Feb 03, 2023  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Liberal Studies: Sociology (LSSOC)

  
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    LSSOC 339 Child and Family: A Socialwork Approach

    6 Credits

    Students explore social work’s historic commitment to and methods of treatment which are available to children and their families in their social context. The course also examines the emergence and distinctive treatment components of community-based intensive family treatment programs.

    Prerequisite(s): LSSOC 200 . Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.


Liberal Studies: Theology (LSTHE)

  
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    LSTHE 200 Ideals in Conflict

    6 Credits

    By providing a formal definition for both theology and philosophy, including their similarities and essential differences, this course explores some of the major ethical issues of contemporary human experience. Special attention is given to ways of understanding issues which seem to oppose or are in tension with one another: science and revelation; reason and faith; as well as human concern and law. The meaning and significance of human decision-making in relation to such life/death issues as war and euthanasia are also examined. Theological and philosophical understandings converge and are applied to moral questions during class discussions and projects.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only
  
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    LSTHE 201 Comparative Religions

    6 Credits

    This seminar examines the concept of God and the relationship of God to the individual as well as the meaning and purpose of human life. The ways in which humankind has attempted to communicate with its deities are also explored. Through lectures, discussions, and guest speakers, students compare the answers to these fundamental issues as set forth in the teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The seminar takes a historical approach to understanding theology.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Liberal Studies Core Course

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.
  
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    LSTHE 275 The Mystery of Death

    6 Credits

    There have always been unanswered questions about dying and death. Is death the end or just the beginning? Is there another life beyond this one? Is there a return to this life after death, even if in another form? Are there people who have died and come back to life? This coruse addresses these and many other related questions.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110 .

    Open to Liberal Studies Degree students only.

Liberal Studies: Independent Study Project/Special Topics

  
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    LS____ 126 Special Topics in Liberal Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies [LS___] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110  are required before any Special Topics course can be taken.

  
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    LS____ 226 Special Topics in Liberal Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies [LS___] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110  are required before any Special Topics course can be taken.

  
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    LS____ 326 Special Topics in Liberal Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies [LS___] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110  are required before any Special Topics course can be taken.

  
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    LS____ 426 Special Topics in Liberal Studies

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies [LS___] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Liberal Studies that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  and LSLIT 110  are required before any Special Topics course can be taken.

  
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    LS____ 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Liberal Studies that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190 , LSLIT 110 , and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Management (MGT)

  
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    MGT 100 Principles of Management

    3 Credits

    The basic managerial functions and reviews the key principles and theories that have influenced the field of management since the advent of the modern corporation are introduced in this course. Topics covered include: the evolution of management thought, international management, planning and decision-making, organizing and managing human resources, motivating and leading, and management’s social and ethical responsibilities. A Challenge Examination is available for this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Completed or enrolled in ENG 101 .

  
  •  

    MGT 126 Special Topics in Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Management [MGT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 226 Special Topics in Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Management [MGT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 242 Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits

    This course introduces you to individual and group behavior and related psychological processes that take place in work environments. Organizational behavior or organizational psychology is the scientific study of the workplace. We will focus on topics such as surface and deep level diversity and how such diversity affects workers and work environments, interpersonal dynamics in group process and teamwork, motivation, job attitudes and organizational commitment, organizational communication, leadership, conflict resolution and negotiation, stress and well-being, and organizational culture. It applies scientific research methods and psychological concepts and theories to industrial and organizational behavior. The major objective of organizational behavior is to maximize both the well-being of organizational members (e.g. employees) and organizational effectiveness. A basic understanding of and knowledge of social science research findings, social psychology, personality, and sociology are particularly relevant to this course. You will use your critical thinking skills and apply psychological and sociological theories and concepts to problems and questions that may be experienced in an organization or in the workplace.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 305 Human Resource Management

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to the strategic role of the human resource function in contemporary organizations. Topics include the legal and regulatory environment of human resource management, as well as job analysis and design. Recruiting, selecting, managing, and developing employees’ performance, as well as compensation and benefits administration, are studied.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 242  or PSYCH 370  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 308 Compensation and Benefits

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on compensation in organizations. Topics include forms of pay, internal alignment, external competitiveness, determining individual pay, employee benefits, and managing the pay system. The course will also explore ethical issues in compensation including gender inequality, executive compensation, and the living wage.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 305  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 322 International Management

    3 Credits

    Students gain an understanding of global management issues in this course and learn to prepare international management reports for participating companies which operate in the Tri-State area. Students also solve cases as they become familiar with the environment, operation, and culture of global enterprises.

    Prerequisite(s):  MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MGT 326 Special Topics in Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Management [MGT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MGT 415 Production and Operations Management

    3 Credits

    This course examines the design, operation, and control of an enterprise’s production system as well as its capacity planning, scheduling, forecasting, and operation simulation.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 202  and  MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 418 Training and Development

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the training and development aspect of human resources.  Topics include needs assessment, learning outcomes, instructional methodologies, training evaluation, training delivery, and employee development. Students will design, facilitate, and evaluate a mini training session to hone their skills.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 305  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MGT 420 Global Business Practices

    3 Credits

    This course has an International Trip Component! Travel Required

    This course examines the practical aspects of doing business globally.  Students will learn a methodology for preparing international business plans that include evaluating the export potential of a local firm, analyzing its competitiveness, and identifying international partners in the targeted markets. Students also learn about export promotion, export financing, and export documentation.  Students will assess the export readiness of a firm, conduct international market research, develop strategies to enter those markets, and develop promotional strategies in the selected countries

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 321  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MGT 426 Special Topics in Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Management [MGT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MGT 428 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

    3 Credits

    This course offers expanded coverage of current key concepts covered in other courses related to the Human Resources Track including organizational behavior, human resources management, training and development, and compensation.  Students will refine their HR-focused writing and oral presentation skills while also building developing their knowledge base on current topics in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 305  (with a minumum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MGT 460 Seminar in Management Policy

    3 Credits

    This seminar provides students with a survey of firms, their operations, and future trends in managing enterprises. As the course progresses, major stakeholders in each firm are identified; and students are provided with a framework to understand the factors that create changes in relationships with those stakeholders. Active learning is promoted by introducing simulated business cases in which students have to make business decisions that will impact the operation of the entire enterprise. They also learn about business strategies from guest speakers and recent business articles. Within this seminar, students develop a strategic plan for a local company and present that plan to the class.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior-level Accounting, Business Administration, CIM, or Marketing majors.

    This course should be taken during the student’s final semester prior to graduation.
  
  •  

    MGT 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of management that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Marketing (MKT)

  
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    MKT 100 Principles of Marketing

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic marketing concepts and the skills needed to define problems, identify opportunities, interpret their implications, and make decisions in a variety of marketing management situations. Topics include: marketing decision-making; consumer behavior; marketing strategies; and the development of comprehensive marketing plans. Case studies are also introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): Completed or enrolled in ENG 101  (minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 126 Special Topics in Marketing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Marketing [MKT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Marketing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    MKT 226 Special Topics in Marketing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Marketing [MKT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Marketing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 301 Consumer Behavior

    3 Credits

    This course acquaints students with the findings and theoretical basis of the consumer behavior discipline as well as develops skills, concepts, and findings in the design and analysis of marketing programs. Topics include: the effects of demographic, social, and psychological variables on buying behavior; levels of buyer involvement; and ego-identification which are seen as determinants in the decision process.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 305 Retail Marketing

    3 Credits

    This comprehensive introduction to retail marketing examines the major areas of retail practice and strategies for large and small retailers. Topics include: the classification of retailers; franchising; planning and organizing the retail firm; managing human resources; merchandise management; sales and service; and control.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 310 Marketing Research

    3 Credits

    Students are taught the basic techniques of marketing research and develop skills in using research data to make marketing decisions. Topics include: the formulation and design of marketing research; the data collection process; data analysis; and the applications of research in the planning process. This course also makes use of computer-aided research methods.

    Prerequisite(s): BUS 202  and MKT 100  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 315 Advertising and Promotion

    3 Credits

    This comprehensive analysis of the role of promotion in the marketing plan introduces students to the major components of promotion, i.e., advertising, publicity, personal selling, and sales promotion. Students also examine how these components are combined to develop overall promotional strategies; how promotion fits into the overall marketing plan; and how the success of promotion in the marketing mix is evaluated. This course also examines the promotion environment, including the legal, social, and ethical issues which marketing professionals encounter.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Service Learning Course

  
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    MKT 320 Sales Force Management

    3 Credits

    In this analysis of the selling function and the role and responsibilities of the sales force manager, students analyze the sales force organization as well as the processes of forecasting, staffing, directing, controlling, and evaluating manpower performance. The allocation of sales effort and compensation practices are also reviewed.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 323 International Marketing

    3 Credits

    The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of marketing, selecting, and entering global markets. Students examine strategies of building and protecting market shares in light of significant economic, cultural, political, and legal differences in the global marketplace.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 326 Special Topics in Marketing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Marketing [MKT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Marketing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 426 Special Topics in Marketing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Marketing [MKT] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Marketing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MKT 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of marketing that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Mathematics (MATH)

  
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    MATH 092 Developmental Algebra

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to improve student competence in algebra. Topics include: basic algebraic expressions; operations with polynomials; equations and inequalities; and introductory graphing.

    The course can only be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.
    (Credits for this course are not applicable toward a degree)
  
  •  

    MATH 102 Introductory Statistics

    3 Credits

    As an elementary statistics course with emphasis on applications, topics include: data classification, frequency distributions, central tendency, variation, probability, binomial distributions, poisson distributions, normal distributions, sampling, and estimation.

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”). (Mathematics Core Course)

    Mathematics Core Course

  
  •  

    MATH 103 College Algebra

    3 Credits

    College Algebra is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the usual topics in algebra needed by students for later work in mathematics, engineering, business, statistics, or the natural sciences. Topics covered include solving equations, functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, as well as triangle trigonometry.

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”). A Challenge Examination is available for this course.

    Mathematics Core Course

  
  •  

    MATH 106 Mathematical Decision-making

    3 Credits

    As a course for anyone who is interested in the general use of mathematics in today’s world, a variety of topics in modern mathematics are included, such as the mathematics of social choice, logic, graph theory, and the mathematics of growth and symmetry.

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”).

    Mathematics Core Course

  
  •  

    MATH 108 Foundations in Mathematics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide students with practice in, and examples of, the use of mathematics in the real world. Arithmetic, algebra, statistics, and probability are explored, including applications and practical techniques of each.

    No student who has passed MATH 102, MATH 103, MATH 110, or any higher-level MATH class with a C or better is permitted to enroll in this course.

     

    To be taken concurrently with MATH 102  

  
  •  

    MATH 110 Precalculus

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to mathematical concepts that are centered on the idea of a function. Throughout their study, students learn about solving equations, functions, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, trigonometric functions, as well as triangle trigonometry and trigonometric identities. Learning objectives for this Mathematics Core course include an analytical understanding of the basic concepts of algebra as well as how to apply, in practical terms, these concepts of expressions, equations, functions, and graphing to real-life situations.

    Prerequisite(s):  MATH 103  (with a minimum grade of B) OR EQUIVALENT

    Mathematics Core Course

    A Challenge Examination is available for this course.
  
  •  

    MATH 116 Quantitative Methods

    3 Credits

    Designed to meet the needs of business students, this course combines graphing techniques, linear programming, matrices, and the basic concepts of calculus, including limits, derivatives, integrals, and appropriate applications.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (either with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MATH 126 Special Topics in Mathematics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Mathematics [MATH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Mathematics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any 100-level Mathematics Special Topics course: Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”); for any 200-level Mathematics Special Topics course or above: MATH Core.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    MATH 202 Applied Statistics

    3 Credits

    This is an advanced statistics course.  Topics presented include: sampling distributions, point estimates, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, nonparametric methods, contingency tables and goodness of fit.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MATH 203 Experimental Design

    3 Credits

    This is an advanced statistics course. Topics presented include: Completely randomized design, randomized block design, factorial design, nested design, Latin squares design, split-plot design, incomplete block design, and miscellaneous designs.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MATH 205 Mathematical Modeling for Teachers II

    3 Credits

    This course meets the needs of future teachers and aligns to the mathematics competencies found in the CORE and PAPA assessments. Topics include Numbers and Quantity (ratios and proportional relationships, real number system, and quantities) and Algebraic Functions (numbers and algebraic expressions, reasoning with equations and inequities, interpreting and building functions, solving word problems, linear equations, and  nonlinear functions).

    Prerequisite(s): PLACEMENT into the course by SAT scores or Accuplacer exam results OR successful completion of MATH 092 .  

     

    MATH 205 is the required MATHEMATICS Core Course for Teacher Education majors who have not met Basic Skills requirements through SAT or ACT test scores.  Students are required to meet all required pre-requisites to enroll in this course, including meeting established scores on Accuplacer testing. This course is intended for Education majors only. 

    This course is intended for Education majors only.  

  
  •  

    MATH 206 Mathematical Modeling for Teachers III

    3 Credits

    This course meets the needs of future teachers and aligns to the mathematics competencies found in the CORE and PAPA assessments. Topics include Geometry, Measurement, and Statistics and Probability.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 205  

    This course is intended for Education majors only. 
  
  •  

    MATH 225 Applied Calculus

    3 Credits

    A strong algebra background is required in this introduction to the basic concepts of calculus.  The approach is intuitive rather than rigorous.  Topics of study include limits, continuity, differentiation, and the definite and indefinite integrals.  Applications are related to the social, biological, and physical sciences, as well as to economics.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 103  or MATH 110  (either with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MATH 226 Special Topics in Mathematics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Mathematics [MATH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Mathematics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any 100-level Mathematics Special Topics course: Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”); for any 200-level Mathematics Special Topics course or above: MATH Core.

  
  •  

    MATH 250 Calculus I

    3 Credits

    Students who register for this course are expected to have a strong mathematics background in both algebra and trigonometry. Topics of study include limits, continuity, differentiation with applications, the definite and indefinite integrals, as well as derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions. Learning outcomes for this course include the ability to analyze, graph, and manipulate a variety of functions; solve a variety of problems using calculus; and communicate mathematical concepts in both an oral and written format.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 110  (with a minimum grade of C)

  
  •  

    MATH 251 Calculus II

    3 Credits

    In this course, students learn how to solve a variety of mathematical problems using calculus. Topics of study include applications of integration, transcendental functions, as well as techniques of integration and polar coordinates.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    MATH 275 Linear Algebra

    3 Credits

    This course will focus on the theory and applications of vector and matric algebra. Topics include solutions of systems of linear equations, matrix arithmetic, matric inverses, linear transformations, basis and dimension, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, and general vector spaces.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  with a minimum grade of C.

  
  •  

    MATH 290 Discrete Mathematics

    3 Credits

    Introduction to discrete mathematical structures with applications in computer science. Topics include sets, relations, functions, basic logic, proof techniques, the basics of counting, graphs and trees, and discrete probability.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  with a minimum grade of C.

  
  •  

    MATH 325 Technology in Mathematics

    3 Credits

    Through this course, students will become familiar with the use of technological systems used to assist in mathematic calculation and computation.  Work with MAPLE and programming in MATLAB will be a primary focus. Also included will be work with the TI series graphing calculators, generic and array formulas in Excel, and mathematical notation writers such as those in Microsoft Word.  Several projects will be included providing practice with the technology while exploring various disciplines within mathematics. 

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  with a minimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 326 Special Topics in Mathematics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Mathematics [MATH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Mathematics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any 100-level Mathematics Special Topics course: Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”); for any 200-level Mathematics Special Topics course or above: MATH Core.

  
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    MATH 350 Calculus III

    3 Credits

    In this continuation of MATH 251 , students learn to work with infinite series and power series, as well as vectors and vector-valued functions. By solving a variety of problems using calculus, students enhance their ability to communicate mathematical concepts in both an oral and written format.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MATH 351 Calculus IV

    3 Credits

    This course extends the concept of a function to functions of several variables. By solving a variety of problems using calculus, students are able to understand such topics as partial derivatives, multivariable functions, as well as multiple integration and vector analysis. The ability to communicate mathematical concepts in both an oral and written format is also stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 350  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    MATH 360 Differential Equations

    3 Credits

    A substantial part of this course is composed of applications of ordinary differential equations and the methods used in solving them. Included are solving first and higher degree linear differential equations, and series solutions.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 350  with a minimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 372 Mathematical Statistics

    3 Credits

    A calculus-based overview of the concepts of probability and mathematical statistics is presented in this course. Topics of study include descriptive statistics, the fundamentals of probability, and univariate probability distributions. In this course, students learn to effectively communicate mathematical concepts in both an oral and written format.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 351  (with a minimum grade of C) or permission of the instructor.

  
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    MATH 373 Mathematical Statistics II

    3 Credits

    This course builds on the topics covered in MATH 372  . By solving a variety of problems using calculus, students are able to understand such topics as hypothesis testing, parameter estimation, regression, and analysis of variance. The ability to communicate mathematical concepts in both an oral and written format is also stressed. 

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 372   with a minimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 375 Abstract Algebra

    3 Credits

    This course studies the structures in which algebra is possible.  Groups, subgroups, factor groups, rings, fields, and polynomial rings will be studied.  Applications in electronics, cryptology, and logical reasoning will also be covered. 

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 275  with a mimimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 380 Geometry

    3 Credits

    This course studies the spatial relationship of points and magnitudes in 2- and 3-dimensions.  Both axiomatic and constructive approaches will be used to explore Euclidean geometry.  Non-Euclidean geometry will also be explored.  

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  with a minimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 405 Numerical Analysis

    3 Credits

    This course will cover floating point arithmetic, polynomial approximation of functions, interpolation theory, numerical differentiation and integration, Gaussian elimination, numerical solutions to differential equations, and error analysis.  This course makes extensive use of the mathematics software MatLab.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 360  and MATH 325  both with minimum grade of C.

  
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    MATH 426 Special Topics in Mathematics

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Mathematics [MATH] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Mathematics that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any 100-level Mathematics Special Topics course: Satisfactory performance on the Math Placement Test or completion of MATH 092  (with a grade of “P”); for any 200-level Mathematics Special Topics course or above: MATH Core.

  
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    MATH 460 Senior Seminar

    3 Credits

    Students will synthesize the concepts they learned and skills they acquired in previous math courses by conducting research in a field of their interest.  Students will present their work in a public forum. The history of mathematics will be woven throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 351  with a minimum grade of C.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    MATH 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of mathematics that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH Core and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.

  
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    MATH 495 Internship

    3 Credits

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Students must register on the waitlist for this Internship Course. Once the student has attended a pre-internship appointment with Career & Personal Development and completed the paperwork with required signatures for an Approved Internship Site, the student will then be given permission to register for this course. Permission to register will be sent to the student’s email. Once a student has permission to register, they will have 7 days to register for this course. Please make sure to check your email on a regular basis while on any waitlist for a course.

  
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    PHY 130 General Physics with Calculus I

    3 Credits

    First of a two-course sequence teaching fundamental physics to math majors. Students who take PHY 130 may not receive credit for PHY 107. Topics include: description of motion, inertial and non-inertial frames, special relativity, Newton’s Laws, translational and rotational equilibrium, one- and two-dimensional motion, fundamental forces, inverse square laws, Gauss’ Law, Bohr’s quantization, rotational dynamics, potential energy, black holes, determinism and chaos

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  with a minimum grade of C.

    Science CORE

  
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    PHY 131 General Physics with Calculus II

    3 Credits

    Second of a two-course sequence teaching fundamental physics to math majors. Students who take PHY 130 may not receive credit for PHY 107. Topics include: electrostatics, capacitors, charges in motion, insulators, semiconductors, conductors, superconductors, voltage and current measurements, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, magnetic materials, quantum dots, magnetic resonance phenomenon.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  with a minimum grade of C.

    Science CORE

  
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    PHY 135 General Physics with Calculus I Lab

    1 Credit

    Selected experiments parallel topics covered in PHY 130.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 250  minimum grade of C. Concurrent with PHY 130  minimum grade of C.

    Science CORE

  
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    PHY 136 General Physics with Calculus II Lab

    1 Credit

    Selected experiments parallel topics covered in PHY 131.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  and PHY 130  both minimum grade of C. Concurrent with PHY 131  minimum grade of C.

    Science CORE


Music (MUS)

  
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    MUS 101 Introduction to Music

    3 Credits

    This examination into the elements of sound and their organization as musical forms emphasizes the development of listening skills. Students gain an understanding of fundamental musical concepts and explore the nature, creation, and function of music through a wide sampling of recorded and live music.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    MUS 102 Music in America

    3 Credits

    This course examines American musical life from Colonial times to the present and emphasizes the originality and variety of America’s folk, jazz, popular, and art music through literature, discussion, recorded illustrations, and concerts.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    MUS 103 Introduction to Classical Music

    3 Credits

    As a study of the changing forms and styles of Western classical music from the Middle Ages to the present, this course develops the ability to place a musical composition in a historical context and to relate music, in general, to other art forms.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    MUS 104 Popular Music

    3 Credits

    This survey of popular musical styles emphasizes active listening and a consideration of cultural contexts. Students gain an understanding of fundamental musical concepts and explore the nature, creation, and function of music through a wide sampling of various styles of popular music. During their course of study, students also consider how these styles developed, and how they are connected.

    Fine Arts Core Course/ Diversity-certified Course

  
  •  

    MUS 111 Fundamentals of Music

    1 Credit

    By emphasizing the technique of reading Notes, students with no previous musical experience are provided with a study of the basic elements of music. Through weekly practice sessions in a classroom, students learn to recognize musical Notes and how to read in syllables with pitches. The primary goal of this course is for students to be able to read music by the end of the semester. By doing so, they gain an understanding of other music courses offered at the University in addition to strengthening their own confidence and building a greater musical awareness. Since this course is not a private lesson in voice, singing technique is not included as part of the curriculum.

  
  •  

    MUS 121 Guitar

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies guitar for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied guitar may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments

  
  •  

    MUS 122 Guitar

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies guitar for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied guitar may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments

  
  •  

    MUS 123 Bass Guitar

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies electric bass guitar for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied bass guitar may register for two credits (one- hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 124 Bass Guitar

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies electric bass guitar for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied bass guitar may register for two credits (one- hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 126 Special Topics in Music

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Music [MUS] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Music that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    MUS 131 Jazz Ensemble

    1 Credit

    This series of courses is designed to expose the student to the repertoire of the typical jazz ensemble. The student participates in rehearsals and performances of the Neumann University Jazz Ensemble. Big band music and arrangements of music in various jazz and popular styles constitute the bulk of the repertoire. The student who continues to progress to the upper-level courses (e.g., courses at the 300- and 400-level) is expected to assume greater responsibility for the organization and leadership of the ensemble. Students may elect to participate in the Neumann University Jazz Ensemble on a non-credit basis by auditing any of these courses. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 132 Jazz Ensemble

    1 Credit

    This series of courses is designed to expose the student to the repertoire of the typical jazz ensemble. The student participates in rehearsals and performances of the Neumann University Jazz Ensemble. Big band music and arrangements of music in various jazz and popular styles constitute the bulk of the repertoire. The student who continues to progress to the upper-level courses (e.g., courses at the 300- and 400-level) is expected to assume greater responsibility for the organization and leadership of the ensemble. Students may elect to participate in the Neumann University Jazz Ensemble on a non-credit basis by auditing any of these courses. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 133 Wind Ensemble/Concert Band

    1 Credit

    These courses are designed to expose the student to the repertoire of the typical wind ensemble, a range that includes both classical and popular genres. The student also participates in rehearsals and performances of the Neumann University Wind Ensemble; and smaller groups may be drawn from the Ensemble for more advanced work. As the student progresses to upper-level courses, he/she is expected to assume greater responsibility for the organization and leadership of the Ensemble. Students may also elect to participate in the Ensemble on a non-credit basis.

  
  •  

    MUS 134 Wind Ensemble/Concert Band

    1 Credit

    These courses are designed to expose the student to the repertoire of the typical wind ensemble, a range that includes both classical and popular genres. The student also participates in rehearsals and performances of the Neumann University Wind Ensemble; and smaller groups may be drawn from the Ensemble for more advanced work. As the student progresses to upper-level courses, he/she is expected to assume greater responsibility for the organization and leadership of the Ensemble. Students may also elect to participate in the Ensemble on a non-credit basis.

  
  •  

    MUS 135 Chamber Music Ensembles

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student participates in rehearsals and performances of Western chamber music for Western instruments (including strings, keyboards, woodwinds, brass, guitar, and percussion). Throughout each semester of study, students focus on the principles of good ensemble and individual playing as well as the development of a unique style for each ensemble selection. Exceptional students may register for 2 credits with the written approval of both the instructor and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 136 Chamber Music Ensembles

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student participates in rehearsals and performances of Western chamber music for Western instruments (including strings, keyboards, woodwinds, brass, guitar, and percussion). Throughout each semester of study, students focus on the principles of good ensemble and individual playing as well as the development of a unique style for each ensemble selection. Exceptional students may register for 2 credits with the written approval of both the instructor and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 141 Chorus

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student is given the opportunity to gain experience in group and ensemble singing. Theoretical and musical concepts are presented through the choral literature selected for the semester.

  
  •  

    MUS 142 Chorus

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student is given the opportunity to gain experience in group and ensemble singing. Theoretical and musical concepts are presented through the choral literature selected for the semester.

  
  •  

    MUS 151 Study in Piano

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies piano for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied piano may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 152 Study in Piano

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies piano for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied piano may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 161 Study in Voice

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies voice for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied voice may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 162 Study in Voice

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies voice for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied voice may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    MUS 171 Brass Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies a particular brass instrument for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied a brass instrument may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 172 Brass Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies a particular brass instrument for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied a brass instrument may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 173 Percussion Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies percussion instruments through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced levels of performance ability. Exceptional students who have previously studied percussion may register for 2 credits (one-hour private lesson once a week) with the written approval of both the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences

  
  •  

    MUS 174 Percussion Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies percussion instruments through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced levels of performance ability. Exceptional students who have previously studied percussion may register for 2 credits (one-hour private lesson once a week) with the written approval of both the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences

  
  •  

    MUS 181 Woodwind Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies a particular woodwind instrument for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied a woodwind instrument may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

  
  •  

    MUS 182 Woodwind Instruments

    1 Credit

    In this series of courses, the student studies a particular woodwind instrument for credit through 30-minute private lessons once a week. Levels of proficiency progress from elementary to advanced. Exceptional students who have previously studied a woodwind instrument may register for two credits (one-hour lesson once a week) with the written approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences. Students must supply their own instruments.

 

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