Nov 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Education (EDU)

  
  •  

    EDU 126 Special Topics in Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 202 Educational Psychology

    3 Credits

    This course examines the basic theories of human development and learning and their implications for the teaching-learning process.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  /  EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 215 Teaching ELLs: Language, Culture and Diversity in the Classroom

    3 Credits

    This course is a comprehensive overview of the elements of second language acquisition and their impact on content learning in order to meet the needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) in today’s diverse classrooms.  An emphasis will be placed on defining culture and addressing cultural differences within the classroom. Pre-service teachers will learn how to plan and deliver lessons that allow English Language Learners to acquire academic knowledge as they develop proficiency in the English language.  Students will be taught a variety of teaching strategies and activities that can be utilized with all students, including ELLs.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 220 Foundations of Modern Education

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to modern education through a study of the history, philosophy, principles, and administration of education. In addition, public and non-public schools are studied in their social settings.

    Prerequisite(s):  PSYCH 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 226 Special Topics in Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 230 Introduction to Exceptionalities

    3 Credits

    In this course, students gain an understanding of persons with various disabilities and/or exceptionalities and the presence of these individuals in instructional settings. Emphasis is placed upon special education law and policies, historical foundations, as well as strategies for making curriculum, instruction, and assessment available for all students, regardless of their ability, behavioral differences, learning style, and cultural differences.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.  EDU 230 Intro to Exceptionalities is a prerequisite for all other Special Education courses.
  
  •  

    EDU 248 Technology for Education

    3 Credits

    This course provides for a hands-on overview of the media which are commonly used in early childhood and elementary classrooms today. Special attention is given to the use of computers within the classroom and to the techniques for their effective utilization, i.e., selection of appropriate software, Internet access, writing with computers, and classroom management issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 320 Assessment Methods

    3 Credits

    In this course, secondary education students gain an understanding of assessment and identification of pupils with special needs, the present level of their performance, instructional and assessment strategies, as well as timelines and types of assessment. Students are also taught the complex practice of the assessment process and how it is used in making educational decisions. Curriculum-based assessment, norm-referenced tests, and performance-based assessments used to evaluate student learning and the effectiveness of teacher instruction are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 326 Special Topics in Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 350 Methods and Materials in Secondary Education

    3 Credits

    This examination of the many modes of secondary teaching methodology includes the analysis, application, and evaluation of instructional materials and their appropriateness for diverse populations.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 380 Behavioral Disorders and Social Emotional Disturbance

    3 Credits

    In this course, secondary education students gain an understanding of models and theories of behavior, the least restrictive environment, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, instructional planning, and assessment of students with behavioral disorders and social and emotional disturbances.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 426 Special Topics in Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Education [EDU] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 461 Senior Seminar I

    1 Credit

    To effectively prepare students for their Student Teaching Practicum or Educational Studies Internship experience, Senior Seminar I must be taken the semester prior to student teaching. Throughout the course, time is allotted for students to reflect on their thoughts, questions, and concerns about their pending experience. Other portions of the course are devoted to guiding students as they work to complete their pre-student teaching and pre-internship requirements and become familiar with the placement process. Students gain information on professionalism, ethics in the workplace, and the interview process. Students prepare portfolios that will serve to collect and document examples of their work, learning, and growth during their practicum/internship experience to provide evidence that the student developed the competencies of the degree.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  .  Senior status in the major and, for dual certification education students a passing score on each of the state-mandated basic skills assessment (Reading, Writing, and Math).

    NOTE: All students are required to have current and valid clearances to participate in ECE 461: Senior Seminar I. Dual certification education students may not take ECE 461 unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
  •  

    EDU 462 Senior Seminar II

    2 Credits

    Senior Seminar II must be taken as a supplement to the Student Teaching/Internship experience. Throughout the course, time is allotted for students to share their experiences in an effort to process issues, problems, successes, and areas in need of improvement with their supervisors. Other portions of the course are devoted to the presentation and sharing of information regarding the educational professions in order to adequately prepare students to be prospective and viable candidates for employment. Educational issues, professional portfolio materials, certification, professional organizations, and interviewing procedures are some of the many topics covered in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    Note: All students are required to have current and valid clearances to participate in ECE 462: Senior Seminar II. Dual certification students may not take ECE 462 unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major. 
  
  •  

    EDU 470 Literacy in the Content Areas

    3 Credits

    Applications of linguistics, reading theory, the nature of reading, current practices, and materials of instruction comprise the focus of this course. Skills include grouping plans, word attack strategies, critical reading, study skills, and individualized instruction.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and conditions of the University’s ISP Policy, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    EDU 497 Practicum in Secondary Education

    10 Credits

    In this one-semester experience in practice teaching at the secondary level, students apply their knowledge of specific subjects and pedagogy in a secondary school under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Students may apply for this Student Teaching Practicum experience after all required major and professional courses have been completed, and with approval of the Coordinator of Student Teaching.

    NOTE: All students are required to have current and valid clearances to participate in EDU 497: Practicum in Secondary Education. Students may not take EDU 497 unless they have been officially accepted to the major. 
  
  •  

    EDU 498 Educational Studies Internship

    4 Credits

    This course prepares the student to work in a professional setting in an education-related environment under the guidance and supervision of a qualified employee and a University supervisor.  Areas of learning include observation, participation in meetings, client support; and the development and support of other tasks and projects as designated by the placement.  Regular seminars on campus help students to reflect on, analyze, and consider alternate responses to workplace circumstances. 

    NOTE: Students are required to have valid clearances to participate in the internship experience.

Special Education (SPEC)

  
  •  

    SPEC 126 Special Topics in Special Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Special Education [SPEC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Special Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230 .

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 212 Assistive Technology

    3 Credits

    In this course, the technology that is used to help the instructional, language, and social needs of individuals with disabilities is studied. Students are also taught to identify and use specialized resources to implement instructional strategies that have been specifically designed for individuals with disabilities. Students are further expected to demonstrate the use of appropriate adaptations and technology for all individuals with disabilities; to identify resources and techniques which are used across all transition points to allow for the effective transition of individuals with disabilities; and to create an optimal learning environment by utilizing, evaluating, modifying, and adapting the classroom setting, curricula, teaching strategies, materials, and equipment.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 222 Learning Disabilities

    3 Credits

    This course provides students with an understanding of the Least Restrictive Environments and continuum of services, development of academic and functional performance needs of students with learning disabilities, individual learning differences, instructional strategies, and learning environments for students with learning disabilities.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 226 Special Topics in Special Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Special Education [SPEC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Special Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230 .

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 310 Inclusive Education

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students to gain knowledge about the academic and functional performance needs of students with disabilities, identifying and planning instruction for learning differences, the development of instructional strategies, and the appropriate learning environments for students in inclusive settings.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience. Students may not take this course unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major.
  
  •  

    SPEC 320 Assessment methods: Summative, Formative, Diagnostic, and Benchmark

    3 Credits

    In this course, students learn about assessment and the identification of individuals with special needs, their present level of performance, instructional and assessment strategies, and timelines and types of assessment. Students also examine the complex practice of the assessment process and how that process is used in making educational decisions. Students are also introduced to curriculum-based assessment, norm-referenced tests, and performance-based assessments that are used to evaluate student learning and the effectiveness of teacher instruction.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 322 Foundations of Autism

    3 Credits

    Students are taught the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of early intervention of Autism Spectrum Disorders, characteristics and etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders, as well as assessment and identification of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. A Field experience is required in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 326 Special Topics in Special Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Special Education [SPEC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Special Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230 .

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 380 Behavioral and Social Emotional Disorders

    3 Credits

    This course teaches students about the models and theories of behavior, the least restrictive environment, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, instructional planning, as well as assessment of students with behavioral disorders and social and emotional disturbances.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 401 Differentiated Instruction

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to teach students about the academic and functional performance needs of individuals with disabilities. Students learn to identify and plan instruction for learning differences, as well as develop instructional strategies and appropriate learning environments for students in inclusive settings. Students demonstrate efficient differentiated instruction activities and an understanding of the efficient planning, coordination, and delivery of effective instruction that are required for inclusive settings.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience. Students may not take this course unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major.
  
  •  

    SPEC 415 Intensive Reading and Writing Instruction

    3 Credits

    An understanding of intensive instructional strategies in reading and writing that meet the needs of pupils with disabilities is the focus of this course. Students are expected to demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the components of reading and writing and describe how these areas pose challenges for students. They are also taught to clearly articulate and model the use of explicit and systematic instruction in the teaching of literacy (reading and writing) for students with disabilities across all reading levels, and to identify evidence-based instructional practices that help students with disabilities succeed with reading and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  /EDU 101  , EDU 230 ECE 302   and ECE 304  

    Service Learning Course

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience. Students may not take this course unless they have been officially accepted to the Early Elementary (PK-4) and Special Education (PK-8) major.
  
  •  

    SPEC 424 Collaboration and Communication

    3 Credits

    The collaborative and communicative processes between parents and professionals who live and work with students with disabilities are examined. The course also addresses parent conferences, IEP meetings, co-planning and co-teaching, and how to address the concerns of families of students with special needs.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 426 Special Topics in Special Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics in Special Education [SPEC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Special Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are open only to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and  EDU 230  

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.
  
  •  

    SPEC 480 Independent Study

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of special education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 101  / EDU 101  and  EDU 230 , and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy, as well as any additional clearance requirements as determined by the Division of Education and Human Services.

    NOTE: There is a required field component for this course.  All students are required to have valid clearances to participate in field experience.

English (ENG)

  
  •  

    ENG 094 Successful Writing

    3 Credits

    This course develops the student’s ability to express ideas clearly in essays of adequate length that show facility with language and an understanding of an essay’s structure. Designed to motivate the student to engage in writing as a communication process and not just an implementation of correct rules, the course helps the student develop his/her basic analytic skills, such as abstracting and generalizing, and incorporate those skills in the writing of an essay from thesis to conclusion. Through a process approach to writing, the student is introduced to drafting, revising, and editing techniques. In addition, he/she may engage in peer feedback workshops and, when possible, threaded discussions in electronic environments. In addition to learning structures for communicating ideas, the student is also introduced to principles of language choices, word usage, as well as rules for varied sentence structures and grammar. To enroll in ENG 101 , Rhetoric and Writing I, the student must pass this course, or he/she will be required to repeat it.

    This course can only be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.
    (Credits for this course are not applicable toward a degree)
  
  •  

    ENG 100 Foundations in Rhetoric

    3 Credits

    This course develops the student’s ability to express ideas clearly in essays and to increase the student’s reading ability through a personal and critical exploration of texts. Through a recursive process of reading and writing, the student will be introduced to drafting, revising, and editing techniques. In addition to learning structures for communicating ideas, the student will also be introduced to principles of language choices, word usage, as well as rules for varied sentence structures and grammar.

    No student who has passed ENG 101, ENG 102, or HNR 112 with a C or better is permitted to enroll in this course.

     

    To be taken concurrently with ENG 101 .

  
  •  

    ENG 101 Rhetoric and Writing I

    3 Credits

    In ENG 101, students are introduced to processes for writing, reading, researching, and thinking that are both critical and reflective. Students explore expressive, informative, analytical, and persuasive aims of discourse that help them respond to a variety of academic and workplace writing situations. This general composition course with an emphasis on genres is delivered in a “blended” teaching environment. ENG 101, designed for subsequent success in effective written communication, is a prerequisite to ENG 102 .

    Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENG 101 or successful completion of ENG 094 . To progress to ENG 102 , Rhetoric and Writing II, students must complete ENG 101 with a minimum grade of C.

    English Writing Core Course

  
  •  

    ENG 102 Rhetoric and Writing II

    3 Credits

    Building on the experiences in ENG 101 , ENG 102 challenges students to further strategies for writing, reading, thinking critically, researching, and thinking reflectively. This general composition course emphasizes flexibility of response to a variety of writing contexts and conventions. Students research topics with opposing viewpoints, and write various source-based arguments. Active note-taking processes and skills for formal writing that are foundational for communication and collaboration in academic and professional environments are emphasized. The course assignments may be designed around a theme or a topic, or a student may self-select a topic, depending upon the instructor’s syllabus.  Students must complete ENG 102 with a minimum grade of C. 

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C), or placement.

    English Writing Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 103 Dimensions of Literature

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the literary genres of fiction, poetry, and drama with the goal of developing an appreciation and understanding of how works of literature are created.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 104 The Many Faces of Comedy

    3 Credits

    In this course, students engage in an exploration of comedy in literature, film, and related art forms. Individual comic works are studied in depth, along with the forms, styles, and major theories of comedy, and related literary and film criticism. Students continue the development of their critical abilities through written and oral presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 120 World Mythology

    3 Credits

    This course investigates world mythology and a sampling of the narratives that have served - and still continue to serve - as touchstones to a shared human cultural consciousness. Images in art and film supplement literary examples.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 126 Special Topics in English

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in English [ENG] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an intensive study of a selected theme, genre, or literary phenomenon, such as science fiction, the art of nonfiction, the Franciscan influence on the lyric, or Arthurian romance. Special Topics courses in English that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics English course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300-level or 400-level Special Topics English course, ENG Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 200 Children’s Literature: Windows on the World

    3 Credits

    This introductory literature course, especially recommended for Early Elementary (PK-4)/Special Education (PK-8) majors, surveys a wide range of classic and contemporary children’s literature. Students explore the historical development of this body of literature, the challenge of defining it, its roles as mirror and shaper of culture, and some of the resources and organizations available for those who teach literature to children. Students are encouraged to develop at least one special interest paper on non-required texts.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102  

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 204 Nature Writing

    3 Credits

    This course will introduce you to the literary genres of non-fiction, fiction, and poetry through writing that explores the natural world and our place in it. Through reading, discussion, writing and reflection, you will develop an understanding of how these works are crafted and how they illustrate and explore essential and universal issues that are relevant to our lives, from the ecological to the sublime.

    You will also engage creatively with the writing process by composing original works modeled on those forms and approaches to nature writing that we are reading.  You will have the opportunity to write journals, essays, travelogues, short fiction and poetry that has nature as a subject, theme or literary device.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  

    Literature Core

    Advanced writing option for the  Major or Writing Minor

    Poetry option for the Major

  
  •  

    ENG 205 Religious Experience in Literature

    3 Credits

    Students are engaged in an interdisciplinary exploration of literary expressions of the relationship between God and the universe, including the poetic, dramatic, cinematic, and narrative articulation of individual faith experience both in biblical and non-biblical writing. Through a special focus on expressions of spiritual quest, mystical and apocalyptical experiences, and the mystery of evil, students come to an appreciation of the way in which religious beliefs and traditions illuminate the forms, ideas, and significance of particular classical and contemporary works of literature.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 . 

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 220 The World of Drama

    3 Credits

    The World of Drama is designed to make students conversant with dramatic structures for several significant periods in literary history, and to nurture a lifelong appreciation for this genre. Drama blends narrative text with performative arts. Plays are intended to be performed in theatrical productions, and often they are adapted to film. Students will read and analyze select plays that were written and performed at different times-from ancient Greece to the 21st century. Through close analysis of characters’ dialogue, action in the plot, setting that is both historic and sociocultural, students will consider a range to conflict that complicates characters’ lives, yet allows students to consider their values in relation to those portrayed in the drama. For several plays, students will analyze a film adaptation. 

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 226 Special Topics in English

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in English [ENG] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an intensive study of a selected theme, genre, or literary phenomenon, such as science fiction, the art of nonfiction, the Franciscan influence on the lyric, or Arthurian romance. Special Topics courses in English that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics English course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300-level or 400-level Special Topics English course, ENG Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 230 The Pleasures of Poetry

    3 Credits

    This course serves to expand and sharpen one’s natural responses to poetry by developing an understanding of poems through creative and imaginative reflection together with analytical procedures that focus on the elements of poetry and the way they work together to shape a poem and involve the reader.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 235 Peer Tutoring of Writing

    3 Credits

    The goals of this course are to survey contemporary theory in the field of composition studies, use the central concepts of this field to gain greater understanding of the teaching and tutoring of writing at both the secondary and postsecondary levels, apply the insights of this understanding to aid students’ abilities to critique and revise both their own writing and that of students encountered in peer tutoring arrangements, and to increase competence in analytical thinking, writing, and research skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of B).

  
  •  

    ENG 240 The Art of the Short Story: Mirrors of Experience

    3 Credits

    The short story is studied as a genre and art form with special emphasis on the styles of literary imagination and critical theories which are used to investigate them. Course content ranges from the beginnings of the short story to its modern manifestations. The achievements of major figures and the cultural contexts within which they wrote are investigated.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 250 Young Adult Literature: Educating the Imagination

    3 Credits

    This course, especially recommended for prospective teachers of English, explores a representative sampling of literature suitable for study in secondary schools, such as award winning books intended for junior high youth, classic and contemporary coming-of-age fiction, other novels dealing with significant social issues, one or two plays, and a selection of poems. Attention is given to the historical development of literature for young people, its roles as mirror and shaper of culture, and to critical approaches, organizations, and instructional resources relevant to teaching literature in the new millennium. Students are encouraged to develop at least one special-interest paper on non-required texts.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  (with a minimum grade of C) or placement into ENG 102 .

    English Literature Core Course/ Diversity-certified Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 274 Creative Writing: Fiction

    3 Credits

    This introduction to the craft and art of writing short stories or a novella is conducted as a writer’s workshop. Students are encouraged to share character sketches, structures for stories, and brief narratives in a mutually supportive small-group environment. Feedback, the cornerstone of improving writing, is emphasized as a critical component of the revision process. To understand different techniques for developing setting, plot, structure, character development, tone, and style, students read models of exemplary stories to analyze the writers’ techniques. A portfolio is required as part of the student’s evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  and English Literature Core (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 275 Creative Writing: Poetry

    3 Credits

    This introduction to the craft and art of writing poetry is conducted as a writer’s workshop in which students are encouraged to share poems that they write in a mutually supportive small- group environment. To understand types of poetry, students also read models of exemplary poems to analyze structure and style and, occasionally, to imitate. A portfolio is required as part of the student’s evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  and English Literature Core (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 276 Creative Writing: Scriptwriting for Theater and the Electronic Media

    3 Credits

    Students examine scriptwriting principles and practices for the stage, as well as for informational, persuasive, and entertainment programming in radio and television. Course work includes the creation and critique of scripts in addition to the study of scripting techniques. The course also focuses on working methodologies, formats, client satisfaction, and the effective use of the written word within visual and auditory contexts.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 277 Creative Nonfiction Essay Writing

    3 Credits

    Designed as a writing workshop, this course improves each writer’s prose style, structure, and content as well as challenges each student to develop nonfiction essays about topics of personal interest. Models of nonfiction essays in the creative nonfiction genre are examined to see how published writers develop and execute their ideas. Structural patterns for organizing several types of nonfiction essays, such as the memoir, personal essay, literary journalistic essay, critical essay, and segmented essay are studied.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 290 Crime and Literature

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to drama, non-fiction and fiction.  It is designed to develop greater appreciaton and understanding of creative literature and to increase competence in analytical thinking and writing.  The selections for this course have been specifically chosen in an attempt to appeal to the interests of the criminal justice major.  Some assignments will be completed in Blackboard.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequistie:  ENG 101  (English Literature Core Course) with a C or better.

    English Literature Core Course/ Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 300 Shakespeare and His Legacy

    3 Credits

    This exploration of Shakespeare examines his great works as representative of their age, yet as a transformative influence on the English language and on our understanding of human nature.  Students are introduced to recurrent Shakespearean themes and motifs, significant issues in Shakespearean scholarship and theatrical performance, and the diverse art forms and reinterpretations that continue to expand his timeless legacy.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    ENG 303 Literature and Film

    3 Credits

    By comparing two different art forms which use works of literature and films adapted from those works, this course attempts to establish the definitive characteristics of both art forms, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and the problems of film adaptation through analysis, discussion, and film script projects.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

    Diversity-certified Course

  
  •  

    ENG 310 American Literary Heritage: 17th - 19th Centuries

    3 Credits

    This study of American literature from its beginnings through the end of the 19th century offers an in-depth consideration of representative prose, poetry, and fiction. Students explore prevailing themes and literary strategies, as well as the vision and values underlying this literature.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 320 Romantic and Victorian Literature

    3 Credits

    The rise of romanticism in the 18th century and its further transmutations in the succeeding century are studied with readings from the works of prominent British writers of the Romantic and Victorian periods.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 326 Special Topics in English

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in English [ENG] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an intensive study of a selected theme, genre, or literary phenomenon, such as science fiction, the art of nonfiction, the Franciscan influence on the lyric, or Arthurian romance. Special Topics courses in English that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics English course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300-level or 400-level Special Topics English course, ENG Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 330 Literature of Foreign Cultures

    3 Credits

    A representative treatment in translation of African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and Hispanic literatures demonstrates the vibrancy of the global imagination and the richness of foreign cultures.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 340 European Literary Masterpieces

    3 Credits

    Literary masterpieces from the European continent which highlight the search for meaning in human life are analyzed in this course. Important continental writers such as Goethe, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Colette, and Calvino are examined in translation.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 358 Writing: Process and Product

    3 Credits

    This course explores theories about composing processes and how they affect the ways in which educators teach and assess writing. Topics include writing assignments; responding to written texts; evaluating written performance; teaching rewriting; developing positive attitudes about writing; understanding diverse composing processes; discovering strategies for shaping discourse; teaching grammar and sentence fluency; developing sequenced writing tasks that are connected to reading; and integrating computers and writing to support learning. A service learning experience is required.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 360 The Age of Reason: The Long 18th Century

    3 Credits

    This course surveys English literature from the Renaissance to the beginnings of Romanticism, an age paradoxically characterized by great wit and sentiment.  Drama, poetry, and the birth of the novel are studied through the works of both canonical figures such as Milton, Wycherley, Defoe, and Johnson, and also previously marginalized authors crucial to an understanding of the period such as Cavendish, Behn, Finch, and Montagu.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 365 The Age of Enchantment: Medieval Literature

    3 Credits

    Adventure, magic, mystery, and romance form the backdrop of this course which highlights Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales). Legends such as those of King Arthur and his Round-Table knights and of Tristan and Isolde and their magic philtre of undying love show how language, theme, and motif constitute the ageless enchantment of the medieval period.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 375 The Golden Age: English Renaissance Literature

    3 Credits

    The English Renaissance - the age of Shakespeare and the other literary giants of the Elizabethan period - is widely regarded as the time when English literature reached its greatest height. Against the rich and colorful background of that age, this course explores the timeless works, ideas, and innovations of such major writers as Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 380 American Literature of the Modern Age

    3 Credits

    This course surveys American writing in the first half of the 20th century, an exciting period of great artistic innovation and rapid change. Significant trends and developments are explored and related to their intellectual and historical backgrounds.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 385 Modern British and Irish Literature

    3 Credits

    This course examines the works of important British and Irish authors of the first half of the 20th century. Students review the historical, literary, and artistic contexts that brought about the movement called Modernism which had a major influence on all the arts in an increasingly metropolitan world. Authors were influenced by or reacting to a wide range of Victorian concepts and ideas as well as the impact of World War I, resulting in ground-breaking creative approaches to themes, forms, and structure in poetry, fiction, and drama, as seen in the works of authors such as Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Yeats, Woolf, and Eliot.

    Prerequisite(s): (English Literature Core; Co-requisite: HUM 200 )

  
  •  

    ENG 390 The Rise of the Novel

    3 Credits

    This study of the development of the novel in 18th- and 19th-century England includes reading and discussion of representative novels from Richardson to Hardy and focuses on style, narrative form, and characterizations.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 400 Aesthetic Theory and Literary Criticism

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an opportunity to explore some of the most important movements in aesthetic theory and literary criticism, from Aristotle to Deconstruction and beyond. Through the close readings of primary literary texts, coupled with primary critical and theoretical articles, students learn to both understand and apply these methods of inquiry to literature.

  
  •  

    ENG 405 The English Language

    3 Credits

    This course offers a study of the historical development of the English language, its contemporary variants, and its present-day functioning as a communication system. Students who intend to teach, who are preparing for graduate school, or who are interested in communication theory will find this course particularly rewarding.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 410 Exploring Major Novels

    3 Credits

    This course provides students the opportunity for in-depth exploration of diverse novels, drawing from the British Isles, Europe, and the American continents. Overarching themes, historical periods, and regions of origin will vary each time the course is offered.

  
  •  

    ENG 420 Chaucer and the Flowering of English Literature

    3 Credits

    This corse examines Chaucer’s language, versification, poetry, and sources as the humanistic fountainhead of the English literary tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 426 Special Topics in English

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in English [ENG] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. These courses would take the form of an intensive study of a selected theme, genre, or literary phenomenon, such as science fiction, the art of nonfiction, the Franciscan influence on the lyric, or Arthurian romance. Special Topics courses in English that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): For a 200-level Special Topics English course, ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C); for a 300-level or 400-level Special Topics English course, ENG Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 430 Contemporary Writers

    3 Credits

    Representative works from diverse cultures from both within the United States and around the world are examined and evaluated in critical detail, as students explore how literary techniques and themes reflect the modern world and its concerns.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 440 Diversity in Drama

    3 Credits

    Major developments in global drama from Ibsen, Brecht, and Pinter, to Baldwin, Lorca, Gomez-Pena and others are studied in this course, as well as film adaptations of their works. Readings from selected works and from dramatic theory and film criticism, as well as influences that affected styles and techniques of 20th-century theater, are also examined. When possible, attendance at productions is arranged.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.

  
  •  

    ENG 455 Advanced Analytical Writing

    3 Credits

    This advanced writing course takes an interdisciplinary approach to such higher-level essay forms as definition; cause and effect; comparison and contrast; and analogy. Students develop their thinking and writing skills required by each form. Revising processes focus on applying conventions for improved style. This course is strongly recommended for those students who are interested in attending either law school or graduate school.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 475 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

    3 Credits

    This is an advanced level of the writer’s workshop in which students are encouraged to share poems that they write in a mutually supportive small- group environment. Students continue reading  models of exemplary poems to analyze structure and style and, occasionally, to imitate. A portfolio is required as part of the student’s evaluation.
     

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  and ENG LIT Core (both with minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    ENG 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of English that is not covered in scheduled courses, such as a specific author, genre, theme, period, or movement, may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG Literature Core and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
  •  

    ENG 490 Gender and Literature

    3 Credits

    As an appreciation and analysis of literature by both men and women through gender-focused readings, “Feminist” and “reader-response” criticism are two ways of unraveling the biases that gender roles, literary influences, reader expectations, and human relationships create in a literary work of art. Milton, Lawrence, Hemingway, the Brontës, the Shelleys, Glaspell, Dinesen, and others are the focus of discussion of gender issues in fiction, poetry, and drama from Genesis to the 20th century.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core.


Environmental Studies (ENV)

  
  •  

    ENV 105 Introduction to Environmental Studies

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on a theoretical description of the interdisciplinary structure of environmental studies. Students examine the core premise of ecology as the basis for environmental studies while simultaneously analyzing its connections to social, political, economic, ethical, and technological points of view.

    Science Core Course when combined with ENV 115

  
  •  

    ENV 115 Environmental Studies Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This laboratory course introduces students to the techniques and resources which are available for the study of the impact of human activity on the environment. Through a series of laboratory experiences, students learn to apply these techniques and resources to the study of various topics, such as waste; air and water pollution; habitat; organic farming; as well as other environmental issues.

    Concurrent with ENV 105 .

    Science Core Course when combined with ENV 105

  
  •  

    ENV 126 Special Topics in Environmental Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies [ENV] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ENV 226 Special Topics in Environmental Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies [ENV] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ENV 326 Special Topics in Environmental Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies [ENV] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ENV 426 Special Topics in Environmental Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies [ENV] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    ENV 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Environmental Studies that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Farsi (FARSI)

  
  •  

    FARSI 101 Elementary Farsi I

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the Farsi language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of Farsi grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. Farsi culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the Farsi language.

  
  •  

    FARSI 102 Elementary Farsi II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on Farsi historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Farsi-speaking world.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Modern Language Core Course

  
  •  

    FARSI 126 Special Topics in Farsi

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Farsi [FARSI] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Farsi that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  for any Farsi Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    FARSI 201 Intermediate Farsi I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Farsi. Students review their knowledge of Farsi grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in Farsi.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
  •  

    FARSI 202 Intermediate Farsi II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition, and rigorous speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
  •  

    FARSI 226 Special Topics in Farsi

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Farsi [FARSI] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Farsi that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  for any Farsi Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    FARSI 326 Special Topics in Farsi

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Farsi [FARSI] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Farsi that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  for any Farsi Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    FARSI 426 Special Topics in Farsi

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Farsi [FARSI] which reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Farsi that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  for any Farsi Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
  •  

    FARSI 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Farsi that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay that demonstrates extensive learning and competence in Farsi. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): FARSI 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Finance (FIN)

  
  •  

    FIN 126 Special Topics in Finance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Finance [FIN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Finance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    FIN 226 Special Topics in Finance

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Finance [FIN] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Finance that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
  •  

    FIN 301 Principles of Financial Management

    3 Credits

    This course is about learning the tools for measuring performance of companies, evaluating investment projects, and financial planning. Topics that we are presented are used by the corporate financial manager every day. They include ratio analysis, cash flow analysis, time value of money, valuation of assets, and cost of capital, capital budgeting and financing policies.

    Prerequisite(s):  ACT 103 , BUS 202  and ECON 101  (each with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    FIN 307 Wealth Management

    3 Credits

    This course examines wealth management and provides an overview of the major components of financial planning in these areas: consumption planning, tax planning, insurance planning, retirement planning, and estate planning.  Throughout, focus is placed on the practical application of portfolio management and asset allocation for wealth management clients.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 301  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    FIN 317 Money and Banking

    3 Credits

    This course examines the economics of financial markets in the management of domestic and international financial institutions.  Topics include the determination of asset prices, the risk and term structure of interest rates, foreign exchange markets, capital and money markets, the role of the Federal Reserve and how monetary policy affect interest rates, and the overall economy.  Current developments in the financial system are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 301  (with a minimum grade of C).

 

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