integrated process of description, analysis, and comparison. Topics in contemporary language form and function make this course particularly valuable for students who are interested in social services, education, communications, and graduate school preparation.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Health Care Administration (LSHCA)

  
  •  

    LSHCA 200 Introduction to Health Care Administration

    6 Credits

    This seminar provides an overview of health care administration in health care institutions. Topics include: major issues in health care delivery; the organization and management of hospitals and other health care facilities; public health; health care economics; public policy and legal issues; long-term care; managed care; and the conceptual, technical, and human skills of health care administration.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHCA 220 Public Policy and Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration

    6 Credits

    A focus on public policy and legal issues confronting the health care administrator is provided. Topics include: understanding the politics of health care; governmental influences in health care issues; regulation of health care; provider/patient relationship; professional liability; and access to health care.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHCA 240 Long-term Care Administration

    6 Credits

    This seminar provides detail in the delivery of health care services for patients who require long-term care, such as the elderly, the chronically disabled, pediatric cases, and persons with AIDS. Topics include: residential models; day program models; home care; assessing care; rehabilitation; human resource management of long-term care workers; networking with other agencies; team approaches to care; and ethical issues.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHCA 260 Managed Care Systems

    6 Credits

    The issues which are related to the administration of managed care are studied, including: health maintenance organizations; existing managed care models; health insurance; risk management; physician/care system relationships; contractual arrangements between hospitals and other health care providers; quality care; patient satisfaction; and the recruitment of subscribers.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHCA 300 Current Issues In Health Care Administration

    6 Credits

    This seminar addresses the most pressing current issues about which a health care administrator must have knowledge.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSHCA credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Human Resource Management (LSHRM)

  
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    LSHRM 200 Introduction to Human Resource Management

    6 Credits

    This introductory seminar examines personnel and human resource management as well as its environment. Personnel planning, forecasting, affirmative action planning, personnel recruitment (including external and internal staffing concepts), compensation, benefits, labor-management relations, and safety issues are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHRM 220 Legal Issues in Human Resource Management

    6 Credits

    This course provides a focus on the legislative and administrative laws affecting the human resource professional. Topics to be covered include: a historical overview of employee-related legislation; labor-management relations; grievance and dispute resolution; hiring and termination protocols; safety and health; harassment; and discrimination.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHRM 240 Leadership and Strategic Planning in Human Resource Management

    6 Credits

    The role of the human resource manager as both leader and planner within the context of an organization is examined. Topics to be covered include: observing and diagnosing an organization; the positioning of human resources within an organization; planning and forecasting for human resource needs; fiscal considerations in human resource planning; theories of teamwork and motivation; and research in the planning process.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHRM 260 Compensation and Benefits

    6 Credits

    This seminar analyzes the evolution and current practices of employee compensation and benefits. Topics to be studied include: development of compensation programs; job development and evaluation; wage and salary structures; gain-sharing; workers compensation; pension plans; employee assistance programs; cafeteria benefits; insurance; family leave; and out-placement.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHRM 300 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

    6 Credits

    This seminar addresses the most pressing current issues about which a human resource manager must have knowledge.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSHRM credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: History (LSHST)

  
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    LSHST 200 The American Experience

    6 Credits

    This course studies the evolution of the American nation with an in-depth analysis of those experiences in American history which have had a profound impact on the country’s development.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only
  
  •  

    LSHST 201 History and Social Systems

    6 Credits

     

    This course emphasizes the role of human behavior in the development of American history.  Students will gain an understanding of the sociological forces that have shaped history and our world.  Special focus is placed upon the emigration of people from other parts of the world and how the internal population movements shaped our present time.  A major part of the course is a study of history that examines the social, political, anthropological and military themes that have developed different generations of Americans, and that have formed the world we live in. 

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .  

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students.


Liberal Studies: Humanities (LSHUM)

  
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    LSHUM 200 Human Potential and the Arts

    6 Credits

    Human Potential and the Arts is an interdisciplinary study of the role which works of art have in human society. This course examines how these works can be more effectively analyzed, interpreted, and evaluated in relation to the role they play in the realization of each person’s full potential as a human being. Representative works from such areas as literature, film, drama, music, dance, painting, architecture, and sculpture are examined in detail.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSHUM 201-210 Foreign Language and Culture

    6 Credits Each

    Each of these individual courses is an interdisciplinary examination of a nation’s major artistic, economic, linguistic, mythical, political, religious, and social character. Each course includes the equivalent of Elementary Foreign Language II as well as an interdisciplinary cultural study. Satisfying the Liberal Studies Foreign Language Core requirement, these courses are particularly useful for business executives who must be both knowledgeable about the milieu of international markets and able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental elements of communication in the language of the target nation.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190 , LSLIT 110 , and Elementary Foreign Language Level I or its equivalent.


    Liberal Studies Foreign Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only. Specific language courses are available on a rotating schedule.
  
  •  

    LSHUM 285-289 Area Studies

    6 Credits Each

    Each course offers a historical examination of a culture other than American. Areas of study may include ancient Greece, modern Latin America, contemporary China, modern Africa, or Renaissance Italy. An interdisciplinary examination of that culture’s social, political, mythical, religious, economic, and linguistic character and development is also an integral part of this course.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Interdisciplinary Studies (LSINT)

  
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    LSINT 105 Experience, Learning, and Identity

    6 Credits

    This 6-credit integrated learning experience assists the adult learner in making his/her transition into the academic world and, more specifically, into the Liberal Studies Degree Program. Designed to introduce the student to the knowledge, skills, and processes acquired through the 6-credit seminar experience, the content which is stressed in this course includes self-assessment of goals, academic skills, critical reading, active listening, and reflective writing. Thoughtful discussions through the use of selected topics from education, literature, philosophy, psychology, natural sciences, religion, and social sciences are also included. Students develop a common Experiential Learning Project which becomes a model for their subsequent independent Experiential Learning Projects which they will develop and present in their remaining 6-credit seminars.

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSINT 209 Portfolio Development I

    2 Credits

    A portfolio consists of the identification, description, and documentation of prior learning which can be equated to college-level learning. Hence, this course is designed to provide: (1) an orientation to the process of awarding college credit for prior learning; (2) the ability to equate college-level learning experiences to actual courses taught at either Neumann University or at other regionally accredited colleges and/or universities which would normally be accepted as transfer credit; (3) a perception of prior learning in relation to personal and professional educational goals; and (4) knowledge of and practice with the skills necessary to develop a portfolio.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

  
  •  

    LSINT 210 Portfolio Development II

    1 Credit

    Portfolio Development II serves as a continuation of work done in LSINT 209  and is open to all students who have successfully completed LSINT 209 . This course helps students to complete the development of their portfolios and places particular emphasis on describing, supporting, and documenting potentially creditable prior learning which was identified in LSINT 209 .

    Prerequisite(s): LSINT 209 .

  
  •  

    LSINT 490 Themes in Interdisciplinary Study

    6 Credits

    Drawing upon and incorporating the methods and contents of academic disciplines within the Liberal Studies Degree Program Core, this course creates an integrated learning experience which explores significant and values-charged themes from varying philosophical perspectives. This seminar is a capstone study learning experience which unifies the Liberal Studies Degree Program Core Curriculum as it reflects, conveys, and is guided by the Franciscan philosophy and Mission of Neumann University. LSINT 490 is a requirement for all students who are seeking a degree in Liberal Studies.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190 , LSLIT 110 , and 42 credits of additional course work.


Liberal Studies: Literature (LSLIT)

  
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    LSLIT 110 Literature and the Adult Experience

    6 Credits

    In this seminar, students learn journal, expository, and argumentative writing and are introduced to literary concepts relating to fundamental genres and conventions. Basic word processing is taught as part of the writing process. The major types of the literature studied in the course are short stories, poems, plays, and essays which explore adult development and other issues.

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Mathematics (LSMAT)

  
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    LSMAT 200 Contemporary Mathematics

    6 Credits

    This Mathematics Core seminar addresses the use of mathematics in contemporary society. The topics addressed are the mathematics of social choice, management science, exploratory data analysis, and recursion theory.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies students only.

Liberal Studies: Management (LSMGT)

  
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    LSMGT 356 Appraisal, Coaching, and Counseling

    6 Credits

    The manager’s role as coach and counselor within the organizational setting is examined. Topics include: distinguishing between coaching and counseling; techniques and strategies in coaching; counseling; and appraising subordinates. The role of effective coaching, counseling, and appraisal systems as they relate to organizational growth and success are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): LSBUS 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies students only.
  
  •  

    LSMGT 365 International Management and Leadership

    6 Credits

    This seminar in international business management focuses on the influence of culture, law, politics, technology, and economic constraints in the modern industrial milieu. Students examine national and international managerial systems and their interrelationships as well as analyze the structure and role of the multinational corporation in an international environment.

    Prerequisite(s): LSBUS 200  or permission of instructor.

    Open to Liberal Studies students only.

Liberal Studies: Political Science (LSPOL)

  
  •  

    LSPOL 215 The Family and the Law

    6 Credits

    Students analyze the impact of law on marriage, parent and child relations, and the state of the family. Specific areas of study include pre-marital and marital property; separation, divorce, and annulment; parental care; adoption; preserving the family unit; the family in crisis (problems of alcoholism, delinquency, divorce, and separation); and the rights of the family.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Psychology (LSPSY)

  
  •  

    LSPSY 200 Introduction to Psychology

    6 Credits

    Physiological, psychological, and social derivations of human behavior are examined in the light of current psychological theory and concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 . Completion of LSPSY 200 is required before taking any other LSPSY course.

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 220 Human Development

    6 Credits

    Every individual is unique, but their uniqueness is shaped by processes and forces which are common to all human beings. This course examines the human being from a developmental perspective. Through texts, class discussion, and student projects, significant stages and processes in human development are described and analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 240 Psychopathology, Diagnosis, and Remediation

    6 Credits

    This advanced seminar examines psychological diagnostic procedures, classification, and symptomatology of psychopathology as well as an overview of the principal forms of therapy.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 245 Interpersonal and Group Processes

    6 Credits

    The nature of small groups and group interactions are evaluated in this course. Topics include: interpersonal communication, leadership, decision-making, group pressure, persuasion, and attitude formation.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 260 Topics in Clinical Counseling

    6 Credits

    Students interested in psychological service delivery are introduced to the tools and processes which are used by mental health workers. Topics include: the variety of work arenas for the mental health worker; diagnostic process and assessment techniques; direct service delivery models, including counseling and psychotherapy; and indirect service delivery models, such as consultation and organizational development.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 300 Current Issues in Psychology

    6 Credits

    This seminar addresses the most pressing current issues in the field of psychology.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 12 LSPSY credits (with a minimum grade of C).

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 346 Theories of Personality Development

    6 Credits

    The major theories of personality and human development and their application to all phases of the human life span are explored in this seminar. The psychodynamic, behavioristic, humanistic, and cognitive viewpoints are examined, along with the current issues and problems which are frequently encountered in the study of childhood, adolescence, maturity, aging, and dying.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 350 Psychology of Parenthood

    6 Credits

    This study of psychology and parenthood includes such topics as: biological and evolutionary consideration; psychological experience of pregnancy and childbirth; parental roles of the mothering person and the fathering person; and the psychological influences of parents on children and children on parents. The emotional needs of parents and children, parental responsibilities and satisfactions, the family as a system, intergenerational considerations (e.g., grandparents), the one-parent family, and marriage without children are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSPSY 355 Dreams and Altered States of Consciousness

    6 Credits

    This introduction to the study of altered states examines such areas as definitions, varieties, histories of study, methods of study, physiological and psychological models, issues of personal growth, and public policy. Other topics include dreams and other sleep-related states, such as reverie, fantasy, and creative inspiration; rite and symbol in altered states; meditation and mystical experience; hypnosis, biofeedback, and autogenic training; states chemically induced and facilitated; paranormal perception and action; play, sex, and dying as altered states; and ethical and professional issues in the use of altered states.

    Prerequisite(s): LSPSY 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Science (LSSCI)

  
  •  

    LSSCI 200 Science and Society

    6 Credits

    The effects of the natural sciences and technology on the individual and contemporary society are examined in this course as students explore the sciences and their relationships to social, political, and economic issues. Areas of study vary each semester. Topics of study may include such biological topics as genetics, population, health issues, or ecology; or such physical science areas as physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and astronomy. This broad view of science and its impact on society incorporates methods of scientific inquiry and problem-solving techniques through which specific topics are investigated, developed, connected, and applied to both the individual and contemporary society. Relationships between the science disciplines and their connections with current events are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Sociology (LSSOC)

  
  •  

    LSSOC 200 Dynamics of Social Change

    6 Credits

    This course offers students a survey of the sociological dynamic which impacts on social order and change. A macro-view of this dynamic is applied to such contemporary issues and problems as inequality, racism, sexism, poverty, alienation, education, and change in Third World countries.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
  •  

    LSSOC 337 Socialwork: Theory and Practice

    6 Credits

    As an introduction to the primary methods of social work intervention, this course focuses on core knowledge which includes: individual casework skills, group process skills, community organization, and advocacy. In addition, students explore the diversity of social work career opportunities in both the public and private sectors. A practical component of this course stresses interviewing skills and implications that are frequently associated with the social worker’s “Code of Ethics.”

    Prerequisite(s): LSSOC 200 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
 

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