Oct 06, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


The courses listed below and described in this section of the catalog constitute the curriculum of Neumann University. Each course description is preceded by a content area abbreviation and numeric designation, e.g., ENG 103 , along with the course title and the number of credits assigned for the course. Specific enrollment directives, e.g., prerequisites, corequisites, or special permissions, apply to students of all levels and programs.

Only those courses which are numbered at the 100 level or above are applicable toward a degree at Neumann University. Uniform numbers are used for additional experiences which are available in major discipline areas. These courses or experiences are provided for individuals or groups of students as deemed appropriate. For the most part, all Core courses are assigned in the 100 and 200 levels. Exceptions to these Core numeric designations are determined by the appropriate Division Dean. Special topics in specific disciplines are listed under the numbers 126/226/326/426. Independent Study Projects (ISPs) are listed as 480; major seminars as 460; Internships experiences use numbers from 394–396 and 494–496.

Practica/Rotations are supervised practice-setting learning experiences which are an intrinsic part of a student’s major program of study, i.e., required for satisfactory completion of the course and academic program.

The School Deans of Neumann University have established minimum and maximum class sizes for each course offered in any given semester. Neumann University reserves the right to cancel or postpone any course or related activity because of insufficient enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances. For availability of courses, refer to either the Neumann University web site (www.neumann.edu) or contact the Office of the Registrar.

NOTE: Unless otherwise stipulated, courses with an LS [Liberal Studies], OS [Organizational Studies], PA [Public Safety Administration] designations are open ONLY to those non-traditional students who are pursuing one of the accelerated degrees offered by the Adult and Continuing Education Department (ACE).

 

Nursing: Major Courses (NUR)

  
  •  

    NUR 205 Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Practice

    3 Credits

    This course introduces concepts, values, skills, and behaviors that provide the foundation of professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical thinking skills and strategies that support the development of clinical reasoning.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 106 /BIO 116 , BIO 130 / BIO 135 BIO 131 /BIO 136 , CHEM 101 /CHEM 111 , ENG 102 , PSYCH 101 , and SOC 101 .

  
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    NUR 206 Health Assessment and Modalities

    2 Credits

    This first course in the nursing major focuses on development of the knowledge base essential for gathering, analyzing, and documenting assessed patient data and in performance of select fundamental nursing skills.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 205  

    NOTE:   NUR 206 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 216 .
  
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    NUR 216 Health Assessment and Modalities Lab

    1 Credit

    This course is the laboratory practicum for NUR 206 Health Assessement and Modalities . Within the laboratory environment, students develop skills required for beginning clinical practice.  Basic techniques necessary for gathering, analyzing, and documenting assessed patient data are emphasized. Students practice and perform basic nursing skills required for patient care.  This course includes 28 laboratory hours. 

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 205  

    Note:  NUR 216 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 206 .
  
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    NUR 305 Adult Health Nursing I

    2 Credits

    This Junior level course examines the holistic care of adults and older adults with chronic illness. Students begin to analyze evidence-based principles in the delivery of health promotion, injury prevention, and management of illness across the adult life span. Patient safety and quality of care are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 206  and NUR 216  

    NOTE: NUR 305 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 305CL .
  
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    NUR 305CL Adult Health I Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Junior-level clinical practicum course applies the nursing process in the holistic care of adult and older adult patients with chronic illness. Students begin to demonstrate clinical reasoning in the delivery of safe, effective nursing care. Beginning leadership skills to promote quality nursing care are practiced through communication, advocacy, and collaboration with members of the health care team. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 206  and NUR 216  

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE:  NUR 305CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 305 .
  
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    NUR 306 Adult Health Nursing II

    2 Credits

    This Junior-level course builds on previous learning that applies the nursing process to the holistic, compassionate care of adults across the life span. Students examine common acute and chronic conditions affecting adults and older adults. Evidence-based principles and beginning skills in clinical reasoning are addressed when examining health promotion, injury prevention, and management of illness. Issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice are explored. 

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 305 , NUR 305CL  , NUR 330  and NUR 330CL .

    NOTE:  NUR 306 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 306CL .
  
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    NUR 306CL Adult Health II Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Junior level clinical practicum course integrates the nursing process in the holistic care of adult patients with acute and chronic health problems. Students employ clinical reasoning in the delivery of safe and effective nursing care. Emphasis is placed on the practice and refinement of more advanced clinical and organizational abilities through psychomotor skills performance, simulation, and direct patient care. Communication, collaboration, coordination, and consultation are emphasized in caring for individuals and families. Personal responsibility and conduct consistent with the ANA Code of Ethics and University core values are stressed. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 305  , NUR 305CL  , NUR 330  and NUR 330CL  

    NOTE: NUR 306CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 306  .
  
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    NUR 330 Mental Health Nursing

    2 Credits

    This Junior level course applies the nursing process in the holistic care of individuals with mental health problems and psychiatric disorders. Students reflect on their own behavior and methods of therapeutic communication. Legal and ethical issues unique to mental health care are discussed. Principles related to advocacy, collaboration and evidence-based practice are examined as they apply to the delivery of safe and effective nursing care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 206  and NUR 216  

     

    NOTE:  NUR 330 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 330CL .

  
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    NUR 330CL Mental Health Nursing Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Junior level clinical practicum course applies the nursing process to the holistic care of individuals with acute and chronic mental illness. Students reflect on their own behavior and methods of therapeutic communication. Students begin to demonstrate clinical reasoning and ethical practice in the delivery of safe and effective nursing care to patients. Students begin to apply principles of advocacy, collaboration and evidence-based nursing practice during laboratory simulation and clinical experiences. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 206  and NUR 216  

    NOTE:  NUR 330CL is to be taken in conjunction with NUR 330 .
  
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    NUR 335 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology I

    3 Credits

    This junior level course introduces basic pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts applied to patient care. Conditions associated with inflammation and infection, as well as selected illness states are studied. Pharmacologic treatment for identified conditions and illnesses, and related patient rights and nursing responsibilities are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 106 /BIO 116 , BIO 130 /BIO 131 , BIO 135 /BIO 136 , CHEM 101 /CHEM 111  and NUR 206 .


  
  •  

    NUR 336 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology II

    3 Credits

    This junior level course introduces basic pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts applied to patient care. Conditions associated with selected illnesses are studied. Pharmacologic treatments for identified illness states are studied. Related patient rights and nursing responsibilities are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 335 .

  
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    NUR 340 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family

    2 Credits

    This Junior-level course builds on previous learning that applies the nursing process in the holistic, compassionate care of the childbearing family. Evidence-based principles and beginning skills in clinical reasoning are addressed when examining health promotion of the childbearing family from pre-conception through the post-partum period. Common complications of pregnancy, labor, birth, postpartum, and the neonate are analyzed. Legal, ethical, and social justice issues unique to maternal-newborn nursing are discussed. Principles related to advocacy, collaboration, and quality improvement are examined as they apply to the delivery of safe and effective nursing care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 305 , NUR 305CL , NUR 330  and NUR 330CL  

    NOTE:  NUR 340 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 340CL .
  
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    NUR 340CL Childbearing Family Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Junior level clinical practicum course enables students to apply the nursing process to the care of the new mother, neonate, and the family. Students apply principles of advocacy, therapeutic communication, collaboration, coordination, and patient education as they provide care. Students demonstrate critical thinking as they address quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and individualized needs of the childbearing family in the community through a series of clinical activities and exemplars. Students engage in self-evaluation to determine strengths and areas of personal improvement. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 305 , NUR 305CL , NUR 330 , and NUR 330CL  

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE: NUR 330CL must be takin in conjunction with NUR 340 .
  
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    NUR 360 Nursing Research

    3 Credits

    This Junior-level course enables students to examine current clinical practice through critical analysis of research literature. Qualitative and quantitative research processes are examined. The ethics of research is included.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 , NUR 305 , NUR 305CL , NUR 330 ,NUR 330CL  or equivalents.

  
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    NUR 405 Adult Health Nursing III

    2 Credits

    This Senior level course applies the nursing process to holistic care of adults and older adults. Students are introduced to concepts needed to provide safe effective nursing care to acutely ill individuals with complex health problems. Evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning skills are addressed when examining health promotion, injury prevention, and management of illness.

    Prerequisite(s): ALL 300 level required nursing courses.

    NOTE:  NUR 405 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 405CL .
  
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    NUR 405CL Adult Health III Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Senior level clinical practicum course provides students with the opportunity to administer holistic, compassionate nursing care to adults and older adults with complex health care needs.  Students demonstrate integration of evidence-based knowledge and clinical reasoning in the development and implementation of comprehensive plans of care.  Students incorporate principles of advocacy, communication, collaboration, and coordination to meet complex needs of patients and their families.  Integration of the ANA Code of Ethics and Neumann University Core Values are emphasized. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): ALL 300 level required nursing courses.

    NOTE:  NUR 405CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 405 .
  
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    NUR 410 Issues in Professional Nursing

    3 Credits

    This Senior-level course explores issues in health care delivery, health policy, and other forces shaping nursing practice. Legal, ethical, historical, and socioeconomic influences on client care are examined. Students analyze issues related to advocacy, health disparities, and continuity of care. Collaboration and coordination with members of the interdisciplinary health care team are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): ALL 300 level required nursing courses.

  
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    NUR 430 Nursing of Children and Families

    2 Credits

    This Senior level course applies the nursing process to holistic, compassionate care of infants, children, adolescents and their families. Students are introduced to concepts needed to provide safe, effective nursing care to pediatric patients with acute, chronic, and /or complex health problems. Issues unique to care of children and their families are analyzed with emphasis on growth and development. Evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning skills are addressed when examining health promotion, injury prevention, and management of illness. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Laboratory/Clinical Requirement(s): (This course includes 14 laboratory and 63 clinical hours.)

    Prerequisite(s): ALL 300 level required nursing courses. 

    NOTE:  NUR 430 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 430CL .
  
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    NUR 430CL Nursing of Children and Families Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Senior-level clinical experience applies the nursing practice to the care of children and their families to a number of actual and modeled situations. Principles of pediatric growth and development are applied to the management of acute and chronic illnesses encountered by children from infancy through adolescence. Students analyze and apply the principles of advocacy, collaboration, coordination, and evidence-based practice to meet complex needs of children and families in clinical practice, case study and critical thinking exercises. Integration of the Nursing Code of Ethics and Neumann University Core Values are emphasized. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): ALL 300 level required nursing courses.

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE:  NUR 430 CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 430  .
  
  •  

    NUR 440 Community Health Nursing

    2 Credits

    This Senior level course facilitates synthesis of theoretical concepts and principles needed for professional nursing practice in community settings. Emphasis is placed on delivery of primary, secondary, and tertiary health services for individuals, families, and aggregates with sensitivity to diversity, economics, sociocultural, and environmental influences encountered in the community. Students explore determinants of health, with emphasis on health promotion and disease and/or injury prevention. Implications of health care policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice are examined. Opportunities are provided to evaluate various population-based approaches to practice.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 405 , NUR 405CL , NUR 410 , NUR 430  and NUR 430CL  

    Service Learning Course

    NOTE:  NUR 440 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 440CL .
  
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    NUR 440CL Community Health Nursing Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    This Senior level course facilitates synthesis of theoretical concepts and principles needed for professional nursing practice in community settings. Emphasis is placed on delivery of primary, secondary, and tertiary health services for individuals, families, and aggregates with sensitivity to diversity, economics, sociocultural, and environmental influences encountered in the community. Students explore determinants of health, with emphasis on health promotion and disease and/or injury prevention. Implications of health care policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice are examined. Opportunities are provided to evaluate various population-based approaches to practice. This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, smimulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 405 , NUR 405CL , NUR 410 , NUR 430   and NUR 430CL  

    Writing Intensive Course

    NOTE:  NUR 440CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 440 .
  
  •  

    NUR 499 Nursing Synthesis

    2 Credits

    This course facilitates synthesis of theoretical concepts and evidence-based practice principles needed for entry-level professional nursing practice. Leadership and management strategies are explored. Case studies and concepts associated with practice are analyzed.  Case management and ethical decision making are emphasized. Standardized, comprehensive examinations are integrated and serve to assist the students in identification of personal strengths and areas for professional growth. Students develop and implement selected strategies to address identified needs.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 405 , NUR 405CL , NUR 410  , NUR 430  and NUR 430CL .

     NOTE:  NUR 499 must be taken in conjunction with NUR 499CL  .
  
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    NUR 499CL Nursing Synthesis Clinical Practicum

    2 Credits

    In this clinical practicum course, students apply the nursing process to provide comprehensive, holistic, compassionate care to groups of patients in acute care, medical-surgical settings. Clinical reasoning is integrated to inform delivery of safe, effective nursing care for individuals and families across the health care continuum. Students integrate leadership strategies to foster communication, collaboration, coordination, and consultation among interdisciplinary health team members. Demonstration of personal responsibility and integration of the Nursing Code of Ethics and Neumann University Core Values are emphasized.  This course includes 84 hours of nursing skills, simulations, and direct patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 405 , NUR 405CL , NUR 410 , NUR 430  and NUR 430CL  

    NOTE:  NUR 499CL must be taken in conjunction with NUR 499 .

Nursing: Elective Courses (NUR)

  
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    NUR 126 Special Topics in Nursing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Nursing [NUR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Nursing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Dean may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Permission of the Dean may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    NUR 226 Special Topics in Nursing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Nursing [NUR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Nursing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Dean may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    NUR 308 Nursing and Spirituality

    3 Credits

    This course explores the spiritual dimension of human nature. Students differentiate spirituality from religious practices and develop awareness of the spiritual dimension present in all people. Cultural aspects of spirituality are explored. Students examine their personal spiritual dimensions, and reflect on how the nurse-patient relationship may be enhanced through spiritual care. Contemporary issues influencing spirituality will be discussed. Spiritual needs associated with chronic illness, disability, and serious illness in children and their families, dying, loss and grieving will be discussed. Through reflection and service, students enhance their ability to connect with and be present to others. Students also consider the healing aspects of nature and beauty as part of their personal spiritual care.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least two 300 level clinical nursing courses, or licensure as an LPN or RN> 

    Open to Nursing majors, RNs, and LPNs.
  
  •  

    NUR 319 The Practice of Self-Care

    3 Credits

    Neumann nursing faculty strongly believe that students cannot care for others unless they first care for themselves. This course provides students with techniques and interventions for self-care during their academic years and beyond. Self-care requires attention to the mind, body, and spirit, with the goal of healing and wellness. This holistic approach to self-care provides the structure and content for the course, as students engage in practice and reflection to nurture themselves. Emphasis is placed on fostering students’ self-care practices to achieve healing and wellness in the students’ personal and professional lives.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 205  (with a minimum grade of C).

  
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    NUR 326 Special Topics in Nursing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Nursing [NUR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Nursing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Dean may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    NUR 415 Critical Care Nursing

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the development of knowledge, techniques, and skills needed for the delivery of complex nursing care to adults experiencing health problems requiring critical care interventions. The course builds on knowledge from previous nursing courses. Core concepts of current treatment modalities and nursing roles are integrated in discussions of providing holistic care to critically ill patients.

    Prerequisite(s): NUR 405  and NUR 430 .

  
  •  

    NUR 426 Special Topics in Nursing

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Nursing [NUR] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Nursing that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the Dean may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

  
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    NUR 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of nursing that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Any particular prerequisites for an ISP in Nursing are determined by the Division Dean. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Organizational Studies: Business (OSBUS)

  
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    OSBUS 110 Professional Business Etiquette

    3 Credits

    This course introduces professional etiquette for learners so that they can function effectively in business situations. Topics include business introductions, business dress, conduct in and out of the office, as well as business entertainment and manners. While American business etiquette is the primary focus of this course, international variations in business etiquette will also be an integral part of class discussions. Business etiquette is explored as a foundation for business locally, nationally, and globally. Students also incorporate various methodologies for collecting, reporting, documenting, and presenting research findings related to themes.
     

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

  
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    OSBUS 200 Social and Ethical Responsibility

    3 Credits

    Using decision-making strategies, this course guides students through the basic and most important parts of an analysis, leading directly to a decision in the face of ethical conflict. Through timely case studies and detailed analyses, students are exposed to strategies and systems that lead to the implementation of solutions. The course further allows students to develop a working knowledge of ethical principles and reasoning in day-to-day decision-making, and thus apply strategies to personal ethical issues.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 210 Cross-Cultural Communication

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the study of cross-cultural communication and interactions, together with a general understanding of how cultural differences and international settings affect business communication and negotiation. The material is relevant to anyone who anticipates conducting business in a global workplace or works in multi-cultural settings. Students emerge from this course with deepened intellectual and ethical self-awareness as well as an understanding of communication strategies, awareness of the effects of cultural differences, and experience of affective and attitudinal change.
     

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 220 Decision-Making & Problem Solving

    3 Credits

    The current research on reasoning, problem solving, and decision-making, as well as topics informed by this research, is examined in this course. Readings include popular press in addition to a selection of cutting-edge scholarly journal articles. The course is highly interactive and based upon discussions and in-class activities, such as designing and running original experiments to address current research questions. An example of such in-class activities would be the psychology of reasoning and decision-making. The applications of content area to class activities enhance the student’s ability to understand how one interprets information and makes decisions and, then, how to avoid and correct common decision errors.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
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    OSBUS 300 Creativity and Innovation

    3 Credits

    Interdisciplinary in nature, this course focuses on the development of personal creativity and organizational innovation. Like creativity, itself, this course is more about experiences and experiments than tools and methods. The social context for innovation and creativity are also examined. In addition, the course emphasizes social relationships and networks surrounding creative work; the diffusion of innovation; new technologies; changing institutions; and public policy. Students are engaged in an experience of collective innovation and apply that innovation to the work setting.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
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    OSBUS 310 Systems Thinking

    3 Credits

    This course introduces systems thinking as a means to analyze business policy and strategy for the promotion of organizational effectiveness. An examination of the psychological, social, and organizational processes and problems that are associated with thinking and decision-making in managerial and executive contexts are explored. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon exploring the complexities of organizational and systems thinking, the trade-off between rationality and intuition, and the critical role of various contextual influences. Case studies of successful strategy design and implementation using system dynamics are analyzed.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
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    OSBUS 320 Managing Change

    3 Credits

    The ability to manage change prepares students to initiate and lead change in their organizations, and marshal the resources that are necessary for change to occur over the long-term. In this course, students gain a thorough understanding of the requirements for managing change effectively, including making decisions, communication, and implementation. The course begins with the philosophy and principles for managing change and, then, focuses on the processes for implementing change effectively. Throughout the course, students analyze case studies of organizations that have successfully planned and implemented change.
     

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 330 Technology in Organizations

    3 Credits

    Students explore the use of technology in organizations and review the challenges and benefits that simultaneously occur. The relationship between organizational survival, efficiency, and the use of technology is analyzed. Through this analysis, students gain an understanding of how technology can be used as a resource for strategic planning and operational management.

  
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    OSBUS 340 High Performance Work Teams

    3 Credits

    The nature of organizational work teams, with a specific focus on helping students learn how to manage and lead work teams effectively, is examined in this course. Topics of study include internal team functioning (such as knowledge sharing, communication strategies, leadership emergence), external team functioning (such as interacting with stakeholders, managing external trends), and recent team designs (such as multicultural teams, virtual teams, cross-functional teams). Skills gained in this class can be transferred towards becoming a more effective, positive and influential team member or leader across a variety of professional, personal, and academic environments.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 350 Entrepreneurism

    3 Credits

    Students are provided with a basic understanding of the entrepreneurial or new venture process in this course. The critical role that opportunity recognition and creation play in that process is also discussed. Strategy lessons are used to provide a solid framework for understanding the economics of entrepreneurism. In addition, students examine how entrepreneurs and investors create, find, and differentiate money-making and robust opportunities from “good ideas”.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 400 Operations Management

    3 Credits

    A broad understanding and knowledge of operational and managerial concepts are presented in this course. Such concepts include but are not limited to operations strategy, process design, project management, sales forecasting, inventory management, scheduling, and quality management. Presented concepts are then applied to actual business situations

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 410 Risk Management

    3 Credits

    The basic concepts of risk management in business, including measuring and managing financial risks, are the primary focus of this course. Different categories of risk are discussed, and key factors for successful risk management are presented, including shareholder perspective, establishing risk tolerance, organizational models, implementation of the risk management process, as well as risk management solutions, roles and responsibilities. Emphasis is placed upon a broader and deeper understanding of organizational risk and techniques as well as applications that are essential for mitigation of these risks.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSBUS 430 Sustainability in Business

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of current sustainable business theory and practice within the context that sustainable business strategies restore and protect environmental integrity and enhance social equity while improving economic vitality. Students are taught a broad variety of topics including: how we think about sustainability; emerging conceptual frameworks; the business case for sustainability, implementation of a sustainability plan, and reporting systems, including both company reporting and emerging global standards. Emphasis is placed upon an integrated overview and understanding of sustainability to the economic challenges facing any business or community and the evaluation of circumstances to support the design of strategic plans for change that will promote profitability, social well-being, and environmental conservation.
     

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Communication Arts (OSCA)

  
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    OSCA 110 Research and Writing for Professionals

    3 Credits

    This course enables students to practice and develop their writing, critical thinking, research and information literacy skills for a variety of academic and professional disciplines. Students are presented with strategies and skills for formal writing that are the foundation for communication and collaboration in professional environments. Using eFolio, students develop a portfolio of their writing throughout the semester to use as an employment tool that showcases their enriched research and writing skills.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSCA 210 Effective Communications

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to theories and research studies relating to communication skills in small group and team settings. In addition, students examine behaviors associated with verbal and written communication as individual contributors, in informal groups, and on teams. Students also have an opportunity to plan behavior changes to improve communication skills.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSCA 230 Presentational Speaking

    3 Credits

    This course presents an in-depth examination of the theory and practice of preparing and delivering presentations in today’s diverse, global and professional environment. The course integrates effective use of technology during presentations. Students develop interview and research techniques related to topics and presentations; develop audience analyses for presentations; develop communication plans; communicate in public situations with appropriate visual aids; and analyze the presentations of others.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.
  
  •  

    OSCA 310 Organizational Communication

    3 Credits

    In this course, students are exposed to organizational communication theory in practice. The applied nature of organizational communication using foundational and current research in the field is emphasized. Additionally, learners develop an understanding of relevant research designs and methodologies for studying communication in organizations. Case studies are used to learn how to effectively apply communication theory to actual organizational situations. While the course draws upon knowledge and research gathered from a variety of academic disciplines, the focus is on how meaning is created and transmitted through the use of verbal and nonverbal messages.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Coaching (OSCOA)

  
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    OSCOA 310 Coaching

    3 Credits

    A values-based approach to coaching to assist people and organizations in achieving their maximum potential is examined. The course also emphasizes skills building for students in their personal and professional settings to assist others and positively impact individuals, groups, and organizations. Skills and performance-based methodologies are used for students to demonstrate skills in coaching, including the ability to define and distinguish Coaching as a profession from other helping professions; these include effective listening skills, role-play, communication strategies and case study. Students also explore personal thoughts, beliefs, and values and how they affect coaching. In addition, students examine their actions according to guiding ethical principles, including individual, organizational, community and global responsibility.

     

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: History (OSHST)

  
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    OSHST 310 American Business History

    3 Credits

    A historical perspective on American business is presented, with an examination of the impact of historical figures on American business and historical changes.  Topics for review and discussion include early American manufacturing, constitutional and legal infrastructure for business growth, mergers, acquisitions and the economics of change. Discussions also look at our global economy.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Interdisciplinary Studies (OSINT)

  
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    OSINT 400 Professional Case Study

    3 Credits

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in a work- or special interest- related area, in addition to their scheduled courses, may opt to develop a professional case study. Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Any particular prerequisites are determined by the Division Dean. Regular meetings with faculty, including online activity, and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Mathmatics (OSMAT)

  
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    OSMAT 210 Business Math

    3 Credits

    This course examines the application of mathematics in the business world including: accounting, financial analysis, percentages, discounts, simple interest, annuities, etc. Students are presented with theories in business math to solve real problems and perform financial analyses.


Organizational Studies: Philosophy (OSPHL)

  
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    OSPHL 310 Philosophy of Business

    3 Credits

    A multi-disciplinary approach is used to examine business in history, philosophy, management theory, and literature. Areas explored include the understanding of business practice, consensus, conflicts and syntheses of ideas in philosophy, economics and management, various elements of the business enterprise, and personal congruence with the understanding of business. Current business cases and issues are also included in class discussions for practical application.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Psychology (OSPSY)

  
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    OSPSY 310 Psychology of Organizations

    3 Credits

    This course reviews the concepts, theories and research in organizational psychology in order to develop a comprehensive framework for understanding and affecting the performance of people in work settings. Learning occurs at both the conceptual, theoretical and the applied level. Areas covered by the course include: performance measurements, organizational culture and structure, power and influence, management and leadership, groups and teams, motivation, conflict management, organizational change, and individual psychological factors which affect behavior on the job. The course also draws upon the organizational experience of students and encourages the practical application of the material covered. High levels of student participation are required through the use of such experiential learning activities as case studies, simulations, discussions, and the use of the class, itself, as a temporary organization.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Organizational Studies: Theology (OSTHE)

  
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    OSTHE 200 Interreligious Dialogue and Organizational Dynamics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce learners to the principles of interreligious dialogue, while offering a survey of the world’s major religious traditions.  In the second half of the course, students learn the various ways in which an increased understanding of the faith traditions of others might enhance professional growth, conflict resolution, and leadership in organizations.  In addition to studying the scriptures, moral-ethical teachings, and faith practices of Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism, learners explore various interreligious initiatives around the world that are designed to resolve conflict and build mutual understanding and trust within communities and organizations, including the Catholic Common Ground Initiative (www.catholiccommonground.org) and the Franciscan Pace e Bene Nonviolence Service, which has produced teaching materials on the historic meeting between Saint Francis of Assisi and the Sultan of Egypt in 1219 AD.

    Prerequisite(s): LSENG 190  (with a minimum grade of “C”)

    Open to ACE students only.

Philosophy (PHIL)

  
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    PHIL 102 Exploring Ethics

    3 Credits

    In this course, students explore fundamental ethical questions and gain a framework which they can use to think through ethical issues that confront them as human beings, responsible citizens, and emerging leaders in a global community. The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of ethical approaches, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s):  THEO 104  and a minimum of 24 earned credits.   

    1st level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 202 Business Ethics

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the basic philosophical and conceptual structure of the field of business ethics, students examine ethical choices and dilemmas that arise in business contexts and increase their knowledge of how ethics applies to business. They also gain an awareness of the ethical responsibilities facing employees, customers, citizens, managers, and executives, and enhance their knowledge of a basic ethical framework with which to examine a range of ethical issues that arise in business contexts. The course aims to develop the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of ethical approaches to business, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 203 Life’s Big Questions

    3 Credits

    In this survey course, students explore central philosophical questions concerning human nature, the self, freedom, knowledge, reality, God, and the meaning of life. Branches of philosophy such as logic, metaphysics, epistemology, and political philosophy, as well as other areas of thought, are studied. The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of philosophical questions, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s):  

    PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 205 Ethics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credits

    Students examine the relationship between ethics and contemporary issues in criminal justice.
    Current ethical trends and systems are studied, including the legal and correctional professions as well as issues in law enforcement. Students gain an awareness of the ethical responsibilities facing members of the criminal justice professions, and knowledge of a basic ethical framework with which to examine a range of ethical issues that arise in criminal justice contexts. The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of ethical approaches to criminal justice, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 208 Philosophical Themes in Film

    3 Credits

    This course uses film to explore some fundamental philosophic themes and questions. Film is a particularly powerful vehicle for philosophic thought because it is able to represent philosophic ideas in striking imagery and engaging narratives. In this course, students ask questions and explore themes related to metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, social and political philosophy, and epistemology. In addition to introducing students to fundamental questions related to these areas of philosophy, this course aims to enhance the student’s ability to think critically and reflectively. Students will also reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition. 

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 210 Biomedical Ethics

    3 Credits

    In this introduction to the basic philosophical and conceptual structure of the field of biomedical ethics, you will examine ethical choices and dilemmas that arise in healthcare contexts and increase your knowledge of how ethics applies to medicine and healthcare. You will also gain an awareness of the professional and ethical responsibilities of health professionals. The course serves to enhance your knowledge of a basic ethical framework with which to examine a range of ethical issues that arise in healthcare contexts. The course aims to develop your abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of ethical approaches to bioethics, you will explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 215 Life After Death

    3 Credits

    In this course, we will explore the concept of the afterlife from the perspective of the following question: What is the afterlife meant to do and/or what desire does it serve? In response, we will examine the Catholic and Franciscan tradition and ask about the role of the afterlife in this tradition. We will also explore the notion that the afterlife exists to produce behavior, to help individuals escape, in various forms, from the misery of this life, to continue to survive as an individual, and as a way in which the demands of love can be fulfilled.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104   and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 218 Philosophy of Sport

    3 Credits

    In this survey course you will explore central philosophical questions concerning human nature, the mind, ethics, society, and art, as they arise in sport.  You will study branches of philosophy such as social and political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, the philosophy of mind, and aesthetics, as well as other areas of thought.  The course aims to enhance your abilities to think critically and reflectively.  Through study of a variety of philosophical questions, you will explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104   and a minimum of 55 earned credits. 

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 226 Special Topics in Philosophy

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Philosophy [PHIL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Philosophy are numbered at the 226 or 326 level, depending on level of difficulty. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s):  PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd Level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 230 Fate, Freedom and Responsibilty

    3 Credits

    Whether we have free will and some control over our fate, and whether we are morally responsible for what we do, are questions of central importance to what it is to be a human being.  People have long been drawn to think carefully about these questions and modern science has shed important light on them.  In this course students are introduced to the depth and complexity of these questions and offered the means to acquire a solid basis for informed and sophisticated views about the answers to them.  Along the way, through study of a variety of philosophical questions related to free will and moral responsibility, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd Level Philosophy Core Course.
  
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    PHIL 250 Women and Philosophy

    3 Credits

    Women and gender are studied from a variety of perspectives. Emphasis is given to women philosophers, the ideological roots of feminism in the Western world, as well as the changing role and position of women from the Classical period through the 20th century.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 255 Ethics and the Environment

    3 Credits

    The course is an introduction to the basic philosophical and conceptual structure of the field of environmental ethics. Students study ethical choices and dilemmas as they appear in thinking about the natural environment. Students gain an awareness of the ethical responsibilities facing human beings with respect to the natural environment, and knowledge of a basic ethical framework with which to examine a range of ethical issues that arise in thinking about how we ought to live in relation to the natural environment. The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively. Through study of a variety of ethical approaches, students explore the meaning of self, society, and nature, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104   and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 260 The Philosophy of Music

    3 Credits

    A philosophical analysis of the nature and value of music is presented in this course. Additionally, specific topics in the aesthetics of music, such as mimesis, autonomy, meaning, and perception, are also explored. Through a survey of the philosophy of music in ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary periods, students are taught the relationship between philosophy, art, and music.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    This course can be used to satisfy the Fine Arts Core requirement

  
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    PHIL 300 Contemporary Ethical Issues

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the application of ethical theories to specific contemporary issues, e.g., the death penalty; scarcity of resources and economic justice; war and nuclear deterrence; censorship; and ethical problems posed by technology - including such bioethical issues as abortion, euthanasia, and experimentation.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

  
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    PHIL 320 God, Science, Religion and Evil

    3 Credits

    In this course, students engage in philosophical analysis of such topics as the idea of God, the problem of evil, the nature of religion, the relation between science and religion, the relation between religion and morality, the question of the rational justification of religious belief, the nature of religious faith, and the possibility of life after death. Through study of a variety of philosophical questions related to religion and religious belief, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 326 Special Topics in Philosophy

    3 Credits

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Philosophy [PHIL] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Philosophy are numbered at the 226 or 326 level, depending on level of difficulty. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites in addition to those listed below, are published during the preceding semester.

    Prerequisite(s):  PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd Level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 350 Social and Political Philosophy

    3 Credits

    Students examine key social/political concepts such as political obligation, liberty, equality, rights, justice, society and community. The course covers a range of social/political theories and traditions as well as a selection of contemporary social/political issues. The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively about social/political issues. Through study of a variety of social/political philosophies, students explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 360 Existentialism and the Meaning of Life

    3 Credits

    This historical and thematic study of the 19th- to 20th-century philosophical movement known as Existentialism includes such themes as freedom, anxiety, death, the absurd, and the value of the individual against the crowd or mass society. These themes are discussed in the context of the thought of influential existentialist philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.  The course aims to enhance the student’s abilities to think critically and reflectively.  Through study of a variety of existentialist approaches, students will explore the meaning of self and society, and reflect on the compatibility of faith and reason with specific reference to the Catholic Franciscan intellectual and spiritual tradition. 

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102  and THEO 104  and a minimum of 55 earned credits.

    2nd level Philosophy Core Course

  
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    PHIL 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of philosophy that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings and research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 102 , THEO 104 ,Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy and a minimum of 55 earned credits.


Physical Education (PE)

  
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    PE 108 Basic Fitness

    1 Credit

    The online course is designed to improve students’ fitness levels by providing a fitness program that explores progressive overload mechanism. The program shall increase in intensity as the semester progresses. The program targets the muscular and cardiovascular systems. Each week a new fitness workout, consisting of a strength training and cardiovascular workout, will be posted in Blackboard. The workout will provide exercise guidelines regarding exercise frequency, intensity, time duration and mode of training. Students are required to maintain and submit a log of completed exercises.

  
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    PE 126 Special Topics in Physical Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Education [PE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
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    PE 200 Aerobic Dance

    1 Credit

    The course will inform students on how to apply movements to music to achieve physiological improvements on the cardiovascular /muscular systems. Class will focus on dance routines, such as Zumba, Cardio, CardiYo® (high intensity), and /or Latin.

  
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    PE 205 Tennis

    1 Credit

    Students are introduced to the basics of grip, stroke, footwork, and rules/scoring of tennis.

  
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    PE 206 Golf

    1 Credit

    Students are introduced to the basics of grip, stance, swing, and rules/scoring of golf.

  
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    PE 207 Bowling

    1 Credit

    Students are introduced to the basics of ball selection, footwork, swing, and rules/scoring of the game.

  
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    PE 208 Intermediate Fitness

    1 Credit

    The online course is designed to improve students’ fitness levels by providing a fitness program that explores progressive overload mechanism. The program shall increase in intensity as the semester progresses. The program targets the muscular and cardiovascular systems. Each week a new fitness workout, consisting of a strength training and cardiovascular workout, will be posted in Blackboard. The workout will provide exercise guidelines regarding exercise frequency, intensity, time duration and mode of training. Students are required to maintain and submit a log of completed exercises.

  
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    PE 209 Racquetball

    2 Credits

    Students are introduced to all aspects of the game with an emphasis on skill development.

  
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    PE 210 Handball

    2 Credits

    Students are introduced to all aspects of the game with an emphasis on skill development.

  
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    PE 211 Pilates

    1 Credit

    The course is designed to introduce the origins and fundamentals of Pilates. Students learn how the practical application of the class lesson can help develop core strength and flexibility. The class targets a balance of strengthening and stretching the muscular system. Using body weight and floor base movements, students will develop all the musculature of the core, including spinal flexors, extensors, lateral flexors, obliques and transverse abdominals

  
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    PE 213 Karate

    1 Credit

    In this course, students are introduced to both the world of martial arts and to the specific physical aspects of karate, which includes learning the basic techniques of self-defense. Through their study and training regimen, students gain an appreciation for what karate is and is not. They also learn to further develop their coordination, flexibility, timing, muscle tone, speed, strength, cardiovascular system, and self-confidence.

  
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    PE 214 Physical Conditioning and Well-being

    1 Credit

    In this study of and participation in various exercise programs, special emphasis is given to the proper way to exercise, the development of good eating habits for diet, and stress management. Each student is shown how to develop his/her own personal fitness program and schedule.

  
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    PE 215 Team Sports

    1 Credit

    Instruction and participation in team sports such as soccer, touch football, volleyball, basketball, and softball acquaint students with the basic skills and rules of these team sports

  
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    PE 216 Yoga

    1 Credit

    The course is designed to introduce the origins and fundamentals of Yoga. The class will focus on connecting mind with body through breathing and relaxation techniques. Movements selected will help to increase functional mobility and relaxation of the mind. Students learn how the practical application of the class lesson can help develop core strength and flexibility. Class targets a balance of strengthening and stretching the muscular system. Using body weight and floor-based movements, students will develop all the musculature of the core, including spinal flexors, extensors, lateral flexors, obliques and transverse abdominals.

  
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    PE 220 Karate and Character Development

    3 Credits

    The course examines the concept of wellness attainment, leading to a method and philosophy of directing one’s mind and body to experience holistic growth through physical, spiritual, and positive awareness. With study and practice, students are taught the physical and mental processes which support their learning growth and self-realization. They also gain a basic understanding of what karate is and is not. Through training exercises, students develop coordination, flexibility, muscle tone, strength, and confidence. This training also decreases stress, improves the cardiovascular system, and can stimulate weight loss. Karate-do goals are to foster the traits of courage, courtesy, integrity, humility, and self-control. Students explore this art, a mastery of its techniques, and a polishing of its virtues that cause one’s inner light to guide daily actions.

  
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    PE 226 Special Topics in Physical Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Education [PE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
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    PE 308 Advanced Fitness

    1 Credit

    Course is designed to always challenge students with various fitness formats and workouts. Throughout the semester, the basic fitness principles of frequency, intensity and time duration will be manipulated so that students never hit a fitness plateau. Therefore, students can expect an improvement in their fitness level. The program targets the muscular and cardiovascular systems.

  
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    PE 326 Special Topics in Physical Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Education [PE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
  •  

    PE 426 Special Topics in Physical Education

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Education [PE] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Education that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester.

  
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    PE 480 Independent Study Project (ISP)

    Credit Varies

    Qualified students who seek individualized advanced study in some area of physical education that is not covered in scheduled courses may apply for an Independent Study Project (ISP). Students assume responsibility for special readings, research, and/or training requirements under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Regular meetings with faculty and completion of all assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Conditions of the University’s ISP Policy.


Physical Science (PHYSC)

  
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    PHYSC 105 Physical Science

    3 Credits

    Students are introduced to scientific concepts which are the foundations for a variety of disciplines in the physical sciences — including physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and astronomy. This broad view of the physical sciences incorporates both the methods of investigation and problem-solving techniques through which these concepts were developed and the application of such methods and models to current topics. Relationships among these disciplines and connections with current events are discussed.

    Concurrent with PHYSC 115 .

    Science Core Course

  
  •  

    PHYSC 115 Physical Science Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This hands-on introduction to experimental methods of scientific investigation includes selected experiments relating to topics covered in PHYSC 105 .

    Concurrent with PHYSC 105 

    Science Core Course

  
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    PHYSC 125 Earth and Space Science

    3 Credits

    As a study of the concepts which constitute the foundations of astronomy, space science, and the earth sciences (geology, meteorology, and oceanography), this course involves calculations for the solution of problems in astronomy and geology. Relationships of space and earth sciences to physics and chemistry are explored and applied. Current and changing models for the description of the earth and the universe are also investigated, with a particular focus among the various scientific disciplines and their connections to current popular perceptions of the earth.

    Concurrent with PHYSC 135 .

    Science Core Course

    Previous courses in physics and chemistry are recommended but not required. The ability to apply algebra is required.
  
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    PHYSC 126 Special Topics in Physical Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Science [PHYSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

    Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.
  
  •  

    PHYSC 135 Earth and Space Science Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This hands-on introduction to experimental methods of scientific inquiry includes selected experiments relating to topics covered in PHYSC 125 .

    Concurrent with PHYSC 125 .

    Science Core Course

  
  •  

    PHYSC 226 Special Topics in Physical Science

    Credit Varies

    Neumann University periodically offers Special Topics courses in Physical Science [PHYSC] that reflect specific topics of study which are not part of the standard University curriculum. Special Topics courses in Physical Science that are numbered at the 126/226 level are generally open to all students and may be designated as Core courses. Courses at the 326 level are specifically designed for students at either the junior or senior level, while courses at the 426 level are only open to students with senior standing. For any given semester, course title(s) and content area(s), as well as any specified prerequisites, are published during the preceding semester. Permission of the instructor may also be required before a student can register for any Special Topics course.

 

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