Nov 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Social Work (SW)

  
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    SW 310 Interpersonal Relationships

    3 credits

    Human connection takes place in the context of relationships. This course presents an analysis of various types of relationships through use of theory and research. Multiple types of relationships are critiqued including lovers, mates, family members, and friends. Emphasis is on communication and support, sexual attraction and attitudes, rejection and betrayal, aggression and violence, loss and conflict, and intervention methodologies within the context of relationships. Relationship experiences of children, adolescents, young and mature adults, older adults, heterosexual and homosexual individuals from a cross-cultural, multicultural sample are examined.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 315 The Client Interview

    3 credits

    SW 315 will address the interview process as it pertains to the relationship with the client. Interpersonal skills, interviewing, history taking, and goal setting are emphasized. This course prepares students for generalist practice in the field of social work. A solution based focus will be emphasized. Basic knowledge of social work intervention will be introduced, including multiple systems that impact client social and psychological functioning. Connecting initially and throughout the interview process is imperative to helping. Motivational interviewing techniques teach social work professionals the ways in which specific communication processes can enhance communication for a more effective and in-depth interview experience. These techniques are consistent with the social work professions core values.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 320 Social Work Research

    3 credits

    The ability to interpret and evaluate research methodologies is imperative in the field of social work.  The advancement of rigorous original research on social problems, intervention programs, and policies empowers the field of social work, and an understanding of current research in social work and other related professions allows the social worker to identify and project the needs of individuals, families, groups, and communities for intervention purposes.  This course introduces students to the research process; problem formulation and conceptualization; and such other research topics as measurement; design; inference; practice evaluation; sampling, alternative data gathering techniques; and analysis.  This course also examines the uses of research in social work and ethical issues relevant to the research process. 

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  and Math 102   or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 400 Understanding Mental Health Disorders

    3 credits

    This course offers introductory knowledge regarding mental health and illness for BSW generalist practitioners. This course offers students an opportunity to learn about mental health and illness, particularly in relation to underserved and minority populations. Comprehension of the impact of social and economic stressors on emotional well-being is emphasized and conditions of emotional dysfunction are examined. Mood, anxiety, personality, and disorders of psychosis and dementia are a focus to help prepare generalist practitioners to assist with the mental health needs of individuals, families, and groups.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 405 Social Welfare Policies and Services

    3 credits

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with the orienting knowledge and skills needed to analyze social welfare policies and to understand their application to social service delivery and social work practice.  The course provides a foundational understanding of the major social welfare policies and programs in the United States, while also examining the history of social welfare and its impact on the profession of social work. Analytical frameworks with regard to social welfare policies and services are identified, and strengths and weaknesses of current government interventions are assessed. Emphasis is on social welfare policies and programs designed to alleviate poverty and promote social and economic justice. Attention is also placed on ways in which social workers can advocate for needed policy change.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 410 Professional Behavior and Ethical Decision Making

    3 credits

    This course prepares students for competent and compassionate ethical practice as social work professionals in generalist practice. Students will have the opportunity to acquire and practice the skills of ethical decision-making, including identification of values, the processes and tools of ethical decision-making, value neutrality, confidentiality, client rights, and the limits and dilemmas of the professional relationship. A key focus of the course will be not on “finding the right answers” to ethical questions, but rather helping students discover ethical matters, clearly consider the values impacting their ethical decisions, and how to weigh the competing issues and draw conclusions about how to respond to challenging circumstances based on thoughtful and reasoned reflection.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 450 Pre-Placement Seminar

    3 Credits

    SW 450 is a hybrid course designed to be taken by Social Work Majors in the spring semester of their junior year as an introduction to the Neumann University BSW field placement experience.  Course activities will include the completion of the required field placement preparation documents; drafting, revising, and finalizing resumes and list of references; interview preparation and practice; and pre-placement orientation including general BSW field placement expectations, and Neumann University specific guidelines for administrative, academic, and experiential requirements.  In addition to preparing students for senior year field BSW field placement requirements, students will learn and practice skills which will be useful in their post-graduate graduate school and job search activities.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  or permission of instructor

  
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    SW 460 Field Placement Seminar I

    2 Credits

    The internship is the pinnacle of the social work program at Neumann University. The internship experience is meant to be the culmination of course work, self-reflection and developing perceptions of what it means to be a culturally competent generalist practitioner in the social work field. The primary purpose of the field experience is to integrate social work theory with practice. Students will intern a minimum of 400 hours in the spring semester of senior year at a social service agency under the direct supervision of an approved intern instructor and an assigned faculty liaison from Neumann University’s Department of Human Services. Students will practice generalist  social work skills and apply their knowledge and professional values. Through adherence to the BSW internship manual, students will critique their emerging professional social work practice skills and identity.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  

  
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    SW 461 Field Placement Seminar II

    2 Credits

    SW 461 is a continuation of SW 460  . The internship is the pinnacle of the social work program at Neumann University. The internship experience is meant to be the culmination of course work, self-reflection and developing perceptions of what it means to be a culturally competent generalist practitioner in the social work field. The primary purpose of the field experience is to integrate social work theory with practice. Students will intern a minimum of 400 hours in the spring semester of senior year at a social service agency under the direct supervision of an approved intern instructor and an assigned faculty liaison from Neumann University’s Department of Human Services. Students will practice generalist  social work skills and apply their knowledge and professional values. Through adherence to the BSW internship manual, students will critique their emerging professional social work practice skills and identity.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  

    Writing Intensive Course

  
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    SW 490 Field Placement I

    4 credits

    The internship seminar will provide students with the opportunity to integrate skills learned in their assigned agency setting with content learned throughout the BSW program. Seminar will include a forum for student discussion and feedback from faculty and peers; discussion of case studies from their internships; guest speakers; and assignments relevant to the successful completion of the internship and BSW program. Process recordings will be critiqued in seminar for feedback from peers and faculty, student portfolios and philosophies will be presented; job searches will be supported; and resumes will be prepared and fine-tuned. Students will be able to sharpen their professional skills as culturally competent social work professionals; learn about other agencies; prepare for employment and learn about potential employment opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  

  
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    SW 491 Field Placement II

    5 Credits

    The internship seminar will provide students with the opportunity to integrate skills learned in their assigned agency setting with content learned throughout the BSW program. Seminar will include a forum for student discussion and feedback from faculty and peers; discussion of case studies from their internships; guest speakers; and assignments relevant to the successful completion of the internship and BSW program. Process recordings will be critiqued in seminar for feedback from peers and faculty, student portfolios and philosophies will be presented; job searches will be supported; and resumes will be prepared and fine-tuned. Students will be able to sharpen their professional skills as culturally competent social work professionals; learn about other agencies; prepare for employment and learn about potential employment opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s): SW 100  


Sociology (SOC)

  
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    SOC 101 Principles of Sociology

    3 Credits

    This course provides a generic introduction to sociological methodology, concepts, and processes. Students are introduced to a sociological view of the world which includes concepts of culture, socialization, stratification, complex organizations, criminal justice, small groups, gender, race, and cultural diversity. As a result of this study, the student develops an awareness of social forces that impact his/her own life and perspective on the world.

    Social Science Core Course/ Diversity-certified Course

  
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    SOC 126 Special Topics in Sociology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sociology [SOC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sociology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Sociology course at the 200-level or above, Social Science Core.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    SOC 213 Modern Social Issues

    3 Credits

    Some of the most troublesome issues facing American society today are analyzed in this multidisciplinary course. Society’s attitudes and actions regarding the American Dream as well as issues of inequality, immigration, and violence in society are examined from varying perspectives. Solutions that have previously been attempted to address these problems are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 215 Social Problems

    3 Credits

    What makes a social problem a “problem”? The construction and views of contemporary social problems are examined. Topics for analysis include: racism; sexism; poverty and the welfare system; drug and alcohol abuse; child abuse; domestic violence; inequality; homelessness; the AIDS epidemic; and the role of the state in intervening with these problems.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 220 Deviancy

    3 Credits

    The definitions of deviance and theoretical explanations of deviant behavior in our changing society are explored in this course. Readings and discussions emphasize the structural causes and effects of deviance, the history and development of contemporary perspectives, and the consequences of society’s attempts to punish or change those labeled as deviant. Definitions and responses to crime, mental illness, homosexuality, sexual assault, and deviance among respectable and dominant sectors of society are examined.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 226 Special Topics in Sociology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sociology [SOC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sociology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Sociology course at the 200-level or above, Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 230 Social Change and the Role of Women

    3 Credits

    This cross-cultural study examines how social change is affecting the role of women. Areas which are studied include South Asia, Islamic societies, China, developing nations, and the United States.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 260 Sociology of Marriage and the Family

    3 Credits

    This study of dating, courtship, marital choice, and customs considers alternatives to marriage; conflict and adjustment; as well as crisis and failure in marriage. Parenthood, divorce, remarriage, blended families, and dual-career families are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 325 Sociology of Gender

    3 Credits

    Based upon the premise that human sexuality is not merely a biological phenomenon, this course examines the complex nature of human sexuality as it is expressed in society. Topics include: developing sexuality; sources and consequences of the inequality between males and females; ideology; new advances in reproductive technology; and changing sex roles.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 326 Special Topics in Sociology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sociology [SOC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sociology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Sociology course at the 200-level or above, Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 350 Sociology of Health

    3 Credits

    In this interdisciplinary approach to the study of health and illness in American society, illness is seen as a culturally and socially learned response; and medicine as an institution of social control. Other topics include the medicalization of society; health care in other countries; women and health care; issues in mental health; and health care reform.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 372 Sociology of Education

    3 Credits

    In this examination of the role and functions of schooling in modern society, the school is considered as a formal organization. The relationship between education and social inequality, the school as an agent of social control, as well as innovation and change within an organization are also studied. Students also consider educational alternatives and future change.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 426 Special Topics in Sociology

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sociology [SOC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sociology that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): For any Special Topics Sociology course at the 200-level or above, Social Science Core.

  
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    SOC 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of sociology that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101  (with a minimum grade of C) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Spanish (SP)

  
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    SP 101 Elementary Spanish I

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are introduced to the Spanish language. Through classroom activities that develop their oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities, students learn about the basic structure of Spanish grammar and writing as well as become familiar with elementary conversational skills. Spanish and Hispanic culture and social traditions are also presented and discussed as part of the students’ introduction to the Spanish language.

    Placement Note: This course is intended for students who are truly beginning study of Spanish as a foreign language and who have one year of Spanish at the high school level or less, including students who have not taken Spanish since elementary or middle school. Students with more than one year of high school Spanish should be placed in SP 102 (2 years) or SP 201 (3 or more years).

  
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    SP 102 Elementary Spanish II

    3 Credits

    With an increased emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation, this course offers a review of basic grammar and introduces the student to additional linguistic features. There is a continued focus on Spanish and Hispanic historical and cultural achievements, with an introduction to the Spanish-speaking world.

    Placement Note: This course is intended for those students who have two years of high school Spanish with a limited background in the language. If a student is hesitant, but meets this criterion, the student should still be enrolled in SP 102.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 101  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

    Modern Language Core Course

  
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    SP 126 Special Topics in Spanish

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Spanish [SP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Spanish that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  for any Spanish Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    SP 201 Intermediate Spanish

    I3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with an intermediate level of training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. Students review their knowledge of Spanish grammar before they are introduced to more advanced grammatical concepts and comprehension skills. In addition, students expand their knowledge of linguistic features through readings of classical and modern writing, film, and other texts as well as through the further development of their abilities to conduct and maintain conversations in Spanish.

    Placement Note: This course is intended for those students who have three or more years of high school Spanish. If a student is hesitant, but meets this criterion, the student should still be enrolled in SP 201.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 102  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    SP 202 Intermediate Spanish II

    3 Credits

    The four language skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing are further enhanced through the introduction of more advanced grammatical concepts, expanded vocabulary acquisition and rigorous speaking and listening exercises. Students also continue to develop their conversational and comprehension skills through cultural activities.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  with a minimum grade of “C” OR permission of instructor. All students are encouraged to consult the information on Foreign Language Core Course Placement.

  
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    SP 226 Special Topics in Spanish

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Spanish [SP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Spanish that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  for any Spanish Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    SP 301 Business Spanish

    3 Credits

    By focusing on linguistic and cultural competence in the Spanish business milieu, students “form a company” in the Spanish language/culture, develop an organizational chart, design an ad campaign (which includes broadcast media as well as print), and maintain appropriate correspondence during a variety of scenarios. Vocabulary necessary to economic and marketing success are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 202 .

  
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    SP 302 Spanish for the Health Professions

    3 Credits

    This advanced language study focuses on the vocabulary, idioms, and structures which are useful to health professionals whose clients speak Spanish. Both technical terms and expressions to convey support and understanding are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 202 .

  
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    SP 310 Survey of Hispanic Literature

    3 Credits

    Literary masterpieces written in the Spanish language are examined within a historical perspective. Frequent compositions and discussions in Spanish develop the student’s linguistic ability and provide an introduction to literary analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 202 .

  
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    SP 320 Spanish Civilization

    3 Credits

    This advanced language study course focuses on the history, culture, geography, and customs of those people who speak the Spanish language. Frequent practice in conversation and composition is included.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 202 .

  
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    SP 325 La Espana Global

    3 Credits

    This course offers an opportunity to study Spain’s origin and history, her diverse cultures, her civilization and the literature that contributed to her renown among European nations. Historical considerations will provide basis for considerations of the modern day realities of Spain, such as her politics, literature, cuisine and art. The course will include readings, discussion and related activities.

  
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    SP 326 Special Topics in Spanish

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Spanish [SP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Spanish that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  for any Spanish Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    SP 330 Advanced Conversation and Grammar I

    3 Credits

    This course builds on the skills learned and practiced in SP 201  and SP 202 . This plan of study is designed to help students develop in conversational fluency by strengthening knowledge and application of Spanish grammar through seven special communicative goals. This course is essential for students pursuing a minor in Spanish and for those students who determine to improve their conversational ability. The course includes readings and conversations centered on cultural aspects of the Hispanic world.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  or otherwise determined by Professor.

  
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    SP 331 Advanced Conversation and Grammar II

    3 Credits

    This course builds on the skills learned and practiced in SP 330 . This plan of study is designed to continue to help students develop in conversational fluency by strengthening knowledge and application of Spanish grammar through seven special communicative goals. You will gain confidence in your ability to describe people, places and things, narrate in the past, react and recommend, talk about likes and dislikes and opinions, hypothesize and talk about the future. The course includes readings and conversations centered on cultural aspects of the Hispanic world.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  or otherwise determined by Professor.

  
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    SP 340 Iberoamerica

    3 Credits

    A detailed consideration of the Americas influenced by the Spanish exploration by study and reflection on the diverse cultures, histories, civilizations and literatures that contribute to the formation of the unique Ibero-American countries.

  
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    SP 426 Special Topics in Spanish

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Spanish [SP] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Spanish that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  for any Spanish Special Topics course at the 200-level or above.

  
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    SP 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of Spanish that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. As a minimum requirement for this project, the student is expected to submit a substantial essay indicating extensive learning and competence in Spanish. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): SP 201  and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Sport and Entertainment Management (SEM)

  
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    SEM 126 Special Topics in Sport and Entertainment Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management [SEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    SEM 201 Introduction to Sport and Entertainment Management

    3 Credits

    This introductory course acquaints students with the history of sport and entertainment which has led to the need for trained sport and entertainment management professionals. The course also provides students with an overview of the settings and opportunities within the vast and diverse industry. Course content includes management responsibilities, effective leadership, strategic planning, organizational skills, and various governance bodies in the sport and entertainment industry.

  
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    SEM 221 Facilities and Event Management

    3 Credits

    In this course, management issues are addressed that apply to both sport and recreation facilities. Topics of study include planning, design and construction, operations, as well as risk management and maintenance of such facilities. The close relationship between facilities and event management are also examined through a study of such content areas as scheduling, marketing, human resource management, and legal issues.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201   (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 226 Special Topics in Sport and Entertainment Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management [SEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  and SEM 221  or permission of the instructor.

  
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    SEM 245 Media Relations in Sport and Entertainment

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the role of public relations in the marketing mix and develop those public relation skills which are needed for effective interpersonal and mass communication. The student becomes acquainted with the mass media industry, including print and electronic media. Communication skills which are necessary for working with small groups and for communicating with the media are also addressed.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 260 Club and Resort Management

    3 Credits

    This course familiarizes the student with the programs and equipment as well as the organizational and management skills that are necessary to plan and manage a quality fitness/rehabilitation facility. Additionally, students acquire transferable skills that can then be utilized in any sport club setting.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  (with a minimum grade of C).

    Foreign Language Core Course

  
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    SEM 270 Principles of Coaching

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are provided with opportunities to acquire the basic knowledge that is necessary to coach organized sports programs. Attention is devoted to both the needs of the athlete and the role and responsibilities of the coach. This course is open as a General Elective for all students, and can be utilized as a Sport Management Elective for Sport Management majors.

  
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    SEM 300 Sport and Entertainment Finance

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the fundamentals of finance as it relates to the sport and entertainment industry, students are introduced to financial statement analysis, the time/value of money, investments, the player’s contract, fundraising, and the development of organizational budgets.

    Prerequisite(s): ACT 104  and SEM 201  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 305 Administration of Athletics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing careers in athletic administration. Areas of study include administrative issues such as budgeting; liability; organizational techniques; legal and ethical issues; purchasing; scheduling; as well as personnel and student-athlete issues. Students also learn administrative responsibilities which are associated with yearly, seasonal, and/or daily event operations.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 200  and SEM 221  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 325 Live Entertainment

    3 Credits

    Live Entertainment is a primary component of entertainment industry. In this course, students examine the planning, design, operations, as well as risk management issues that are involved in presenting a live entertainment event. Other areas of study include scheduling, marketing, financial issues, as well as human resource management.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 326 Special Topics in Sport and Entertainment Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management [SEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
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    SEM 345 Sociological Issues In Sport

    3 Credits

    Students examine the relationship and contributions of competitive and recreational sports to the social and cultural aspects of society. The student also studies the effects of sport on behavior and examines trends and issues in the sport industry today.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SEM 420 Sport and Entertainment Marketing and Promotions

    3 Credits

    This course explores the marketing process relative to sport and entertainment in collegiate, recreational, commercial, and professional environments. Included in this study are market research techniques, pricing, promotional developments and strategies, identifying target markets, and advertising.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 200  and SEM 245  (both with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    SEM 426 Special Topics in Sport and Entertainment Management

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management [SEM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport and Entertainment Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    SEM 460 Sport and Entertainment Management Seminar

    3 Credits

    This upper-level seminar is designed to investigate the total environment of sport and entertainment management as viewed by top managers in the field. Concepts developed in other Business and Sport and Entertainment Management courses are implemented in strategic planning and problem solving through the utilization of realistic scenarios. When appropriate, actual issues currently being addressed at an organization or institution are analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior-level status in the major. This course should be taken during the student’s final semester prior to graduation.

    Service Learning Course

  
  •  

    SEM 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of sport and entertainment management that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): SEM 201  (with a minimum grade of C) and Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Sport Management (SM)

  
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    SM 101 Introduction to Sport Management

    3 Credits

    This introductory course acquaints students with the history of sport and entertainment which has led to the need for trained sport and entertainment management professionals. The course also provides students with an overview of the settings and opportunities within the vast and diverse industry. Course content includes management responsibilities, effective leadership, strategic planning, organizational skills, and various governance bodies in the sport and entertainment industry.

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    SM 126 Special Topcis: Sport Management

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Management [SM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    SM 221 Facilities/Event Management

    3 Credits

    In this course, management issues are addressed that apply to both sport and recreation facilities. Topics of study include planning, design and construction, operations, as well as risk management and maintenance of such facilities. The close relationship between facilities and event management are also examined through a study of such content areas as scheduling, marketing, human resource management, and legal issues.

    Prerequisite(s): SM 101  (minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    SM 226 Special Topics: Sport Management

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Management [SM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): SM 101  or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    SM 227 Sport Sales

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of sales and promotion management in the context of the sport industry.  It will examine both the academic understanding of sales management as well as real world techniques, strategies, and issues that play out in organizations, arenas, and facilities around the world.  Areas addressed are ticketing and promotion management, the impact of social and digital media, sponsorships, corporate partnerships, and ethics as a pathway into a career in sport management.

  
  •  

    SM 305 Sport Policy, Governance and Legal Issues

    3 Credits

    This course examines governance and policy development in sport management. Topics include managerial activities related to sport governance, strategic management, ethics in sport, and governance and policy development in specific sport contacts.  Legal issues related to the sport industry are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): MGT 100  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
  •  

    SM 326 Special Topics: Sport Management

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Management [SM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): SM 101  or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    SM 345 Sport Finance and Economics Issues

    3 Credits

    This course examines finance and economic issues as they relate to the sport industry.  Students are introduced to financial statement analysis, the time/value of money, investments, athletic contracts, fundraising, and the development of sport organization budgets and forecasts.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    SM 390 Digital Media, Communications and PR in Sport

    3 Credits

    Digital and social media have evolved to touch almost every business line in the business of sports. The platforms, strategies, and tactics behind the efforts in digital media span across marketing, public relations, communications and sales. The required understanding of the core aspects of digital media allows synthetization of audience and goal identification, tying it to strategy and tactics with measurable goals and outcomes. Weekly discussions and reflections will introduce case studies, podcasts, and articles. The culmination of the learned elements will be shown through class-based projects centered on running social media for an event, team, organization, or brand and developing a uniquely creative campaign.

  
  •  

    SM 420 Sport Marketing and Promotions

    3 Credits

    This course explores the marketing process relative to sport management in collegiate, recreational, commercial, and professional environments. Included in this study are market research techniques, pricing, promotional developments and strategies, identifying target markets, and advertising.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 100  (with a minimum grade of C) and Junior Status (minimum 60 credits earned).

    Writing Intensive Course

  
  •  

    SM 426 Special Topics: Sport Management

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Sport and Management [SM] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Sport Management that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s): SM 101  or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    SM 460 Sport Management Seminar

    3 Credits

    This upper-level seminar is designed to investigate the total environment of sport and entertainment management as viewed by top managers in the field. Concepts developed in other Business and Sport and Entertainment Management courses are implemented in strategic planning and problem solving through the utilization of realistic scenarios. When appropriate, actual issues currently being addressed at an organization or institution are analyzed.

  
  •  

    SM 480 Independent Study Project

    3 Credits

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of sport and entertainment management that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): SM 101  (with a minimum grade of C).


Theater (THEA)

  
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    THEA 103 Introduction to the Theater

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the art and craft of the theater, this course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the work of playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. Students also study the technical and management functions of play production. Course work includes attendance at live stage productions and participation in the development and production of a scene for an in-class performance.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    THEA 126 Special Topics in Theater

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theater [THEA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Theater that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course

  
  •  

    THEA 226 Special Topics in Theater

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theater [THEA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Theater that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course

  
  •  

    THEA 240 Fundamentals of Acting

    3 Credits

    This course serves both as an introduction to the basic craft and art of acting as well as a survey of the practice of acting in different historical periods. The student learns physical and vocal preparation; develops diction and projection skills; and explores the use of improvisation as a tool in both actor training and rehearsal. For in-class presentation, the student memorizes, rehearses, and presents both short solo pieces and scene work in conjunction with a partner. Audition techniques are also covered.

    Fine Arts Core Course

  
  •  

    THEA 250 Theater Production: Stage Performance

    3 Credits

    In this course, the student is responsible for portraying one or more characters in a play, and integrating his/her work into an ensemble performance. Course work varies according to the production, but includes analyzing and understanding the character played; rehearsing; memorizing lines; business; blocking; and performing. Duties may also involve singing, dancing, playing a musical instrument, stage fighting, acrobatics, etc.

    Registration for this course is contingent upon a successful audition with the stage director(s).
  
  •  

    THEA 260 Theater Production: Stage Crew

    3 Credits

    Students become part of the construction or running crew of a theater production. Course work varies according to the actual production and may include such content areas as: operation of lighting or sound equipment during performances; construction and painting of scenery; the hanging and circuiting of lighting instruments; and the care and maintenance of costumes. Throughout the course, the student learns various aspects of technical theater, including the principles of maintaining a clean and safe work environment and how to integrate his/her work into a complex operation.

  
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    THEA 270 Theater Production: Marketing Staff

    3 Credits

    In this course, the student becomes part of the marketing team for a theater production and learns the skills involved in copywriting, soliciting advertisements for inclusion in a program book, ushering, telemarketing, and mailings. The student also learns the fundamentals of audience and client relations; effective representation of a performing arts organization; and the fundamentals of direct marketing.

  
  •  

    THEA 326 Special Topics in Theater

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theater [THEA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Theater that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course

  
  •  

    THEA 340 Intermediate Acting

    3 Credits

    This course takes the tools provided in THEA 240 , Fundamentals of Acting, and builds upon them. By beginning to focus on applying the creative process to written dramatic texts, students learn basic scene study and rehearsal techniques, applying these both to their own small scene work as well as to the projects of THEA 240  students. Together, they further continue to hone their craft by observing and helping to instruct THEA 240  students in their work.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 240 .

  
  •  

    THEA 345 Advanced Realism

    3 Credits

    In this course, students independently study traditional Realistic acting theory (Stanislavski) as well as work on two large scenes with a partner. The techniques learned in THEA 240 , Fundamentals of Acting, as well as new material gleaned from assigned readings, are used to guide their work in developing rich, nuanced presentations which may be used as examples in THEA 240  lectures.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 340 .

  
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    THEA 350 Theater Production: Stage Management

    3 Credits

    In this course, the student becomes the stage manager for a theater production. Responsibilities include staffing rehearsals; assembly of a prompt book; careful notation of blocking and business; entry of sound, light, and multimedia cues; management of actors; integration of technical elements into performance; maintenance of order at rehearsals; purchasing rehearsal supplies; maintaining accurate records of expenditures and attendance; and calling all cues during technical as well as dress rehearsals and performances.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 250  or THEA 260 ; Pre- or corequisite: THEA 103 .

  
  •  

    THEA 355 Theater Production: Dramaturgy

    3 Credits

    The student serves as a dramaturg for a theater production in this course. He/she conducts historical and production research on the play being produced and communicates relevant information to the director, the designers, and the audience. The student develops a thorough understanding of the play and the production concept through study and through consultation with the director. He/she is required to research the history of the time in which the play is set and the production history of the play as well as provide useful materials to the director, the designers, and the house manager. The student also writes explanatory essays for publication in the program book, identifies expenses related to his/her research, and develops a budget to meet those needs.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core and THEA 103 .

  
  •  

    THEA 360 Theater Production: Crew Management

    3 Credits

    This course allows the student the opportunity to supervise a technical crew in a theater production. Technical crews are typically involved in properties, construction, electrics, and running. Responsibilities include scheduling and staffing work sessions, providing instruction, interpreting plans and instructions, purchasing materials, and maintaining accurate records of expenditures and attendance.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 260 ; Pre- or corequisite: THEA 103 .

  
  •  

    THEA 365 Theater Production: Design

    3 Credits

    The student enrolled in this course is responsible for one of the design areas in a theater production: set and properties, costumes, make-up, lighting, sound, or multimedia. Duties include understanding the design needs of the production through a study of the script; consultation with the director, the dramaturg, and other designers; and observation of rehearsals. The student also develops and proposes a budget to allow for the execution of the design, and drafts plans and documents for the design’s completion. He/she supervises the construction and/or installation of the design and maintains the design’s integrity throughout the production.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 103  and 100-level ART requirements for the major.

    Registration is contingent upon the instructor’s review of the student’s design portfolio as well as an interview with and approval by the instructor.
  
  •  

    THEA 370 Theater Production: Marketing Management

    3 Credits

    The student supervises several areas of responsibility which are assigned to the marketing crew for a theater production. Opportunities for such supervisory experiences include (1) house management, which involves training and scheduling the ushers, maintaining a pleasant environment for the audience, and designing a lobby display; (2) box office management, which focuses on training and scheduling the box office staff, managing the reservation system, and accounting for box office receipts; and, (3) advertisement sales management, which involves the training and management of a sales staff, maintaining sales records, and accounting for advertising sales receipts. The purchase of materials and maintenance of accurate records of expenditures and attendance are also part of the student’s supervisory experiences in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 270 ; Pre- or corequisite: THEA 103 .

  
  •  

    THEA 375 Theater Production: Publications

    3 Credits

    This course provides opportunities for the student to serve on the marketing team for a theater production and to create images that are used for promotional and archival purposes. Duties vary according to the production, but may include (1) photography, involving formal head shots of the artists, candid rehearsal and production shots, and performance-quality shots of the dress rehearsal; (2) desktop publishing, which focuses on the production of flyers, posters, tickets, a T-shirt template, and the program book, as well as serving as production liaison with the printer; and (3) graphic design, which incorporates the design of the production logo and other graphical materials that may be needed for the production, including images which are integrated into the performance. The student also learns to identify expenses related to his/her publications work and to develop a budget to meet these needs.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 103  and other courses as determined by the instructor according to specific production needs; ART 295  for photography; ART 220  or ART 280  for graphic design; CA 270  for desktop publishing.

    Registration is contingent upon the instructor’s review of the student’s design portfolio as well as an interview with and approval by the instructor.
  
  •  

    THEA 426 Special Topics in Theater

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Theater [THEA] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Theater that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course

  
  •  

    THEA 440 Solo Performance

    3 Credits

    This course enables each student to begin exploring the art of acting outside of Realism. Existing texts or original works may be used to help the student as he/she meets the challenges which are inherent in working without a partner. Elements outside of strict Realism, such as imagery and tone color of language, stylized movements, multiple characterization, and symbolism are also studied.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 340 .

  
  •  

    THEA 450 Theater Production: Stage Direction

    3 Credits

    In this course, the student directs a fully produced play, usually a one-act. Duties vary according to the production, but include such areas as text analysis; performer auditions; building a rehearsal schedule; determining blocking and business; and supervising designs. The student also develops and administers a budget for the production.

    Prerequisite(s): English Literature Core, THEA 103 , THEA 240 , and THEA 350 . Registration is contingent upon an interview with and approval by the instructor and on the season’s production schedule.

  
  •  

    THEA 460 Theater Production: Technical Direction

    3 Credits

    The student serves as the technical director (TD) for a theater production in this course. He/she is responsible for ensuring that all technical components of the play are made to designer specifications, are ready on deadline, and are executed properly in performance. Duties vary according to the production, but usually include developing a calendar of technical deadlines; scheduling, staffing, and supervising of work sessions; developing and supervising the budget for each design area; maintaining safe, clean, and functional environments for work sessions, rehearsals, and performances; construction of set pieces and specialized properties; supervising and troubleshooting the technical rehearsal; and supervising the strike.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 103  and THEA 360 .

    Registration is contingent upon an interview with and approval by the instructor.
  
  •  

    THEA 470 Theater Production: Marketing Direction

    3 Credits

    This course allows the student to serve as the marketing director for a theater production. As such, the student is responsible for generating an audience for the production and ensuring that the audience is given what it needs to enjoy and appreciate the performance. Duties include developing a marketing strategy and a calendar of marketing deadlines; coordinating the marketing managers; supervising all marketing efforts; developing and supervising the marketing budget; coordinating with Neumann University’s marketing staff; and placing advertisements in a variety of media.

    Prerequisite(s): THEA 103  and THEA 370 .

    Registration is contingent upon an interview with and approval by the instructor.
  
  •  

    THEA 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of theater that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and/or performance requirements under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Theology (THEO)

  
  •  

    THEO 104 Theological Foundations

    3 Credits

    This course presents a foundation in Theology by introducing students to Scripture and the basic tenets of the Christian faith. Personal introspection on how spirituality can and does play a role in students’ lives is encouraged by placing an emphasis on critical thinking, theological reflection, and the centrality of community. Through the lens of the Franciscan tradition and Scripture, core Christian themes are examined, including images of God, creation, Christology, social justice, the Reign of God, as well as sacraments and the Church.  This course must be taken in either the first or second semester of the student’s first year at Neumann University.   

  
  •  

    THEO 201 Sacramental Theology and Pastoral Practice

    3 Credits

    Through a focus of meeting Christ in the life and worship of the Church, this course traces the development of the sacraments and their influences on the individual and the Christian community. The pastoral practices of this course highlight the importance of developing, supporting, and encouraging young adult faith formation. Students create new pastoral and educational approaches for the building up of God’s Kingdom. These pastoral and educational experiences assist students in the translation of their theological reflection and knowledge into a lived faith response that both fosters a greater understanding of their own identity and faith development and encourages outreach as a manifestation of that faith.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 202 Sexual and Medical Ethics in Christian Perspective

    3 Credits

    Students examine the history and development of Christian ethical decision-making in such areas as responsibility for health care; sexuality and reproduction; reconstructing human beings; and death and dying.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 203 Contemporary Christian Spirituality

    3 Credits

    By studying how to discover and develop one’s personal relationship to God and how to live this relationship in everyday work as well as family and social life, students explore such topics as religious development; prayer; struggle and suffering; body and feeling; action; and contemplation.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 204 Christian Marriage and Relationships

    3 Credits

    Through a study that is both historical and interdisciplinary, this course is designed to familiarize the student with the theological and psycho-social foundations of the sacrament of Christian marriage. Students are challenged to examine the interrelation of friendships, human sexuality, marriage, and one’s family origin, particularly with regard to such complex issues as pre- and extra-marital sexual relations, procreation, divorce and remarriage, abuse, and sexual orientation.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

  
  •  

    THEO 208 Catholic Social and Moral Teaching

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to the impact that Franciscan thought, values, and scholarship have had on the richness of twentieth-century Catholic thought regarding such diverse social issues as just-war theory, economic justice for all, women’s issues, environmental ethics, race relations, and health care reform.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.  

  
  •  

    THEO 210 Francis of Assisi: A Man of Universal Appeal

    3 Credits

    The life and times of Francis of Assisi are introduced in this course. Through a study of Francis’ writings and his early biographies, students gain insight into his charisma and the impact and appeal which Francis has had for the people of his own century and for those of all subsequent centuries.

    Prerequisite(s): THEO 104  and PHIL 102  and a minimum of 60 earned credits.  

 

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